Monthly Archives: May 2020

Embodied Axes is an Arduino-powered controller for 3D imagery and data visualizations in AR

via Arduino Blog

Researchers across several universities have developed a controller that provides tangible interaction for 3D augmented reality data spaces.

The device is comprised of three orthogonal arms, embodying X, Y, and Z axes which extend from a central point. These form an interactive space for 3D objects, with linear potentiometers and a rotary button on each axis as a user interface.

At the heart of it all is an Arduino Mega, which takes in data from the sliders to section a model. This enables users to peer inside of a representation with an AR headset, “slicing off” anything that gets in the way by defining a maximum and minimum view plane. The sliders are each motorized to allow them to move together and to provide force feedback.

Possible applications include medical imaging and CAD modeling, among many others. More details on the Embodied Axes project can be found in the researchers’ paper here.

This robot looks like a ball and transforms itself into a quadruped to move

via Arduino Blog

Gregory Leveque has created an adorable 3D-printed robot that not only walks on four legs, but folds up into a ball when not in use. 

To accomplish this, the round quadruped utilizes one servo to deploy each leg via a parallelogram linkage system and another to move it forwards and backwards. A clever single-servo assembly is also implemented on the bottom to fill gaps left by the legs.

The device is controlled by an Arduino Nano, along with a 16-channel servo driver board. Obstacle avoidance is handled via an ultrasonic sensor, which sticks out of the top half of the sphere and rotates side to side using yet another servo. 

It’s an impressive mechanical build, especially considering its diminutive size of 130mm (5.12in) in diameter.

App note: P-channel power MOSFETs and applications

via Dangerous Prototypes

Another app note from IXYS on P-Channel power MOSFET application. Link here (PDF)

IXYS P-Channel Power MOSFETs retain all the features of comparable N-Channel Power MOSFETs such as very fast switching, voltage control, ease of paralleling and excellent temperature stability. These are designed for applications that require the convenience of reverse polarity operation. They have an n-type body region that provides lower resistivity in the body region and good avalanche characteristics because parasitic PNP transistor is less prone to turn-on. In comparison with Nchannel Power MOSFETs with similar design features, P-channel Power MOSFETs have better FBSOA (Forward Bias Safe Operating Area) and practically immune to Single Event Burnout phenomena. Main advantage of P-channel Power MOSFETs is the simplified gate driving technique in high-side (HS) switch position.

App note: Parallel operation of IGBT discrete devices

via Dangerous Prototypes

Guidelines for parallel operation of IGBT devices discuss in this app note from IXYS. Link here (PDF)

As applications for IGBT components have continued to expand rapidly, semiconductor manufacturers have responded by providing IGBTs in both discrete and modular packages to meet the needs of their customers. Discrete IGBTs span the voltage range of 250V to 1400V and are available up to 75A (DC), which is the maximum current limit for both the TO-247 and TO-264 terminals. IGBT modules cover the same voltage range but, due to their construction, can control currents up to 1000A today. However, on an Ampere per dollar basis, the IGBT module is more expensive so that for cost-sensitive applications, e.g. welding, low voltage motor control, small UPS, etc., designs engineers would like to parallel discrete IGBT devices.

cVert, a truly random MIDI controller

via Dangerous Prototypes

cVert, a truly random MIDI controller @ danny.makesthings.work

cVert is the result of an idea I’ve been kicking around for years, and took a few months of work to bring to fruition. The idea was to use a Geiger counter as a true random number generator to give a non-deterministic input for computer art or music. The result is a MIDI controller with a large amount of control removed – it plays a random musical note every time a radioactive decay is detected.

All files are available on GitHub.

Check out the video after the break.

DIY home made portable oscilloscope

via Dangerous Prototypes

An ATmega328 based portable home made oscilloscope with ADC from Creative Engineering:

It is basically a small scaled digital oscilloscope. It is capable of displaying all type of waveform like sine, triangular, square, etc. It’s bandwidth is above 1 MHz and input impedance is about 600K. The device is mainly using the ATmega328 micro-controller as the heart and is assisted by a high performance ADC (TLC5510) which is capable of taking up-to 20 mega samples per second and thus increasing the span of bandwidth which can be analyzed by our device. In addition to that, in-order to make the device portable Li-ion battery is used , which will be suitable to be fitted into a confined space.

See project details on Creative Engineering blog.

Check out the video after the break: