Author Archives: Arduino Team

Keep your pool under control with ARDUPOOL

via Arduino Blog

Having a pool can be a great way to relax during the summer, but keeping the water crystal clear and safe to swim in can be a challenge. To help, engineer Diego has developed the Arduino Mega-powered ARDUPOOL, which is now crowdfunding on Kickstarter.

This modular, open source device is capable of controlling up to four peristaltic pumps for dosing chlorine and other chemicals, as well as the filtration system. Programming is done via a simple LCD screen on the front, along with three buttons.

Depending on the setup, ARDUPOOL can either run the pool on a schedule, or be automated based on pH and chlorine sensors. Further functionality for lighting and app control is also in the works. Reward pledge levels vary from €149 (~$176 USD) for a Basic Kit to €399 (~$468 USD) for an assembled ARDUPOOL Super.

Bring two analog meters out of retirement to display temperature and humidity

via Arduino Blog

Tom of Build Comics created a unique analog weather station that shows temperature and humidity on a pair of recycled gauges. An Arduino Nano reads the levels using a DHT22 sensor and outputs them in the proper format for each display.

Both units have a new printed paper backing to indicate conditions, along with a trimmer pot for calibration. To set the build off nicely, the Nano and other electronics are housed inside a beautiful custom wooden box, to which the antique meters are also affixed.

Code and additional information for the project is available on GitHub, while a short demo of the gauges can be seen below.

Chicken coop door automation with Arduino

via Arduino Blog

When Geert Wanten’s wife got tired of opening up the chicken coop to let them out in the morning, he decided to automate the situation using an Arduino Nano.

Wanten’s DIY system calculates the sunup/sundown via info from a DS1307 RTC module, pulling the door up with a gearmotor and a spool of fishing line. When it’s time to drop the door and close things up, the motor is reversed, keeping the chickens safe at night.

Magnetic sensors are implemented to tell the door state, and there’s a manual down switch that releases the door when activated, then goes into normal operation when flipped back.

Code for the project is available in Wanten’s write-up, and you can see it demonstrated in the video below.

The Science Journal is graduating from Google — coming to Arduino this fall!

via Arduino Blog

This post was written by Valentina Chinnici, Arduino Product Manager.

Arduino and Google are excited to announce that the Science Journal app will be transferring from Google to Arduino this September! Arduino’s existing experience with the Science Journal and a long-standing commitment to open source and hands-on science has been crucial to the transfer ownership of the open source project over to Arduino.  

The Google versions of the app will officially cease support and updates on December 11th, 2020, with Arduino continuing all support and app development moving forward, including a brand new Arduino integration for iOS. 

Arduino Science Journal will include support for the Arduino Nano 33 BLE Sense board, as well as the Arduino Science Kit, with students able to document science experiments and record observations using their own Android or iOS device. The Science Journal actively encourages students to learn outside of the classroom, delivering accessible resources to support both teachers and students for remote or in person activities. For developers, the Arduino version will continue to be open: codes, APIs, and firmware to help them create innovative new projects.

“Arduino’s heritage in both education and open source makes us the ideal partner to take on and develop the great work started by Google with the Science Journal,” commented Fabio Violante, Arduino CEO. “After all, Arduino has been enabling hands-on learning experiences for students and hobbyists since they were founded in 2005. Our mission is to shape the future of the next generation of STEAM leaders, and allow them to have a more equitable and affordable access to complete, hands-on, and engaging learning experiences, in line with UN Sustainable Goals of Quality Education.”

In 2019, we released the Arduino Science Kit, an Arduino-based physics lab that’s fully compatible with the Science Journal. Moving forward, all new updates to the app will take place through Arduino’s new version of the Science Journal, available in September. 

The new Arduino version of the app will still be free and open to let users measure the world around them using the capabilities built into their phone, tablet, and Chromebook. Furthermore, Arduino will be providing better integration between the Science Journal and existing Arduino products and education programs. 

Stay tuned for Arduino’s version of the Science Journal, coming to iOS and Android in September 2020!

Arduino X-ray imaging phantom simulates lung movement

via Arduino Blog

Imaging phantoms are used to evaluate and test medical devices, such as X-ray machinery, where a human subject would be impractical and/or dangerous. In order to simulate the motion and deformation of a lung, Stefan Grimm created an Arduino-powered phantom at a materials cost of around $350 USD.

Much of the project’s structure is printed with dissolvable PVA, used as a form for silicone that mimics tissue and plaster for bone. Movement is controlled via three linear and rotary actuator setups outlined here, and the structure can either be pre-programmed or manipulated in real-time using a USB cable and PC.

You can see a simulation of the setup in the video below, tracking target objects as they move along with cylinders that represent respiratory motion.

This stepper-driven mechanical clock can be set to two different time zones

via Arduino Blog

Clocks normally tell you the time in your particular location, but what about that person that you know across the country or even on the other side the world? What time is it there? While it’s easy enough to do a web search or do a calculation, in order to find this out at an instant, Jeremy Cook made his own mechanical dual time zone clock.

The device is powered by an Arduino Nano, which drives a stepper motor to advance each minute. Using physical gear reduction, dual hour gears move at 1/12th the rate of the minute indicator gear, which can be offset to the secondary time zone of your choosing.

A real-time clock module is implemented to trigger each stepper advance, and a single button fast forwards the assembly when needed. Code, while still in a somewhat experimental state, is available on GitHub.