How to create a signed Windows 8 driver for USB Ir Toy

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HakanL writes:

As part of a home automation project I’ve been testing different infrared receivers/transmitters. One inexpensive USB-based transceiver is the USB Infrared Toy (v2)
This uses the Microchip PIC 18F2550 microcontroller which acts as a virtual USB serial port. The problem is that the included driver isn’t signed so it can’t be used in Windows 8.x. Various people have suggested to disable signature checking in Windows, but that’s both risky and complicated. I wanted to go the proper route instead, which is to sign the driver with a certificate. A real certificate is about $180/year (code signing certificate) and I didn’t wan to pay that, so the alternative is to use a self-created certificate and ask Windows to trust that (which is a normal Windows process, doesn’t require a diagnostic boot, etc). I wanted to document the steps so it can be reproduced as well for other drivers.

Details at Hakan’s coding and stuff site.

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