Monthly Archives: January 2021

Arduino Create Agent 1.2.0 is finally here

via Arduino Blog

It’s been a while since the last release of the Arduino Create Agent.

We tried to give some love to this awesome tool, in order to enhance the experience with the Create ecosystem.

Finally, we have a brand new CI/CD pipeline based on GitHub Actions.

Highlights of this release include:

  • New status bar icon
  • We used gomodules to better handle dependencies
  • Refactor system tray menu
  • UX improvements
  • Now we ship both 32 and 64-bit Windows binaries
  • Added crash report generation
  • Added Virustotal scan to help users with false positives antivirus detections
  • We decided to uniform the naming to “Arduino Create Agent” and remove the mentions to “Plugin” or “Bridge”

If you are interested in the complete changelog, you can find that here.

For the upcoming releases, we will tackle the stability/crash problems. So please help us discover and find bugs by enabling crash report and including it in the GitHub issue.

3pi+ featured in community member’s intro to robotics video series

via Pololu Blog

Customer and forum user Brian Gormanly (known as bg305 on our forum) just released the first video in his new Arduino Lab Series: Introduction to Robotics: Building an Autonomous Mobile Robot. Brian writes, “Throughout this series we will be introducing topics on building and programming an autonomous mobile robot! You can follow along with each lab adding amazing new behaviors to your robot projects and learning the algorithms and tuning techniques that produce incredible robots!”

Brian is using our new 3pi+ 32U4 Robot in his videos and from the first video, it looks like the series will be a great introduction to robotics and the 3pi+! Subscribe to Brian’s channel Coding Coach so you can make sure to catch each video as it is released.

Portenta Vision Shield now available with LoRa® module

via Arduino Blog

What better way to announce the availability of the Portenta Vision Shield LoRa than at The Things Conference 2021 – a global showcase for all the top-notch LoRaWAN products and services.

The LoRa® module option of the Portenta Vision Shield is specifically designed for edge ML applications, enabling low-power, long distance communication over LoRa® wireless protocol and LoRaWAN networks. It’s the perfect addition to the powerful Arduino Portenta H7 which makes possible machine learning on-device, thereby greatly reducing the communication bandwidth requirement in an IoT application.

Always on machine vision – The Portenta Vision Shield comes with an ultra-low-power Himax camera. The camera module autonomously detects motion while the Portenta H7 is in stand-by — only waking up the microcontroller when needed.

Voice and audio event recognition – The Portenta Vision Shield features two ultra-compact and omnidirectional MP34DT06JTR microphones, bringing voice recognition and audio event detection. Both the video and audio data can be stored on an SD card, and transmitted through the LoRa® module to the Arduino IoT Cloud or your own infrastructure.

If you would like to learn how to create LoRa® powered solutions running machine vision algorithms then watch Sebastian Romeo’s workshop at The Things Conference, Thursday 28th January 1.00pm – 1.30pm CET, followed by Q&A at 1.30pm CET. Save 20% off the price of entry to the conference, simply add this code when purchasing a ticket – TTC2021-FRIEND-OF-ARDUINO

The Portenta Vision Shield LoRa® is now available to buy in stock on the Arduino online store  and you can learn more about Arduino’s participation in The Things Conference 2021 here.

This children’s console looks like something straight out of a superhero’s lair

via Arduino Blog

Kids have wonderful imaginations, and to help students at a primary school have a super time, creator “palladin” was asked to construct a console for them to use.

The device features a variety of lights and sci-fi additions, including glowing “reactor” tubes that diffuse light using hair gel and a “memory bank” that emits flashing patterns for a 1950s supercomputer look.

An emergency tracking map blinks randomly via an Arduino Nano, with a possible 18 LED hot spots available per the board’s I/O pins. A palm scanner, described separately here, activates rows of LEDs in sequence using another Arduino. The scanning process is triggered by a light-dependent resistor and voltage divider setup – denying access to any potential bad guys!

This pen plotter draws detailed maps the size of walls

via Arduino Blog

Christopher Getschmann wanted a wall-sized map of the world. He soon realized, however, that it’s tough to actually buy such a map that’s both beautiful and detailed enough to satisfy his cartographic tastes. While many would simply move on to the next “thing,” Getschmann instead took things into his own hands, and built a pen plotter specifically to draw massive 2×3 meter map for his wall.

Getschmann’s CoreXY-configured device is controlled by a dual Arduino Nano setup, with one powering TMC5160 stepper drivers and the other monitoring for stalls. Data from OpenStreetMap is used to produce map sections, which are plotted in SVG format onto eight smaller cardboard sheets, and then combined as tiles into the mega-world map.

Lots more info can be found in Getschmann’s write-up, including links to Python code and board/firmware for the build.

Access control unit designed with a Raspberry Pi CM4 and an Arduino Micro

via Arduino Blog

Whether granting access to public transit or restricting unauthorized personnel in buildings, NFC card readers can be extremely useful. Although most might not consider how they work – and simply happy getting through a turnstile – there’s lot going on behind the scenes.

In his video, Daniel Raines shows off a pair of prototype access control units (ACUs) that he’s constructed. The two networked devices are each based on a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 along with an Arduino Micro that controls six relays to allow or deny entry, provide feedback, fire, and lock up.

More details on the project can be found in Raines’ clip below.