Author Archives: Alex Bate

The Pi Who Loved Me

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Fancy yourself as James Bond? In honour of English treasure Roger Moore, we think it’s high time we all became a little more MI5 and a little less MIDoneYet?

James Bond GIF

It’s been a while and M is worried you’re a little…rusty. Best head back to training: go see Q. He has everything you need to get back in shape, both physically and mentally, for the challenges ahead!

Training Camp

Q here, good to have you back.

James Bond Q

First thing’s first: we need to work on your skills and get you ready for your next assignment. Let’s start with your reaction times. This skill is critical in getting you prepared for stealthy situations and averting detection.

Head into my office and grab a Raspberry Pi, LED, and a button to build your own Python Quick Reaction Game. Not only will it help you brush up on your quick thinking, it’ll also teach you how to wire a circuit, use variables, and gather information. This could be key in getting you out of some sticky situations further down the line if you find yourself without one of my gadgets.

James Bond Q

Though speaking of…have you seen our See Like a Bat echolocation device? I’m rather proud of it, even if I do say so myself. Now, even in the darkest of times, you can find your way through any building or maze.

Gathering Intel

We’ll need you to gather some important information for us. But what can you do to make sure no one steals your secret intel? We need you to build a Secret Agent Chat Generator to encrypt information. Once you have completed it, send the information to M via this Morse Code Visual Radio.

Do do this, you’ll need a Morse Code Key. You can find them online or at your local war museum, though they may not care for your taking theirs. But we’re spies. And spies are experts in taking forbidden artefacts. After all, this is what your Laser Tripwire training was for. Oh, you haven’t completed it yet?

James Bond GIF

Well, get to it. Time’s a-wasting!

Locks and Detection

You’re done? Good. Back to the intel.

Until you can find a Morse Code Key, why not hide the information in this Sense HAT Puzzle Box. It’s a wonderful tool to help you learn how to create loops and use conditional statements and functions to create ‘locks’.

You’ll also need to…wait…did you hear that? Someone is listening in, I’m sure of it. Check the Parent Detector to see who is trying to spy on us.

Surveillance

James Bond GIF

Are they gone? Good. Phew, that was a close one. We can’t be so careless in the future. Let’s set up a Raspberry Pi Zero Time-Lapse Camera for constant surveillance of the training camp. You could also attach the camera to your glasses. No one will notice, and you’ll be able to record images of your missions – vital for debriefing.

James Bond seal of approval

Right. That’s all from me. Report back to M for your mission. And remember, this blog post will self-destruct in five…wait, wrong franchise.

Good luck!

Roger Moore GIF

Puns

Other Raspberry Pi/James Bond puns include:

  • Live and Let Pi
  • MoonBaker
  • GoldenPi – Starring Pi-s Brosnan
  • Pifall
  • You Only Live Pi-ce
  • Tomorrow Never Pis
  • Pi Another Day
  • Pi-monds Are Forever
  • For Your Pis Only

Any more?

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Crash Course Computer Science with Carrie Anne Philbin

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Get your teeth into the history of computer science with our Director of Education, Carrie Anne Philbin, and the team at YouTube’s incredible Crash Course channel.

Crash Course Computer Science Preview

Starting February 22nd, Carrie Anne Philbin will be hosting Crash Course Computer Science! In this series, we’re going to trace the origins of our modern computers, take a closer look at the ideas that gave us our current hardware and software, discuss how and why our smart devices just keep getting smarter, and even look towards the future!

The brainchild of Hank and John Green (the latter of whom is responsible for books such as The Fault in Our Stars and all of my resultant heartbroken tears), Crash Course is an educational YouTube channel specialising in courses for school-age tuition support.

As part of the YouTube Orginal Channel Initiative, and with their partners PBS Digital Studios, the team has completed courses in subjects such as physics, hosted by Dr. Shini Somara, astronomy with Phil Plait, and sociology with Nicole Sweeney.

Raspberry Pi Carrie Anne Philbin Crash Course

Oh, and they’ve recently released a new series on computer science with Carrie Anne Philbin , whom you may know as Raspberry Pi’s Director of Education and the host of YouTube’s Geek Gurl Diaries.

Computer Science with Carrie Anne

Covering topics such as RAM, Boolean logic, CPU design , and binary, the course is currently up to episode twelve of its run. Episodes are released every Tuesday, and there are lots more to come.

