Author Archives: DP

JesFs – Jo’s Embedded Serial File system

via Dangerous Prototypes

suchende tipped us to the small File system for NOR flash:

The main problem for “very small devices” – until now – was the “File System”: everybody knows “FAT”, “NTFS”, … but have you ever thought of a file system on a small chip? Or even inside of a CPU? No problem, with the right Software. This is why I wrote
“JesFs – Jo’s Embedded Serial File System“

Thanks suchende! Via the forum.

Free PCB Sunday: Pick your PCB

via Dangerous Prototypes

BP-600x373

We go through a lot of prototype PCBs, and end up with lots of extras that we’ll never use. Every Sunday we give away a few PCBs from one of our past or future projects, or a related prototype. Our PCBs are made through Seeed Studio’s Fusion board service. This week two random commenters will get a coupon code for the free PCB drawer tomorrow morning. Pick your own PCB. You get unlimited free PCBs now – finish one and we’ll send you another! Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times every week:

Some stuff:

  • Yes, we’ll mail it anywhere in the world!
  • Be sure to use a real e-mail in the address field so we can contact you with the coupon.
  • Limit one PCB per address per month please.
  • Like everything else on this site, PCBs are offered without warranty.
  • PCBs are scrap and have no value, due to limited supply it is not possible to replace a board lost in the post

Be the first to comment, subscribe to the RSS feed.

Linear Nixie tube HAT for the Raspberry Pi

via Dangerous Prototypes

Mark Smith has been working on a HAT for the Raspberry Pi that can drive two IN-9 or IN-13 linear Nixie tubes:

This project as described in www.surfncircuits.com came about because I needed a retro looking linear meter for my espresso maker water tank. I’m always running out of water in my espresso maker, and a cool display letting me know how much water is left and to let me know when to fill it up is definitely needed. In this project, I’ll create a HAT for the Raspberry Pi that can drive two IN-9 or IN-13 linear Nixie tubes. While I’m using this HAT as a single water meter display, this same linear display would be great for showing temperature, bar graphs, audio VU meters, even surf heights by days of the week. The Nixie Tube Power Supply, designed in an earlier blog will work perfectly to drive up to four of the IN-13 Nixie tubes or one IN-9 Nixie tube.

More details on surfncircuits blog and the GitHub repository here.

#FreePCB via Twitter to 2 random RTs

via Dangerous Prototypes

Every Tuesday we give away two coupons for the free PCB drawer via Twitter. This post was announced on Twitter, and in 24 hours we’ll send coupon codes to two random retweeters. Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times a every week:

  • Hate Twitter and Facebook? Free PCB Sunday is the classic PCB giveaway. Catch it every Sunday, right here on the blog
  • Tweet-a-PCB Tuesday. Follow us and get boards in 144 characters or less
  • Facebook PCB Friday. Free PCBs will be your friend for the weekend

Some stuff:

  • Yes, we’ll mail it anywhere in the world!
  • Check out how we mail PCBs worldwide video.
  • We’ll contact you via Twitter with a coupon code for the PCB drawer.
  • Limit one PCB per address per month please.
  • Like everything else on this site, PCBs are offered without warranty.

We try to stagger free PCB posts so every time zone has a chance to participate, but the best way to see it first is to subscribe to the RSS feed, follow us on Twitter, or like us on Facebook.



4 Port high power USB hub

via Dangerous Prototypes

Dilshan Jayakody has published a new build:

In the last couple of years, I tried several powered USB hubs to drive some development boards and USB peripherals. Most of the USB hubs which we can find in the local market are unreliable or not designed to drive more than 500mA of a load.
After having a few bad experiences with powered USB hubs, I decided to build a USB hub by myself. I specifically design this hub to drive USB powered development boards and experimental peripherals.

See the full post on his blog.

App note: Emitters and detectors for infrared (IR) touchscreens

via Dangerous Prototypes

App note from OSRAM about IR LEDs and IR detectors used on touchscreen technologies. Link here (PDF)

Touchscreens as a popular user interface are more and more common. Applications span from public information systems to customer self-service terminals. Thus, as a logical step, more and more devices today feature this kind of user interface, e.g. bank automatic teller machines (ATMs), personal digital assistants (PDAs), mobile phones and PC displays. The widespread popularity is actively supported by standard computer based operating systems, such as e.g. Windows® 7.

The rapid development of CMOS imaging sensors and the development of high power infrared (IR) emitters in slim packages have led to a series of new optical touchscreen technologies. Many of them contain proprietary technology and solutions.