Monthly Archives: October 2010

At Home (Tacticalendar, Denkimono Clock)

via OSHUG

Open source hardware is not just about catering for niche applications and marginal use cases and many projects are concerned with creating devices for everyday use. For the sixth OSHUG meeting we'll have presentations on two projects targeted at the home and one that doesn't even involve electricity!

Tacticalendar

Tacticalendar is an open design project for a timeless 4-week-ahead rolling planner. New versions are managed through a github issue-tracker, laser cut from plywood and acrylic, articulated with duct tape, offered at a discount to release candidate testers and finally shared with premium customers. A continually evolving product, it is the first to market from the Enigmaker.org open prototyping experiment - a two-month project to prototype an invention every week in the public domain. Patent protection has been rejected in favour of a share-alike design and an open innovation community. Near-term feature testing includes Google Calendar synchronization using machine-vision and augmented-reality techniques.

Cefn Hoile sculpts open source hardware and software, and supports others doing the same. Drawing on ten years of experience in R&D for a multinational technology company, he works as a public domain inventor through Enigmaker.org, and an innovation catalyst and architect of bespoke digital installations and prototypes, working most recently with Tinker.it, BT, the BBC, EDF, Nokia. Cefn is a founder-member of the CuriosityCollective.org digital arts group, and a regular contributor to open source projects and not-for-profits.

slides [jpegs]

Denkimono Clock

TheDenkimono Clock is a kit to build a countdown timer, fully functional alarm clock and stopwatch, that is not only fun to build but that also provides a practical device for everyday use. This talk will cover the initial design and build as a personal hobby project, to its redesign as a commercial kit and the associated sales, marketing and after-sales service. Initial concerns over open sourcing and how these turned out to be unfounded will also be covered.

Mark Longstaff-Tyrrell trained as an electronics engineer and was seduced by the money and glamour of software and began his career writing code for fruit machines in a shed in Wolverhampton. He subsequently progressed to developing for mobile handsets with extendible aerials in the late 90s, and then for stylus driven PDAs and currently develops software for Android devices.

slides [PDF]

Lightning Talks

Take the stage for five minutes and tell us all about your open hardware home hacks!

At Home (Tacticalendar, Denkimono Clock)

via OSHUG

Open source hardware is not just about catering for niche applications and marginal use cases and many projects are concerned with creating devices for everyday use. For the sixth OSHUG meeting we'll have presentations on two projects targeted at the home and one that doesn't even involve electricity!

Tacticalendar

Tacticalendar is an open design project for a timeless 4-week-ahead rolling planner. New versions are managed through a github issue-tracker, laser cut from plywood and acrylic, articulated with duct tape, offered at a discount to release candidate testers and finally shared with premium customers. A continually evolving product, it is the first to market from the Enigmaker.org open prototyping experiment - a two-month project to prototype an invention every week in the public domain. Patent protection has been rejected in favour of a share-alike design and an open innovation community. Near-term feature testing includes Google Calendar synchronization using machine-vision and augmented-reality techniques.

Cefn Hoile sculpts open source hardware and software, and supports others doing the same. Drawing on ten years of experience in R&D for a multinational technology company, he works as a public domain inventor through Enigmaker.org, and an innovation catalyst and architect of bespoke digital installations and prototypes, working most recently with Tinker.it, BT, the BBC, EDF, Nokia. Cefn is a founder-member of the CuriosityCollective.org digital arts group, and a regular contributor to open source projects and not-for-profits.

slides [jpegs]

Denkimono Clock

TheDenkimono Clock is a kit to build a countdown timer, fully functional alarm clock and stopwatch, that is not only fun to build but that also provides a practical device for everyday use. This talk will cover the initial design and build as a personal hobby project, to its redesign as a commercial kit and the associated sales, marketing and after-sales service. Initial concerns over open sourcing and how these turned out to be unfounded will also be covered.

Mark Longstaff-Tyrrell trained as an electronics engineer and was seduced by the money and glamour of software and began his career writing code for fruit machines in a shed in Wolverhampton. He subsequently progressed to developing for mobile handsets with extendible aerials in the late 90s, and then for stylus driven PDAs and currently develops software for Android devices.

slides [PDF]

Lightning Talks

Take the stage for five minutes and tell us all about your open hardware home hacks!