Crash Course Carrie Anne Philbin Raspberry Pi

Following the fast-paced, visual style of the Crash Course brand, Carrie Anne takes her viewers on a journey from early computing with Lovelace and Babbage through to the modern-day electronics that power our favourite gadgets such as tablets, mobile phones, and small single-board microcomputers…

The response so far

A few members of the Raspberry Pi team recently attended VidCon Europe in Amsterdam to learn more about making video content for our community – and also so I could exist in the same space as the Holy Trinity, albeit briefly.

At VidCon, Carrie Anne took part in an engaging and successful Women in Science panel with Sally Le Page, Viviane Lalande, Hana Shoib, Maddie Moate, and fellow Crash Course presenter Dr. Shini Somara. I could see that Crash Course Computer Science was going down well from the number of people who approached Carrie Anne to thank her for the course, from those who were learning for the first time to people who were rediscovering the subject.

Crash Course Carrie Anne Philbin Raspberry Pi

Take part in the conversation

Join in the conversation! Head over to YouTube, watch Crash Course Computer Science, and join the discussion in the comments.

Crash Course Carrie Anne Philbin Raspberry Pi

You can also follow Crash Course on Twitter for release updates, and subscribe on YouTube to get notifications of new content.

Oh, and who can spot the sneaky Raspberry Pi in the video introduction?

“Cheers!”

Crash Course Computer Science Outtakes

In which Carrie Anne presents a new sing-a-long format and faces her greatest challenge yet – signing off an episode. Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter – http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr – http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV We’ve got merch!

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#CharityTuesday: Code Club for libraries

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Code Clubs aren’t just for the schoolroom, as today’s blog post shows. With the third video in our #CharityTuesday coverage, we shed some light on running a Code Club in a library environment. To offer a little more information on the themes of each video, we’ll be releasing #CharityTuesday blog posts for each of our new Code Club videos.

Code Club for libraries

We visited Tile Hill Library to find out more about their Code Club, and how easy it can be for libraries to start their own Code Clubs.

The potential of Code Clubs in libraries

There are growing numbers of Code Clubs being set up in public venues such as libraries. We visited Tile Hill Library to find out more about their Code Club, and how easy it can be for libraries to start their own Code Clubs.

Across the world, more and more Code Clubs are running in venues like libraries, offering a great space for children from all local schools to come together. The library setting helps the children to meet new people and expand their experiences with peers from different communities. Furthermore, it offers a wider scope for club times, as many public libraries are also open at weekends.

Code Club Library

At Tile Hill Library, they run an after school Code Club for one hour each week with the help of volunteers from the local area.

This out-of-school environment comes with its own unique challenges and rewards. “The greatest challenge for our Code Club is also our greatest triumph,” explains Charmain Osborne, Assistant Library Manager at Ipswich County Library. “The club has been more popular than I imagined. The waiting list continues to grow faster than we can create spaces in our club!”

Code Club Library Robot graphic

Increase volunteer opportunities

By running a Code Club outside of school hours, you also increase your opportunity for volunteers. “In the first instance, the Code Club website is a good resource for finding a local volunteer. I’d definitely recommend Saturday as the day to run the club. Many more IT professionals will be free on that day,” advises Paul Sinnett, who runs a Code Club in the Croydon Central Library.

Get involved in Code Club!

Code Club is a nationwide network of volunteer-led after-school coding clubs for children. It offers a great place for children of all abilities to learn and build upon their skills amongst like-minded peers.

There are currently over 10,000 active Code Clubs across the world and official Code Club communities in ten countries. If you want to find out more, visit the Code Club UK website. Check out Code Club International if you are outside of the UK.

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#CharityTuesday: Code Club in Scotland

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Continuing the coverage of our new Code Club videos on YouTube, here’s our second #CharityTuesday blog post. To offer a little more information on the themes of each video, we’ll be releasing #CharityTuesday blog posts for each of our new Code Club videos. This time, we are covering the amazing success of Code Clubs in Scotland.

Code Club in Scotland

Thanks to Digital Xtra, which provided a grant for the making of this film. Digital Xtra is funded by the Scottish Government’s Digital Scotland Business Excellence Partnership. Thanks also to the School of Computing at the University of Dundee for providing the venue for the film!

Learn more about Code Club in Scotland

Clubs in Scotland, inspiring the next generation to get excited about coding and digital making. Thanks to Digital Xtra, which provided a grant for the making of this film. Digital Xtra is funded by the Scottish Government Digital Skills Business Excellence Partnership. Thanks also to Computing at the University of Dundee for providing the venue for the film!

