Monthly Archives: June 2016

DIY smart glasses

via Dangerous Prototypes

DIY-Smart-Glasses

Harris has been working on his DIY smart glasses:

The glasses themselves are based around an STM32F051K8 microcontroller (LQFP32 for easy soldering!). All the firmware is custom written though I got the LCD driver initialization codes from the BuyDisplay examples. The firmware is written using a somewhat “co-operative scheduling” with interrupts methodology and for most of the time, the microcontroller is sleeping until something needs to happen. Along side all the Bluetooth and LCD software, I’ve included my SoftTouch library for the two touch buttons on the side of my glasses. These are used to change screens and change items within the screen e.g. move to the next news entry.

Project info at Harris’ Electronics site.

Via Hacked Gadgets.

Hacking a rotary phone with an Arduino and a GSM shield

via Arduino Blog

While cleaning out his closet, Instructables user “Acmecorporation” discovered an old rotary telephone. Instead of tossing it away, the Maker decided to give the old-school device some modern-day technology using an Arduino Pro Mini and a SIM900 GSM shield.

Acmecorporation is able to use the aptly named TOWA Phone (There Once Was A Telephone) to make and receive calls, send single DMTF tones, and even program numbers on speed dial. Aside from its classic bell ringer, there’s an RGB LED that indicates GSM status: red for offline, green for online, and blue for an incoming call.

The Maker briefly explains how it works:

To make a phone call you have to pick up the handset and dial the number, that’s all. Terminate call hanging up the handset.

When phone is ringing, pick up the handset to answer. Terminate it hanging up.

If you call to a support center or an office, usually you have to dial numbers to connect a specific department. You can do this because TOWA sends single DMTF tones.

Inside the Arduino script, you can add your favorite telephone numbers and combine it with a specific integer number. For example, I’ve stored my favorites combined with numbers from 1 to 8. So when I pick up the handset and dial 1, it starts a call to my wife. When I dial 2 or 3, it calls one of my sons, and so on.

Although Acmecorporation didn’t design TOWA for everyday use, it has become a permanent fixture on his desk. Do you have a rotary phone lying around? Time to brush off the dust and rig your own!

Grab things with an Arduino robotic gripper

via Arduino Blog

Recently-graduated high school students Sam Baumgarten and Graham Hughes have developed a pretty rad robotic gripper with the help of Arduino and 3D printing. The gripper itself consists of three large hobby servos joined to the fingers with a linkage. The underactuated fingers have a force sensor under each contact point, while the control glove is equipped with tiny vibrating motors at the fingertips. This, of course, provides haptic feedback to ensure that the user doesn’t crush anything–the greater the pressure, the stronger the motors vibrate.

The gripper is mounted to a handle with abrasive tape–the same kind found on staircases and skateboards. The tape is also used on each finger for optimal gripping. A box at the base of the pole houses all of the electronics, which include an Arduino Pro Mini for controlling the addressable LEDs on top, another Arduino for handling the communication and fingers, and a battery for power.

Aside from the vibration motors, the glove features flexible resistors on the back of the fingers, an LED strip for visualization, a breakout board for measuring the resistance from the flex sensors, a battery, an Arduino Uno for processing, and an XBee module for transmitting the signals to the Arduino in the gripper.

If you think this sounds awesome, wait until you see it in action. Both Baumgartnen and Hughes (who actually created the original prototype shown below) have shared demos of the project, along with a detailed breakdown of the build. Kudos to Hackaday for finding this incredible piece of work!

Blast off with The MagPi 47 Astro Pi special!

via Raspberry Pi

Get your free poster and mission patch exclusively in the print edition of The MagPi 47!

Get your free poster and mission patch exclusively in the print edition of The MagPi 47!

We’ve been avidly following Tim Peake’s adventures in space in The MagPi for the last six months, especially all the excellent work he’s been doing with the Astro Pis running code from school students across the UK. Tim returned to Earth a couple of weeks ago, so we thought we’d celebrate in The MagPi 47 with a massive feature about his time in space, along with the results of the Astro Pi experiments and the project’s future…

The space celebration doesn’t stop there: print copies of The MagPi 47 come with an exclusive Astro Pi mission patch and a Tim Peake Astro Pi poster!

