Monthly Archives: June 2022

Name that Ware, June 2022

via Hacking – bunnie's blog

The Ware for June 2022 is shown below.

Thanks to an anonymous benefactor for donating a few of these for this months’ Ware. The board itself is a bit sparse, but, there are some hefty clues regardless. I think there’s a good chance someone will guess it from this image alone. However, I’ve got a few other images in my back pocket in case it turns out to be too hard to guess. Either way, I’ll add them to this post once some guesses are in!

Because the board is so sparse, I thought maybe it would be fun to also dump the contents of the one chip that is on it. Not that it gives any particularly useful hint about what it does, but because it was fairly easy to do; just an SOIC test clip and a Raspberry Pi does the trick:

sudo i2cdump 1 0x50
I will probe file /dev/i2c-1, address 0x50, mode byte
(sample 1)
     0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  a  b  c  d  e  f    0123456789abcdef
00: 00 00 94 4f 00 9e eb 2e c6 0d 12 bf ee 5b 49 2f    ..?O.??.?????[I/
10: 2e 9d 1e 34 f6 30 dd 1a 05 19 df 35 ab 74 df 75    .??4?0?????5?t?u
20: 06 bc 3d e4 f5 fe 7f 2d e6 8b 5b a2 0f 83 6b b5    ??=????-??[???k?
30: 04 7a 3a ae 68 96 5f f8 55 8a ce 3c 91 be 5b c3    ?z:?h?_?U??<??[?
40: e1 07 00 00 00 00 2e 00 0a 19 08 c9 d9 83 50 10    ??......??????P?
50: 13 20 a3 82 01 30 80 9a fd 92 06 3a 06 31 36 35    ? ???0?????:?165
60: 39 34 4a 12 11 9a 01 0e 08 02 15 00 80 88 c5 20    94J????????.???
70: 01 2d 00 00 c8 c3 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ?-..??..........
80: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................
****
f0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................

(sample 2)
     0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  a  b  c  d  e  f    0123456789abcdef
00: 00 00 1c 44 fc 2b 6d 07 02 55 9a fe 0d ed 91 98    ..?D?+m??U??????
10: ab 6b 94 51 db bd 2f cb 93 cc e3 b8 e1 17 14 85    ?k?Q??/?????????
20: 9b 5e 0d fd 6b 18 c2 da 67 a6 73 98 99 cb f4 40    ?^??k???g?s????@
30: 3e ab 40 b4 48 eb aa c2 94 94 49 29 12 93 da 3e    >?@?H?????I)???>
40: f0 08 00 00 00 00 2e 00 0a 19 08 95 e2 83 50 10    ??......??????P?
50: 13 20 a3 82 01 30 80 9a fd 92 06 3a 06 31 36 35    ? ???0?????:?165
60: 39 34 4a 12 11 9a 01 0e 08 02 15 00 80 88 c5 20    94J????????.???
70: 01 2d 00 00 c8 c3 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ?-..??..........
80: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................
****
f0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    ................

It’s always instructive to dump a couple of samples. Without doing any numerical analysis, eyeballing the two dumps side-by-side makes me think whatever drives this is little-endian (given the formatting of some constants in address 0x40 and above), and the data from 0x04-0x40 is probably cryptographic in nature; assuming the implementation didn’t roll their own cipher, it’s probably either an AEAD, or an HMAC. I say this because the first 2-4 bytes from 0x00-0x04 are likely not ciphertext. However, the block size of AES is 16 bytes, so, it’s not any simple block-based encryption scheme, due to the odd 12 bytes or so that are present. However, the format could make sense if 12 bytes served as the nonce for AES-GCM-SIV, and then maybe the last 16 bytes are the authentication tag; that would yield 32 bytes of encrypted, authenticated data, which would be enough for…

…I’ll stop talking there, before I totally give it away!

Winner, Name that Ware May 2022

via Hacking – bunnie's blog

The Ware for May 2022 is a Lenovo Thinkpad Minidock, Type 4338 from back when I had a T520 Thinkpad — circa 2011, about a decade ago. It’s slightly unusual for its time period, because it was probably one of the last brand-name OEM pieces of hardware that featured a parallel port. As a hardware hacker I bemoaned the parallel port’s obsolescence: it was the closest thing we had to standardized GPIOs on a “full sized OS” until the Raspberry Pi. Anyways, I was cleaning out some old hardware and thought it’d be interesting to see what’s inside. Congrats to Matthew for nailing it, email me for your prize!

Hello There, Pico W!

via SparkFun: Commerce Blog

Raspberry Pi is at it again! SparkFun is proud to co-announce and introduce you to the new Raspberry Pi Pico W and Pico H! With this launch, Raspberry Pi expands their RP2040 microcontroller line to include wireless capabilities and headers. Let's jump in and see what exactly is being announced and released today. Let's take a look!

Raspberry Pi Pico W

Raspberry Pi Pico W

DEV-20173
$6.00

The Raspberry Pi Pico W builds upon the great cost-for-performance metrics of the Pico and add WiFi to the board. The Pico W features the same attributes as the Raspberry Pi Pico and also incorporates an Infineon CYW43439 wireless chip. CYW43439 supports IEEE 802.11 b/g/n wireless LAN, and Bluetooth® 5.2. (6/30/2022: Only Wireless LAN is supported on the Pico W at the moment, this will be updated as the new features become available)

The Raspberry Pi Pico line is a low-cost, high-performance microcontroller board with flexible digital interfaces. It feature the RP2040 which marks Raspberry Pi's first microcontroller designed in-house. Pico provides minimal (yet flexible) external circuitry to support the RP2040 chip (Flash, crystal, power supplies and decoupling and USB connector). The majority of the RP2040 microcontroller pins are brought to the user IO pins on the left and right edge of the board. Four RP2040 IO are used for internal functions - driving an LED, on-board Switched Mode Power Supply (SMPS) power control and sensing the system voltages.

