Monthly Archives: July 2017

Everything You Need To Know About Logic Probes

via hardware – Hackaday

We just spent the last hour watching a video, embedded below, that is the most comprehensive treasure trove of information regarding a subject that we should all know more about — sniffing logic signals. Sure, it’s a long video, but [Joel] of [OpenTechLab] leaves no stone unturned.

At the center of the video is the open-source sigrok logic capture and analyzer. It’s great because it supports a wide variety of dirt cheap hardware platforms, including the Salae logic and its clones. Logic is where it shines, but it’ll even log data from certain scopes, multimeters, power supplies, and more. Not only can sigrok decode raw voltages into bits, but it can interpret the bits as well using protocol decoder plugins written in Python. What this all means is that someday, it will decode everything. For free.

[Joel] knows a thing or two about sigrok because he started the incredibly slick PulseView GUI project for it, but that doesn’t stop him from walking you through the command-line interface, which is really useful for automated data capture and analysis, if that’s your sort of thing. Both are worth knowing.

But it’s actually the hardware details where this video shines. He breaks down all of the logic probes on his bench, points out their design pros and cons, and uses that basis to explain just what kind of performance you can expect for $20 or so. You’ll walk away with an in-depth understanding of the whole toolchain, from grabber probes to GUIs.

Indeed, toward the end, [Joel] simulates the parasitic inductance of using flying-lead connectors and demonstrates how it destroys high-frequency signals. Even if the logic analyzer were able to sample fast enough, no signal makes it that far. But he doesn’t wave his hands around the problem — he shows you. And then he mentions hard-core-hacker-friendly tricks to get up into the hundreds of megahertz, with a hat-tip to [Bunnie Huang].

In our opinion sigrok, and the el cheapo hardware logic probes that it supports deserve a place in every hacker’s toolbox. This video is the best introduction to the software, and the topic in general, that we’ve ever seen.

We’ve featured two other videos from the [OpenTechLab], one on the ICE40 FPGA and one on high-frequency synthesis, that you might also like. So put away whatever brain-rotting Hollywood blockbuster you have on the shelf, and make some popcorn for quality nerd time.


Filed under: hardware

Free PCB coupon via Facebook to 2 random commenters

via Dangerous Prototypes

BP

Every Friday we give away some extra PCBs via Facebook. This post was announced on Facebook, and on Monday we’ll send coupon codes to two random commenters. The coupon code usually go to Facebook ‘Other’ Messages Folder . More PCBs via Twitter on Tuesday and the blog every Sunday. Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times every week:

Some stuff:

  • Yes, we’ll mail it anywhere in the world!
  • We’ll contact you via Facebook with a coupon code for the PCB drawer.
  • Limit one PCB per address per month, please.
  • Like everything else on this site, PCBs are offered without warranty.

We try to stagger free PCB posts so every time zone has a chance to participate, but the best way to see it first is to subscribe to the RSS feed, follow us on Twitter, or like us on Facebook.

A new era for Arduino begins today

via Arduino Blog

BCMI, the company founded by Massimo Banzi, David Cuartielles, David Mellis and Tom Igoe, co-founders of Arduino, announces that today it has acquired 100% ownership of Arduino AG, the corporation which owns all of the Arduino trademarks.

Following the acquisition, Mr. Massimo Banzi becomes the new Chairman and CTO of Arduino. Dr. Fabio Violante will be appointed as the new CEO, replacing Mr. Federico Musto who will pursue other opportunities outside Arduino AG.

“This is the beginning of a new era for Arduino in which we will strengthen and renew our commitment to open source hardware and software, while in parallel setting the company on a sound financial course of sustainable growth. Our vision remains to continue to enable anybody to innovate with electronics for a long time to come,” said Mr Banzi.

“I’m really excited and honoured to join Massimo, the co-founders and the amazing Arduino team as CEO. In the past two years we have worked very hard to get to this point. We envision a future in which Arduino will apply its winning recipe to democratize the Internet of Things for individuals, educators, professionals and businesses,” said Dr. Violante.

NOMNOM is an audiovisual DJ machine

via Arduino Blog

Perhaps you enjoy various flavors of electronic music, and would love to try making your own. Although this seems like a fun idea, after considering the amount of equipment and knowledge that you need to get started, many people simply move on to something else. On the other hand, the NOMNOM machine, seen here, allows you to create tunes visually using YouTube clips as samples.

The device has 16 buttons which can start and stop up to 16 clips displayed via a JavaScript web application. An Arduino Uno takes input from these buttons as well as four potentiometers to modify the clip sounds, and sends the appropriate signals to the computer running the app. There are also four knobs that control the repetition rate, volume, speed and playable length of each selected video. This enables you to make really interesting music without the normally steep learning curve.

For more details, you can check out the project log on Hackaday.io or on GitHub. NOMNOM will also be making an appearance at the World Maker Faire in New York City this fall, so be sure to see it in person if you’re there!

Friday Product Post: Watt’s Up, Doc?

via SparkFun Electronics Blog Posts

Hello, everyone! Thank you for joining us today on this fine Friday. We have a couple of new products to talk about today, including the Watt’s Up Meter, the new SparkFun Arduino Inventor’s Guide and a revision to the MyoWare Cable Shield. It’s a slightly lighter week than the last couple of posts, but there’s still plenty of good stuff. Let’s jump in!