Radio (HPSDR)

via OSHUG

Radio spectrum is a finite resource and it should therefore come as no surprise that radio systems are a particularly hot area of research. Whilst ever more advanced schemes for modulation, digital encoding and spectrum access promise increased efficiency, step upgrades more often than not require new hardware. As has been evidenced in the evolution of mobile telephony from analogue to GSM and 2.5G (GPRS) to 3G, and similarly in the evolution of wireless computer networks. A disruptive development in radio technology promises to change this and to bring an unprecedented flexibility to radio systems, and one similar to that which programming brought to the task of machine computation. Despite, or perhaps due to being at the cutting edge there are a number of open source hardware projects concerned with developing software-defined radio (SDR) technology. As with the earliest developments in radio systems radio amateurs are once again at the forefront, and at this month's meeting we will have a presentation on the comprehensive HPSDR platform.

HPSDR - High Performance Software Defined Radio

HPSDR is an open source (GNU type) hardware and software project intended as the "next generation" software-defined radio for radio amateurs and shortwave listeners. It is being developed by a group of software-defined radio enthusiasts around the world, and in a modular hardware fashion to help promote experimentation by both hardware and software developers.

John Melton has held an amateur radio license since 1984 when he was first licensed as N6LYT while living and working in California, and he was assigned the UK callsign of G0ORX on moving back to the UK. He became interested in developing open source software in 1990 with the launch of AMSAT Oscar 16, an amateur radio satellite with a store and forward messaging payload. He developed an open source software package to communicate with the satellite that ran on Linux (pre 1.0) and subsequently wrote an open source fully automated satellite ground station software package in Java. John has been a software engineer since 1970 when he was employed by Burroughs Corporation, and for the last 14 years he has worked for Sun Microsystems who were acquired by Oracle this year.

slides [PDF]

Open Discussion - Ideas for Future Meetings

Themes, speakers, venues - it's all up for grabs! Have your say and help shape future OSHUG meetings. Offer to present, suggest a speaker or sit quietly until it's time to cross the road to the pub...

Radio (HPSDR)

via OSHUG

Radio spectrum is a finite resource and it should therefore come as no surprise that radio systems are a particularly hot area of research. Whilst ever more advanced schemes for modulation, digital encoding and spectrum access promise increased efficiency, step upgrades more often than not require new hardware. As has been evidenced in the evolution of mobile telephony from analogue to GSM and 2.5G (GPRS) to 3G, and similarly in the evolution of wireless computer networks. A disruptive development in radio technology promises to change this and to bring an unprecedented flexibility to radio systems, and one similar to that which programming brought to the task of machine computation. Despite, or perhaps due to being at the cutting edge there are a number of open source hardware projects concerned with developing software-defined radio (SDR) technology. As with the earliest developments in radio systems radio amateurs are once again at the forefront, and at this month's meeting we will have a presentation on the comprehensive HPSDR platform.

HPSDR - High Performance Software Defined Radio

HPSDR is an open source (GNU type) hardware and software project intended as the "next generation" software-defined radio for radio amateurs and shortwave listeners. It is being developed by a group of software-defined radio enthusiasts around the world, and in a modular hardware fashion to help promote experimentation by both hardware and software developers.

John Melton has held an amateur radio license since 1984 when he was first licensed as N6LYT while living and working in California, and he was assigned the UK callsign of G0ORX on moving back to the UK. He became interested in developing open source software in 1990 with the launch of AMSAT Oscar 16, an amateur radio satellite with a store and forward messaging payload. He developed an open source software package to communicate with the satellite that ran on Linux (pre 1.0) and subsequently wrote an open source fully automated satellite ground station software package in Java. John has been a software engineer since 1970 when he was employed by Burroughs Corporation, and for the last 14 years he has worked for Sun Microsystems who were acquired by Oracle this year.

slides [PDF]

Open Discussion - Ideas for Future Meetings

Themes, speakers, venues - it's all up for grabs! Have your say and help shape future OSHUG meetings. Offer to present, suggest a speaker or sit quietly until it's time to cross the road to the pub...