Author Archives: DP

App note: Core independent voltage window signal detection using a single comparator

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Presenting the usage of Core independent paripheral of PICs in this app note from Microchip. Link here (PDF)

It is possible to find out whether a measured signal is below or above a certain value/reference using a single comparator. But, what if the desired interval is between two values, the undervoltage and overvoltage protection?

The most convenient and fastest solution is to use two comparators and two references. The results are analyzed to decide which of the three intervals houses the measured signal. Using an Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) and core post-processing will yield the same result, but the process is slower and dependent on core availability.

App note: Power supply rejection ratio of low dropout voltage regulators

via Dangerous Prototypes

an_microchip_AN3018

Here’s an app note about PSRR of LDO from Microchip. Link here (PDF)

The Power Supply Rejection Ratio is the ability of a device, such as a Low Dropout Voltage regulator, to reject the various perturbations that can be found in its input supply rail by providing a greatly attenuated signal at the output. Generally, the main source of the perturbation will be the output ripple of the DC/DC converters that typically power LDOs.

High PSRR LDOs are recommended for powering line ripple sensitive devices such as: RF applications, ADCs/DACs, FPGAs, MPUs, and audio applications.

One important clarification must be made: PSRR is NOT the same with output noise. PSRR is a measure of rejection. It shows what the part will output based on the given input.

A development board for an STM32G081 MCU

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Andy Brown designed and built an STM32G081 development board:

I’ve been an avid user of ST’s F0 series ever since it was launched. The 48MHz Cortex M0 is almost always the perfect MCU for every project that I tend to build and it’s so easy to program and debug that, for me, it’s the default answer to ‘which MCU should I use for this project?’ So when I noticed that ST had launched a ‘G0’ range I just had to have a closer look.

See the detailed writeup and download the Gerber files on Andy’s Workshop.

Check out the video after the break.

Build an ESP8266 web server – Code and schematics (NodeMCU)

via Dangerous Prototypes

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A detailed instructions of how to build an ESP8266 Web Server using NodeMCU firmware:

This tutorial is a step-by-step guide that shows how to build a standalone ESP8266 Web Server that controls two outputs (two LEDs). This ESP8266 NodeMCU Web Server is mobile responsive and it can be accessed with any device with a browser in your local network.

Via Random Nerd Tutorials.

Check out the video after the break.

App note: Capacitive sensing: Direct vs remote liquid-level sensing performance analysis

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Capacitive liquid level sensing method comparison discussed in this app note from Texas Instruments. Link here (PDF)

Capacitive-based liquid level sensing is making its way into the consumer, industrial, and automotive markets due to its system sensitivity, flexibility, and low cost. With using TI’s capacitive sensing technology, the system flexibility allows designers to have the choice of placing the sensors directly on the container (direct sensing) or in close proximity to the container (remote sensing). Each configuration has its own advantages and disadvantages. This application note highlights the system differences and performance of direct and remote sensing to provide guidance in how capacitive-based liquid-level sensing is affected.

App note: Measuring liquid levels using hall effect sensors

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App note from Infineon on methods used in liquid level measurement and how contactless hall effect sensors are the right choice for the job. Link here (PDF)

This application note is dedicated to liquid level sensing using non-contacting magnetic sensor technology. First, an overview of some liquid level sensor application requirements are given. Next, we will introduce some of the solutions that are employed today and are researched for future systems, including both contacting techniques as well as non-contacting methods. Magnetic sensing turns out to be a comparably easy and robust solution to tackle the problem and Infineon’s linear Hall sensor portfolio is presented. Different design aspects of a magnetic liquid level sensor, including magnetic circuit designs, are discussed. The last section introduces some of Infineon’s Hall effect sensors that are suitable for use in fuel level sensing.