Sorry for the puns…

Watt's Up Meter

PRT-14331
27.95

The Watt’s Up Meter is an all-in-one digital DC ammeter and watt, watt-hour and amp-hour meter. Watt’s Up measures current, voltage and time — and from those measurements calculates peak current, peak power, minimum voltage, power, energy and charge values for you, in real time, for the circuit in which you connect it.

The SparkFun Arduino Inventor's Guide

BOK-14326
29.95

The Arduino microcontroller makes it easy to learn about electronics, but it can be hard to know where to start. The 10 projects in “The SparkFun Arduino Inventor’s Guide” will teach you to build, code and invent with the super-smart Arduino and a handful of parts.

This is the second book we’ve written here at SparkFun. If you are interested, you can find “The SparkFun Guide to Processing” here!


MyoWare Cable Shield

DEV-14109
3.95

Last up today is a revision to the MyoWare Cable Shield. The shield still provides a 3.5mm jack where you can attach a three-electrode sensor cable, allowing you to test and use the MyoWare Muscle Sensor without actually attaching it to your person. But it has been updated to fit better with the other boards in the MyoWare product line.

And that’s it! We hope you enjoy the Watt’s Up — or maybe you need a good summer read and check out our new book. As always, we can’t wait to see what you make with these parts! Shoot us a tweet @sparkfun, or let us know on Instagram or Facebook. We’d love to see what projects you’ve made!

Thanks for stopping by. We’ll see you next week with even more new products!

comments | comment feed

Announcing the Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend 2018

via Raspberry Pi

For the last few years, we have held a big Raspberry Pi community event in Cambridge around Raspberry Pi’s birthday, where people have come together for a huge party with talks, workshops, and more. We want more people to have the chance to join in with our birthday celebrations next year, so we’re going to be coordinating Raspberry Jams all over the world to take place over the Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend, 3–4 March 2018.

Raspberry Pi Big Birthday Weekend 2018. GIF with confetti and bopping JAM balloons

Big Birthday fun!

Whether you’ve run a Raspberry Jam before, or you’d like to start a new Jam in your area, we invite you to join us for our Big Birthday Weekend, wherever you are in the world. This event will be a community-led, synchronised, global mega-Jam in celebration of our sixth birthday and the digital making community! Members of the Raspberry Pi Foundation team will be attending Jams far and wide to celebrate with you during the weekend.

Jams across the world will receive a special digital pack – be sure to register your interest so we can get your pack to you! We’ll also be sending out party kits to registered Jams – more info on this below.

Need help getting started?

First of all, check out the Raspberry Jam page to read all about Jams, and take a look at our recent blog post explaining the support for Jams that we offer.

If there’s no Jam near you yet, the Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend is the perfect opportunity to start one yourself! If you’d like some help getting your Jam off the ground, there are a few places you can get support:

  • The Raspberry Jam Guidebook is full of advice gathered from the amazing people who run Jams in the UK.
  • The Raspberry Jam Slack team is available for Jam organisers to chat, share ideas, and get help from each other. Just email jam [at] raspberrypi.org and ask to be invited.
  • Attend a Jam! Find an upcoming Jam near you, and go along to get an idea of what it’s like.
  • Email us – if you have more queries, you can email jam [at] raspberrypi.org and we’ll do what we can to help.

Raspberry Jam

Get involved

If you’re keen to start a new Jam, there’s no need to wait until March – why not get up and running over the summer? Then you’ll be an expert by the time the Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend comes around. Check out the guidebook, join the Jam Slack, and submit your event to the map when you’re ready.

Like the idea of running a Jam, but don’t want to do it by yourself? Then feel free to email us, and we’ll try and help you find someone to co-organise it.

If you don’t fancy organising a Jam for our Big Birthday Weekend, but would like to celebrate with us, keep an eye on our website for an update early next year. We’ll publish a full list of Jams participating in the festivities so you can find one near you. And if you’ve never attended a Jam before, there’s no need to wait: find one to join on the map here.

Raspberry Jam

Register your interest

If you think you’d like to run a Jam as part of the Big Birthday Weekend, register your interest now, and you’ll be the first to receive updates. Don’t worry if you don’t have the venue or logistics in place yet – this is just to let us know you’re keen, and to give us an idea about how big our party is going to be.

We will contact you in autumn to give you more information, as well as some useful resources. On top of our regular Raspberry Jam branding pack, we’ll provide a special digital Big Birthday Weekend pack to help you celebrate and tell everyone about your Jam!

Then, once you have confirmed you’re taking part, you’ll be able to register your Jam on our website. This will make sure that other people interested in joining the party can find your event. If your Jam is among the first 150 to be registered for a Big Birthday Weekend event, we will send you a free pack of goodies to use on the big day!

Go fill in the form, and we’ll be in touch!

 

PS: We’ll be running a big Cambridge event in the summer on the weekend of 30 June–1 July 2018. Put it in your diary – we’ll say more about it as we get closer to the date.

The post Announcing the Raspberry Jam Big Birthday Weekend 2018 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.