Monthly Archives: October 2019

A self-expanding ESP32 PWM board

via Dangerous Prototypes

Eric Gunnerson writes:

I’ve been working on a little ESP32 expansion board/shield for an LED project I’ve been working on. One of the nice things about the ESP32 is that it has a peripheral known as “LED control” that provides 16 independent channels of PWM for controlling LED brightness, and my project uses that capability.
One of my projects is going to require all 16 channels, so I wanted to do a board that would support 16 channels, but I also wanted a version of the board that would only support 8 channels.

Project info at Eric’s Arcana and RiderX site. It’s also up on Tindie.

Check out the video after the break.

So Close. But Exactly How Close?

via SparkFun: Commerce Blog

There are many reasons why we might need to measure distance or proximity in a project. Obstacle avoidance jumps to mind, of course, but perhaps we want a UAV to maintain a constant elevation over changing terrain. Maybe you want to scan part of a 2000-year-old European castle to create a 3D representation of it. For many applications, LiDAR - Light Detection And Ranging - is the perfect solution. But like everything, it does have potential drawbacks. LiDAR units can be expensive, draw high current and, let’s face it, they shoot lasers. Carelessness could easily lead to a sudden loss of depth perception. With the release of the new LiDAR-Lite v4, Garmin has addressed some of those issues and added some great new features, too.

The new lightweight powerhouse!

One of the cool additions to this version of the LiDAR-Lite is its support for Ultra Low Power (ULP) wireless technologies, including ANT and Bluetooth® 5 LE. ANT can be used to transmit data to a computer or microcontroller as it comes in, while the BLE is for updating the device's software wirelessly. ANT is an ultra-low-power wireless network protocol that can handle peer-to-peer, star, tree and mesh topologies. If you’re not familiar with the ANT wireless protocol, you can get a good idea of the basics here. For a complete look at everything the Garmin LiDAR-Lite v4 is capable of, check out their Operation Manual and Technical Specifications sheet.

Happy hacking!

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The grilled cheese-making robot of your dreams

via Raspberry Pi

Ummm…YES PLEASE!

Cheeseborg: The Grilled Cheese Robot!

More cool stuff at http://www.tabb.me and http://www.evankhill.com Cheeseborg has one purpose: to create the best grilled cheese it possibly can! Cheeseborg is fully automated, voice activated, and easy to move. With Google Assistant SDK integration, Cheeseborg can even be used as a part of your smart home.

Does it use a Raspberry Pi, please?

Sometimes we’ll see a project online and find ourselves hoping and praying that it uses a Raspberry Pi, just so we have a reason to share it with you all.

That’s how it was when I saw Cheeseborg, the grilled cheese robot, earlier this week. “Please, please, please…” I prayed to the robot gods, as I chowed down on a grilled cheese at my desk (true story), and, by the grace of all that is good in this world, my plea was answered.

Cheeseborg: the grilled cheese robot

Cheeseborg uses both an Arduino Mega and a Raspberry Pi 3 in its quest to be the best ever automated chef in the world. The Arduino handles the mechanics, while our deliciously green wonder board runs the Google Assistant SDK, allowing you to make grilled cheese via voice command.

Saying “Google, make me a grilled cheese” will set in motion a series of events leading to the production of a perfectly pressed sammie, ideal for soup dunking or solo snacking.

The robot uses a vacuum lifter to pick up a slice of bread, dropping it onto an acrylic tray before repeating the process with a slice of cheese and then a second slice of bread. Then the whole thing is pushed into a panini press that has been liberally coated in butter spray (not shown for video aesthetics), and the sandwich is toasted, producing delicious ooey-gooey numminess out the other side.

Pareidolia much?

Here at Raspberry Pi, we give the Cheeseborg five slices out of five, and look forward to one day meeting Cheeseborg for real, so we can try out its scrummy wares.

ooooey-gooey numminess

You can find out more about Cheeseborg here.

Toastie or grilled cheese

Yes, there’s a difference: but which do you prefer? What makes them different? And what’s your favourite filling for this crispy, cheesy delight?

The post The grilled cheese-making robot of your dreams appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

BUS PIRATE: pin order and cable colors

via Dangerous Prototypes

The Bus Pirate pinout was supposed to be intuitive, except for one Arduino-like mistake.

Each protocol uses the same pin for similar functions, and the pins used are supposed to “walk” up the row. 1-Wire uses Master Out Slave In (MOSI, pin number 1). I2C uses MOSI (1) and CLOCK (2). UART uses MOSI (1) and Master In Slave Out (MISO, 3). SPI uses MOSI (1), CLOCK (2), MISO(3), and Chip Select (CS,4).

