Monthly Archives: December 2014

MakeSmith CNC

via WyoLum Blog

The rest of the WyoLum crew get to have fun with laser cutters and 3D printers to build cool and interesting Open Source goodies for everyone. I figured I needed to get in on some construction action too, so I recently purchased a MakeSmith DIY CNC machine (www.makesmithtech.com) from their recently completed Kickstarter Campaign (I love Kickstarter…;-). It’s a very low cost entry into a small scale CNC set up (work area approx 9 inch square) for hobbies etc. and I couldn’t resist the idea of trying it out. Over the next few months I thought it would be interesting to post some updates to the blog detailing how I get on with putting it together and what I end up using it for..

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Chronogram2 – A Modern Timepiece

via WyoLum Blog

If you’re at all familiar with the C3Jr (which you should be given you’re reading the WyoLum blog..;-), then you may know about it’s larger sibling the Chronogram2. Originally offered as part of the Kickstarter campaign, it’s two C3Jr’s combined to tell time minute by minute in glorious fashion. Here’s how to put one together (see attached PDF)!

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Chronogram2 Construction

Just in Time Parts vs. the Junkbox

via Nuts and Volts

Cleaning out my workshop reminded me of when I first started my journey in electronics — tubes were still available at RadioShack. My first ham radio transmitter — a HeathKit DX-60B — used a 6146B tube final amplifier (power amplifier), in part because it was inexpensive and readily available. Back then, I had a junkbox with a few dozen tubes, a pound or two of discrete resistors and capacitors, and some miscellaneous hardware. With that, I could repair just about any TV, receiver, or transmitter that I came across or wanted to modify.

Just in Time Parts vs. the Junkbox

via Nuts and Volts

Cleaning out my workshop reminded me of when I first started my journey in electronics — tubes were still available at RadioShack. My first ham radio transmitter — a HeathKit DX-60B — used a 6146B tube final amplifier (power amplifier), in part because it was inexpensive and readily available. Back then, I had a junkbox with a few dozen tubes, a pound or two of discrete resistors and capacitors, and some miscellaneous hardware. With that, I could repair just about any TV, receiver, or transmitter that I came across or wanted to modify.