The results of what Tim, Ed, and Izzy have been up to for the past six months

The results of what Tim, Ed, and Izzy have been up to for the past six months

The issue also has our usual range of excellent tutorials, from programming dinosaurs to creating motion sensor games and optical illusions. We also have the hottest news on high-altitude balloons and how you can get involved in sending a Pi to the edge of space, as well as the details on the next Pi Wars Pi-powered robot competition.

You can get your latest spaceworthy issue in-store from WH Smith, Tesco, Sainsburys, and Asda. Our American cousins will be able to buy issues from Barnes & Noble and Micro Center when the issue makes its way over there. It’s also available right now in print on our online store, which delivers internationally. If you prefer digital, it’s ready to download on the Android and iOS apps.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and start with issue 47 to not only get the poster and mission patch, but also a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero and a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 47.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

This is not the end of Astro Pi. It’s only the beginning.

The post Blast off with The MagPi 47 Astro Pi special! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Blast off with The MagPi 47 Astro Pi special!

via Raspberry Pi

Get your free poster and mission patch exclusively in the print edition of The MagPi 47!

Get your free poster and mission patch exclusively in the print edition of The MagPi 47!

We’ve been avidly following Tim Peake’s adventures in space in The MagPi for the last six months, especially all the excellent work he’s been doing with the Astro Pis running code from school students across the UK. Tim returned to Earth a couple of weeks ago, so we thought we’d celebrate in The MagPi 47 with a massive feature about his time in space, along with the results of the Astro Pi experiments and the project’s future…

The space celebration doesn’t stop there: print copies of The MagPi 47 come with an exclusive Astro Pi mission patch and a Tim Peake Astro Pi poster!

The results of what Tim, Ed, and Izzy have been up to for the past six months

The results of what Tim, Ed, and Izzy have been up to for the past six months

The issue also has our usual range of excellent tutorials, from programming dinosaurs to creating motion sensor games and optical illusions. We also have the hottest news on high-altitude balloons and how you can get involved in sending a Pi to the edge of space, as well as the details on the next Pi Wars Pi-powered robot competition.

You can get your latest spaceworthy issue in-store from WH Smith, Tesco, Sainsburys, and Asda. Our American cousins will be able to buy issues from Barnes & Noble and Micro Center when the issue makes its way over there. It’s also available right now in print on our online store, which delivers internationally. If you prefer digital, it’s ready to download on the Android and iOS apps.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and start with issue 47 to not only get the poster and mission patch, but also a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero and a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 47.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

This is not the end of Astro Pi. It’s only the beginning.

The post Blast off with The MagPi 47 Astro Pi special! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Intel releases an improved version of the Arduino 101 core!

via Arduino Blog

101

A few weeks ago, an announcement was posted on the Arduino Forum mentioning new improvements on the software side of the Arduino/Genuino 101. With this release, the board–which was developed in collaboration with Intel–is reaching its full potential, with not only better code generation but unlocking useful features to make your sketches even more interactive as well.

You can easily upgrade the core using the Arduino IDE’s Board Manager (pictured below), while Arduino Create users will be automatically updated, so no action is required–the cool thing about the cloud!

Core-package

In more detail:

  • The GCC compiler has been updated to support hardware extensions to the ARC EM core in the Intel® Curie™ module. This provides significant improvements in floating point operations, bit shifting, and other operations to enhance Sketch performance.
  • The Arduino/Genuino 101 platform offers 2MB Flash storage onboard, which is now enabled for user sketches.
  • An experimental driver has been implemented to enable the I2S interface via the CurieI2S library. Connecting the I2S bus to an external DAC (digital to analog converter) allows users to play high-quality music (HiFi).

Other improvements and bug fixes:

  • Motion Sensor: Several sample sketches, like MotionDetection, have been implemented to demonstrate the application of the IMU data
  • Bluetooth LE: Several new examples for BLE peripheral library added
  • IMU: Correct motion detection setting implemented
  • Library CurieTimerOne APIs are now compatible with the TimerOne library

For comprehensive release notes refer to the Intel Open Source Technology Center on GitHub.