From the remotest regions to the busiest cities, we’ve proudly witnessed Code Club’s presence grow in bounds across Scotland. “Our remotest clubs are in Shetland and Orkney. There’s even one in Barra,” explains Lorna Gibson, Code Club’s Scotland Coordinator. “The regional flight lands on the beach at low tide: it’s so awesome,” she adds. Despite the difficulty in accessing some of the furthest regions of the country, nothing will stop people getting through.

Katie Motion Code Club Scotland Raspberry Pi

I am not particularly skilled at coding. I didn’t have a lot of knowledge myself, but I felt like it was something that I could actually learn along with the children and I wanted to challenge myself.
– Katie Motion

“It is 405 miles from my most northerly club to my most southerly one, and about 215 miles from my most easterly and most westerly,” Lorna continues, before detailing the increase in club numbers we’ve seen over the last few years. “We now have 480 clubs (this has grown from 40-ish since August 2014) and we have clubs in all 32 sub-regions of Scotland.”

With such impressive numbers, plus the wonderful stories we hear from volunteers and students, you can see why we’re excited about our growing presence in Scotland.

David McDonald Code Club Scotland Raspberry Pi

One of the most rewarding things I’ve seen with Code Club is that there will often be children who come by themselves. They don’t know anybody else and they’re just as willing to help out people that they don’t know.
– David McDonald

Get involved in Code Club!

Code Club is a nationwide network of volunteer-led after-school coding clubs for children. It offers a great place for children of all abilities to learn and build upon their skills amongst like-minded peers.

There are currently over 10,000 active Code Clubs across the world, and official Code Club communities in ten countries. If you want to find out more, visit the Code Club UK website. Please visit Code Club International if you are outside of the UK.

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#CharityTuesday: What do kids say about Code Club?

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We’ve recently released a series of new Code Club videos on our YouTube channel. These range from advice on setting up your own Code Club to testimonials from kids and volunteers. To offer a little more information on the themes of each video, we’ll be releasing #CharityTuesday blog posts for each, starting with the reason for it all: the kids.

What do kids say about Code Club?

The team visited Liverpool Central Library to find out what the children at their Code Club think about the club and its activities, and what they’re taking away from attending.

“It makes me all excited inside…”

Code Clubs are weekly after-school coding clubs for 9 – 11 year olds. Children learn to create games, animations and websites using our specially created resources, with the support of awesome volunteers. We visited Liverpool Central Library to find out what the children at their Code Club think about their coding club.

We love to hear the wonderful stories of exploration and growth from the kids that attend Code Clubs. The changes our volunteers see in many of their club members are both heart-warming and extraordinary.

Code Club kids two girls at Code Club

“It makes me all excited inside.”

“There’s a lad who comes to my club who was really not confident about coding. He said he was rubbish at maths and such when he first started,” explains Dan Powell, Code Club Regional Coordinator for the South East. “After he’d done a couple of terms he told us, ‘Tuesday is my favourite day now because I get to come to Code Club: it makes my brain feel sparkly.’ He’s now writing his own adventure game in Scratch!”

Code Club kids

“I think the best part of it is being able to interact with other people and to share ideas on projects.”

“I love the sentiments at the end of this advert a couple of my newbies made in Scratch,” continues Lorna Gibson, Regional Coordinator for Scotland. “The bit where they say that nobody is left behind and everyone has fun made me teary.”

Here is their wonderful Scratch advert:

Get involved in Code Club!

Code Club is a nationwide network of volunteer-led after-school coding clubs for children. It offers a great place for children of all abilities to learn and build upon their skills amongst like-minded peers.

There are currently over 10,000 active Code Clubs across the world and official Code Club communities in ten countries. If you want to find out more, visit the Code Club UK website, or Code Club International if you are outside of the UK.

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Community Profile: Jillian Ogle

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This column is from The MagPi issue 53. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free, or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

Let’s Robot streams twice a week, Tuesdays and Thursdays, and allows the general public to control a team of robots within an interactive set, often consisting of mazes, clues, challenges, and even the occasional foe. Users work together via the Twitch.tv platform, sending instructions to the robots in order to navigate their terrain and complete the set objectives.

Let's Robot Raspberry Pi Jillian Ogle

Let’s Robot aims to change the way we interact with television, putting the viewer in the driving seat.