It should have been a nice intuitive progression, except for the unfortunate use of a hideous 2x5pin IDC connector. It’s hard to recall why we used this connector. Probably to keep the board small, provide a keyed connector, and likely because it was in our parts box.

The IDC connector was a poor choice. Not only is it ugly, probes end up using crappy ribbon cable that makes it look even worse. The connector was added without regard for the proper pin order, and used something hard to remember – MISO, CS, MOSI, CLK. Once it was loose in the wild we were stuck with that convention, and that’s how Bus Pirates have been produced for over 10 years!

Bus Pirate Ultra uses a 1x10pin connector called TJC8 2.54mm or 2543 by Chinese suppliers. It’s keyed, but also fits common 2.54mm “DuPont” connectors laying around most workshops. The pinout is DIO1 to DIO8, Vout, and Ground. Each protocol mode is in charge of naming the DIO pins, and the labels are displayed on the LCD above the connector.

We also want to give some thought to the color codes used on the pinout display and probe cables. Typically cable manufacturers stock wire in ten colors: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, gray, white, black, and brown.

Goal one is to make the power and ground pins an intuitive color pair. Black and red, white and black, maybe even red and green. A color pair that a beginner in electronics has probably seen somewhere before.

Goal two is to follow the rainbow. Most people are probably familiar with ROY G BIV, the acronym for the order of colors in a rainbow. We want to start with red and progress downwards in a logical order so that pin one is instantly obvious, and the pins can be identified in a tangled messy probe cable without tracing them back to the source. Indigo and violet colored cable isn’t standard and the colors are hard to tell apart, so they’re usually substituted with purple and brown.

Pin 1 (DIO1) is assigned red. DIO2 to DIO7 are assigned orange, yellow, green, blue, purple and brown. With three colors remaining (gray, black, white), white and black are the obvious choice for the power/ground pin pair. Grey is assigned to DIO8.

Eventually we’ll need to choose good quality wire and some decent probe hooks for the cable. Sigrok, the open source logic analyzer software project, has a good overview of probe hook options. The rest of this week we’ll work on getting the firmware cleaned up and Ultra v1c board routed. As always, you can follow our latest progress in the forum.

Raspberry Pi retro gaming on Reddit

via Raspberry Pi

Reddit was alive with the sound of retro gaming this weekend.

First out to bat is this lovely minimalist, wall-mounted design built by u/sturnus-vulgaris, who states:

I had planned on making a bar top arcade, but after I built the control panel, I kind of liked the simplicity. I mounted a frame of standard 2×4s cut with a miter saw. Might trim out in black eventually (I have several panels I already purchased), but I do like the look of wood.

Next up, a build with Lego bricks, because who doesn’t love Lego bricks?

Just completed my mini arcade cabinet that consists of approximately 1,000 [Lego bricks], a Raspberry Pi, a SNES style controller, Amazon Basics computer speakers, and a 3.5″ HDMI display.

u/RealMagicman03 shared the build here, so be sure to give them an upvote and leave a comment if, like us, you love Raspberry Pi projects that involve Lego bricks.

And lastly, this wonderful use of the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+, proving yet again how versatile the form factor can be.

CM3+Lite cartridge for GPi case. I made this cartridge for fun at first, and it works as all I expected. Now I can play more games l like on this lovely portable stuff. And CM3+ is as powerful as RPi3B+, I really like it.

Creator u/martinx72 goes into far more detail in their post, so be sure to check it out.

What other projects did you see this weekend? Share your links with us in the comments below.

The post Raspberry Pi retro gaming on Reddit appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

App note: Emitters and detectors for infrared (IR) touchscreens

via Dangerous Prototypes

App note from OSRAM about IR LEDs and IR detectors used on touchscreen technologies. Link here (PDF)

Touchscreens as a popular user interface are more and more common. Applications span from public information systems to customer self-service terminals. Thus, as a logical step, more and more devices today feature this kind of user interface, e.g. bank automatic teller machines (ATMs), personal digital assistants (PDAs), mobile phones and PC displays. The widespread popularity is actively supported by standard computer based operating systems, such as e.g. Windows® 7.

The rapid development of CMOS imaging sensors and the development of high power infrared (IR) emitters in slim packages have led to a series of new optical touchscreen technologies. Many of them contain proprietary technology and solutions.