Raspberry Pi Pico H

Raspberry Pi Pico H

DEV-20172
$5.00

Meanwhile, the Raspberry Pi Pico H variation is almost exactly like the existing Pico but comes with a set of male headers pre-soldered to all through-hole vias and a 3-pin debug connector. The spacing remains 2.54mm and breadboard compatible (even more so now with the addition of the male headers).

We are, once again, beyond excited to get our hands on the new Raspberry Pi Pico W and Pico H and create new projects, but what do you want to use them for? Are you excited to try making something new with Raspberry Pi's wireless microcontroller? Let us know in the comments below and we'll talk with you again tomorrow with more new products!

 

 

comments | comment feed

App note: Resistor Equipped Transistors (RETs)

via Dangerous Prototypes

Introduction and application of resistor equipped transistors from Nexperia. Link here (PDF)

Bipolar transistors are controlled via the base current applied. Because of high temperature dependency of the voltage drop across the base-emitter path, it is required to add at least a series resistors at the base for stable and safe operation of a transistor in most applications This is required to keep base current at a desired level.
To reduce the number of components and to make board designs less complex, Resistor-Equipped Transistors (RET) have been introduced. These are single or dual transistors with resistors integrated on the same die. The integrated resistors have higher tolerances than commonly used external resistors. This fact makes RETs most suitable for switching applications where the transistor operates either in on-state or off-state. This is the reason also, why RETs are often referred to as digital transistors.

App note: Protecting charger interfaces and typical battery charging topologies

via Dangerous Prototypes

Nexperia’s app note presenting ideas to protect USB port on devices. Link here (PDF)

This application note describes a complete solution for battery charging in mobile devices. This includes how to charge a Li-Ion battery with typical battery charger topologies, particularly with external bypass transistors and ways to effectively protect against overvoltage and overcurrent from the charger connector.

All Aboard the mikroBUS

via SparkFun: Commerce Blog

Hello and welcome, everyone! We are back, yet again, with a handful of new products here at SparkFun Electronics! We've heard your requests for kits for our mikroBUS boards to include a few hookup accessories (specifically Click boards™) so we took both of our boards and made them easier to get started with! Following that, we have a new WiFi HaLow HAT from ALFA Network that we expect to really help your Raspberry Pi get connected to a new type of IoT network. Now, let's jump in and take a closer look at all of this week's new products!


SparkFun MicroMod mikroBUS Starter Kit

SparkFun MicroMod mikroBUS Starter Kit

KIT-19935
$79.95

The SparkFun MicroMod mikroBUS™ Starter Kit is designed to give you just what you need to start using the MicroMod and Click ecosystems side-by-side. The core of this kit is designed around the SparkFun MicroMod mikroBUS™ Carrier Board and the SparkFun MicroMod STM32 Processor, but you will also receive a MIKROE Terminal Click, MIKROE Weather Click, SparkFun Serial Basic Breakout, USB A to C cable, Jumper wires, and a MicroMod screwdriver!


SparkFun RP2040 mikroBUS Starter Kit

SparkFun RP2040 mikroBUS Starter Kit

KIT-19936
$54.95

The SparkFun RP2040 mikroBUS™ Starter Kit is designed to give you just what you need to start using the Click and Qwiic ecosystems side-by-side powered by Raspberry Pi! The core of this kit is designed around the SparkFun RP2040 mikroBUS™ Development Board, the SparkFun Micro OLED Breakout (Qwiic), and the MIKROE Weather Click. Additionally, to connect everything together we also include a 100mm Qwiic Cable, and a USB A-C cable!


ALFA Network WiFi HaLow HAT

ALFA Network WiFi HaLow HAT

WRL-19956
$69.95

The AHPI7292S is the world's first WiFi HaLow™ Raspberry Pi™ HAT module from ALFA Network. Similar to LoRa, WiFi HaLow is a new designation from the WiFi Alliance for 802.11ah technology which operates in the sub-gigahertz range. This brings a more IoT-friendly long-range and Low-power technology to WiFi-style communication. The AHPI7292S brings this wireless technology to the Raspberry Pi form factor with a HAT that works with Raspberry Pi 3B+ and 4 lines. It supports both standalone and host-based modes with up to 15Mbps throughput. An included SDK makes for an excellent getting started experience.


WiFi HaLow Antenna - SMA (915Mhz)

WiFi HaLow Antenna - SMA (915Mhz)

WRL-20115
$9.95

This is a 915MHz SMA Duck Antenna for use with the AHPI7292S WiFi HaLow HAT. We've distinguished it as for use with this HAT as it's an SMA connection where most of our other boards are RP-SMA. It's the easiest way to start working with the WiFi HaLow HAT with meaningful transmission distance.


That's it for this week. As always, we can't wait to see what you make. Shoot us a tweet @sparkfun, or let us know on Instagram, Facebook or LinkedIn. Please be safe out there, be kind to one another, and we'll see you next week with even more new products!

Never miss a new product!

comments | comment feed