Monthly Archives: September 2016

Review of NeoDen 4 pick and place machine with vision system

via Dangerous Prototypes

cnc

Ray Wang wrote up a review of NeoDen 4 pick and place machine with built-in vision system:

Recently NeoDen released a new model called NeoDen 4 — it’s their first desktop model that has built-in computer vision system. The vision-based alignment makes it possible to place fine-pitched components with minimal manual work. It has four pick and place heads, which means if can simultaneously pick up to four components at a time. It can fit a lot more feeders, and can handle a variety of component types, including matrix tray components, and any special components that you can lay out in a 3D printed tray. It has a vibration feeder for components in tube packaging. Although I rarely use tube packaging, one notable exception is the CH340G USB-serial chip, which is used in almost all my products, and so far it only comes in tubes.

More details at Rayshobby.net.

Check out the video after the break.

Free PCB coupon via Facebook to 2 random commenters

via Dangerous Prototypes

BP

Every Friday we give away some extra PCBs via Facebook. This post was announced on Facebook, and on Monday we’ll send coupon codes to two random commenters. The coupon code usually go to Facebook ‘Other’ Messages Folder . More PCBs via Twitter on Tuesday and the blog every Sunday. Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times every week:

Some stuff:

  • Yes, we’ll mail it anywhere in the world!
  • We’ll contact you via Facebook with a coupon code for the PCB drawer.
  • Limit one PCB per address per month, please.
  • Like everything else on this site, PCBs are offered without warranty.

We try to stagger free PCB posts so every time zone has a chance to participate, but the best way to see it first is to subscribe to the RSS feed, follow us on Twitter, or like us on Facebook.

Friday Product Post: Apply Directly to the Forehead!

via SparkFun Electronics Blog Posts

Greetings and salutations, ladies and gentlemen. This week we don’t have anything necessarily “new” for you. What we do have are a few of our best-selling parts, now available with headers pre-soldered on. The IOIO-OTG, the TB6612FNG Motor Driver, and the MMA8452Q Triple Axis Accelerometer can all now be purchased pre-assembled with headers already attached! Let’s take a closer look.

Headers On. Apply Directly to the Forehead. Headers On. Apply Directly to the Forehead.

SparkFun Triple Axis Accelerometer Breakout - MMA8452Q (with Headers)

BOB-13926
$ 10.49

This breakout board makes it easy to use the tiny MMA8452Q accelerometer in your project. The MMA8452Q is a smart, low-power, three-axis, capacitive MEMS accelerometer with 12 bits of resolution. This accelerometer is packed with embedded functions with flexible, user-programmable options, configurable to two interrupt pins. Embedded interrupt functions allow for overall power savings, relieving the host processor from continuously polling data. Due to popular demand, this version of the SparkFun Triple Axis Accelerometer Breakout includes pre-soldered male headers for ease of use. With the headers already soldered on, you can jump right in to using this little board without any assembly!

SparkFun Motor Driver - Dual TB6612FNG (with Headers)

ROB-13845
$ 9.49

The TB6612FNG Motor Driver can control up to two DC motors at a constant current of 1.2A (3.2A peak). Two input signals (IN1 and IN2) can be used to control the motor in one of four function modes: CW, CCW, short-brake and stop. The two motor outputs (A and B) can be separately controlled. The speed of each motor is controlled via a PWM input signal with a frequency up to 100kHz. The STBY pin should be pulled high to take the motor out of standby mode. Like the Triple Axis Accelerometer Breakout, this board has headers already attached. No soldering required!

IOIO-OTG - V2 (with Headers)

DD-13964
$ 34.95

Are you a Java developer looking to add advanced hardware I/O capabilities to your Android or PC application? Well, then the IOIO-OTG is for you! The IOIO-OTG (pronounced “yo-yo-O-T-G”) is a development board specially designed to do just that. It features a PIC microcontroller, which acts as a bridge connecting an app on your PC or Android device to low-level peripherals like GPIO, PWM, ADC, I2C, SPI, and UART. An app-level library helps you write control code for these low-level peripherals in the same way you’d write any other Java app! This special version of our older Version 2 of the IOIO-OTG comes with female headers already soldered onto the board!

Unlike in the newer version of the IOIO-OTG, a USB-A to micro-A OTG cable is NOT included. The V2 IOIO-OTG was found in our old IOIO SIK, and once we are out of stock of this product we will not be restocking it.

Transistor Array - ULN2803 (3 Pack)

COM-13885
$ 1.95

Now for something completely different! This simple Transistor Array pack contains three SMD ULN2803 ICs from Texas Instruments. Each of these tiny ICs consists of eight NPN Darlington pairs that feature high-voltage outputs with common-cathode clamp diodes for switching a board’s inductive loads with a collector current of 500mA. Each ULN2803 can absolutely be connected in parallel to achieve higher current capability.

That’s it for this week, folks. We really hope these new products with the headers already attached make life easier for you in developing new projects. If you have any other products that you would like to see have headers pre-soldered on, let us know in the comments below. We’ll see you back here next Friday with even more new products. See you then!

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Doorjam – play your own theme music

via Raspberry Pi

Have you ever dreamed about having your own theme music? That perfect song that reflects your mood as you enter a room, drawing the attention of others towards you?

I know I have. Though that might be due to my desire to live in a Disney movie, or maybe just because I spent three years studying drama and live in a constant state of theatrical bliss.

Whatever the reason, it’s fair to say that Doorjam is an awesome build.

Doorjam

Walk into your theme song. Powered by Spotify. http://doorjam.in

Using a WiFi dongle, repurposed as an iBeacon, the Doorjam mobile phone app allows you to select your theme song from Spotify and play it via a boombox when you are in range.

Stick-figure diagram showing the way Doorjam lets you choose your theme music and plays it when you're within range

The team at redpepper have made the build code available publicly, taking makers through a step-by-step tutorial on their website.

So while we work on our own Doorjam build, why don’t you tell us what your ultimate theme music would be?

And for inspiration, I’ll hand over to Joseph…

(500) Days of Summer – “You Make My Dreams Come True” by Hall & Oates [HD VIDEO CLIP]

I know this feeling very well.

 

The post Doorjam – play your own theme music appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Tutorial: DHT22 sensor with a PICmicro

via Dangerous Prototypes

AM2303_DHT22

Gianni Bernardo has published a tutorial for usage of DHT22 sensor with a PICmicro (machine translation).

Tutorial about DHT22 / AM2302 Digital Humidity and Temperature sensor usage on picmicro, using XC Compiler. Code is for a PIC12F1822, data from sensor are formatted and sent on UART @9600baud

Source code is available on github.

Via the contact form.

Play beautiful music on an Arduino thumb piano

via Arduino Blog

With an accelerometer and capacitive sensing, even a beginner can produce some great tunes with this DIY device.

If you like making beautiful music, but would rather not actually practice this skill, perhaps this thumb piano and controller by producer/DJ Rob Blazey would be a good instrument to pick up. His project, called “Kalimbo,” employs an Arduino to translate manipulations of metal rods, along with movement of the piano itself, into Open Sound Control (OSC) messages. These are then be used to produce music.

You first hear its awesomeness around the 1:00 mark in the video seen below. Even just moving it around sounds good, but it becomes incredible when he really starts playing just before 2:00!

Inside the instrument there is an Arduino with an accelerometer and a capacitive sensing wire, which is connected to the insulated bridge at the back, so touching the edge of that bridge acts as a trigger or switch or can control things more precisely depending on how hard you press it.

Intrigued? You can find more background on this project in mrblazey’s video description.