Aylobot, the first robot of the project, boasts a LEGO body, while Ninabot, the somewhat 2.0 upgrade of the two, has a gripper, allowing more interaction from users. Both robots have their own cameras that stream to Twitch, so that those in control can see what they’re up to on a more personal level; several new additions have joined the robot team since then, each with their own unique skill.

Let's Robot Raspberry Pi Jillian Ogle

Twice a week, the robots are controlled by the viewers, allowing them the chance to complete tasks such as force-feeding the intern, attempting to write party invitations, and battling in boss fights.

Jillian Ogle

Let’s Robot is the brainchild of Jillian Ogle, who originally set out to make “the world’s first interactive live show using telepresence robots collaboratively controlled by the audience”. However, Jill discovered quite quickly that the robots needed to complete the project simply didn’t exist to the standard required… and so Let’s Robot was born.

After researching various components for the task, Jill decided upon the Raspberry Pi, and it’s this small SBC that now exists within the bodies of Aylobot, Ninabot, and the rest of the Let’s Robot family.

Let's Robot Jillian Ogle Raspberry Pi

“Post-Its I drew for our #LetsRobot subscribers. We put these in the physical sets made for the robots. I still have a lot more to draw…”

In her previous life, Jill worked in art and game design, including a role as art director for Playdom, a subsidiary of Disney Interactive; she moved on to found Aylo Games in 2013 and Let’s Robot in 2015. The hardware side of the builds has been something of a recently discovered skill, with Jill admitting, “Anything I know about hardware I’ve picked up in the last two years while developing this project.”

This was my first ever drone flight, live on #twitch. I think it went well. #letsrobot #robot #robotics #robots #drone #drones #twitchtv #twitchcreative #twitchplays #fail #livestream #raspberrypi #arduino #hardware #mechatronics #mechanicalengineering #makersgonnamake #nailedit #make #electronics

73 Likes, 3 Comments – Jillian Ogle (@letsjill) on Instagram: “This was my first ever drone flight, live on #twitch. I think it went well. #letsrobot #robot…”

Social media funtimes

More recently, as Let’s Robot continues to grow, Jill can be found sharing the antics of the robots across social media, documenting their quests – such as the hilarious attempt to create party invites and the more recent Hillarybot vs Trumpbot balloon head battle, where robots with extendable pin-mounted arms fight to pop each other’s head.

Last night was the robot presidential debate, and here is an early version of candidate #Trump bot. #letsrobot #robotics #robot #raspberrypi #twitch #twitchtv #twitchplays #3dprinting #mechatronics #arduino #iot #robots #crafting #make #battlebots #hardware #twitchcreative #presidentialdebate2016 #donaldtrump #electronics #omgrobots #adafruit #silly

400 Likes, 2 Comments – Jillian Ogle (@letsjill) on Instagram: “Last night was the robot presidential debate, and here is an early version of candidate #Trump bot….”

Gotta catch ’em all

Alongside the robots, Jill has created several other projects that both add to the interactive experience of Let’s Robot and comment on other elements of social trends out in the world. Most notably, there is the Pokémon Go Robot, originally a robot arm that would simulate the throw of an on-screen Poké Ball. It later grew wheels and took to the outside world, hunting down its pocket monster prey.

Let's Robot Pokemon Go Raspberry Pi

Originally sitting on a desk, the Pokémon Go Robot earned itself a new upgrade, gaining the body of a rover to allow it to handle the terrain of the outside world. Paired with the Livestream Goggles, viewers can join in the fun.

It’s also worth noting other builds, such as the WiFi Livestream Goggles that Jill can be seen sporting across several social media posts. The goggles, with a Pi camera fitted between the wearer’s eyes, allow viewers to witness Jill’s work from her perspective. It’s a great build, especially given how open the Let’s Robot team are about their continued work and progression.

Let's Robot Pokemon Go Raspberry Pi

The WiFi-enabled helmet allows viewers the ability to see what Jill sees, offering a new perspective alongside the Let’s Robot bots. The Raspberry Pi camera fits perfectly between the eyes, bringing a true eye level to the viewer. She also created internet-controlled LED eyebrows… see the video!

And finally, one project we are eager to see completed is the ‘in production’ Pi-powered transparent HUD. By incorporating refractive acrylic, Jill aims to create a see-through display that allows her to read user comments via the Twitch live-stream chat, without having to turn her eyes to a separate monitor

Since the publication of this article in The MagPi magazine, Jill and the Let’s Robot team have continued to grow their project. There are some interesting and exciting developments ahead – we’ll cover their progress in a future blog.

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