Author Archives: Eben Upton

A birthday gift: 2GB Raspberry Pi 4 now only $35

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TL;DR: it’s our eighth birthday, and falling RAM prices have allowed us to cut the price of the 2GB Raspberry Pi 4 to $35. You can buy one here.

Happy birthday to us

In two days’ time, it will be our eighth birthday (or our second, depending on your point of view). Many of you set your alarms and got up early on the morning of 29 February 2012, to order your Raspberry Pi from our newly minted licensee partners, RS Components and Premier Farnell. In the years since, we’ve sold over 30 million Raspberry Pi computers; we’ve seen our products used in an incredible range of applications all over the world (and occasionally off it); and we’ve found our own place in a community of makers, hobbyists, engineers and educators who are changing the world, one project, or one student, at a time.

The first Raspberry Pi

When we first started talking about Raspberry Pi 1 Model B back in 2011, we were very clear about what we were trying to build: a desktop Linux PC with interfacing capabilities for $35. At the time, it seemed obvious that our low price point would come with compromises. Even though you could use your Raspberry Pi 1 to watch HD video, or play Quake 3, or compile the Linux kernel, or automate a factory, some things – like browsing modern, JavaScript-heavy websites – were out of reach.

Our very first website led with an early prototype running an Ubuntu 9.04 desktop

Improving performance

Every subsequent product – from quad-core Raspberry Pi 2 in 2015, to 64-bit Raspberry Pi 3 in 2016, to Raspberry Pi 3+ in 2018 – whittled down those compromises a little further. By offering steadily increasing processing power at a time when the performance of traditional PCs had begun to stagnate, we were gradually able to catch up with typical PC use cases. With each generation, more people were able to use a Raspberry Pi as their daily-driver PC.

The Raspberry Pi I’d buy for my parents

Until, in June of last year, we launched Raspberry Pi 4. Roughly forty times faster than the original Raspberry Pi, for the first time we have a no-compromises PC for the majority of users. I’ve described Raspberry Pi 4 as “the Raspberry Pi I’d buy for my parents”, and since I bought them a Desktop Kit for Christmas they’ve found it to be basically indistinguishable in performance and functionality from other PCs.

In a sense, this was a “mission accomplished” moment. But Raspberry Pi 4 brought its own compromises: for the first time we couldn’t fit as much memory as we wanted into the base product. While the $35 1GB device makes a great media player, home server, or embedded controller, to get the best desktop experience you need at least 2GB of RAM. At launch this would have cost you $45.

Dropping the price of 2GB

Which brings us to today’s announcement. The fall in RAM prices over the last year has allowed us to cut the price of the 2GB variant of Raspberry Pi 4 to $35. Effective immediately, you will be able to buy a no-compromises desktop PC for the same price as Raspberry Pi 1 in 2012. In comparison to that original machine, we offer:

  • 40× the CPU performance
  • 8× the memory
  • 10× the I/O bandwidth
  • 4× the number of pixels on screen
  • Two screens instead of one
  • Dual-band wireless networking

And of course, thanks to inflation, $35 in 2012 is equivalent to nearly $40 today. So effectively you’re getting all these improvements, and a $5 price cut.

We’re going to keep working to make Raspberry Pi a better desktop computer. But this feels like a great place to be, eight years in. We hope you’ve enjoyed the first eight years of our journey as much as we have: here’s to another eight!

FAQs

Is this a permanent price cut?

Yes.

What about the 1GB product?

In line with our commitment to long-term support, the 1GB product will remain available to industrial and commercial customers, at a list price of $35. As there is no price advantage over the 2GB product, we expect most users to opt for the larger-memory variant.

What about the 4GB product?

The 4GB variant of Raspberry Pi 4 will remain on sale, priced at $55.

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Vulkan is coming to Raspberry Pi: first triangle

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Following on from our recent announcement that Raspberry Pi 4 is OpenGL ES 3.1 conformant, we have some more news to share on the graphics front. We have started work on a much requested feature: an open-source Vulkan driver!

Vulkan

Standards body Khronos describes Vulkan as “a new generation graphics and compute API that provides high-efficiency, cross-platform access to modern GPUs”. The Vulkan API has been designed to better accommodate modern GPUs and address common performance bottlenecks in OpenGL, providing graphics developers with new means to squeeze the best performance out of the hardware.

First triangle

The “first triangle” image is something of a VideoCore graphics tradition: while I arrived at Broadcom too late to witness the VideoCore III version, I still remember the first time James and Gary were able to get a flawless, single-tile, RGB triangle out of VideoCore IV in simulation. So, without further ado, here’s the VideoCore VI Vulkan version.

First triangle out of Vulkan

Before you get too excited, remember that this is just the start of the development process for Vulkan on Raspberry Pi. Igalia has only been working on this new driver for a few weeks, and we still have a very long development roadmap ahead of us before we can put an actual driver in the hands of our users. So don’t hold your breath, and instead look forward to more news from us and Igalia as they make further development progress.

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Code the Classics on sale now

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TL;DR: we made a fully automated luxury gay space communist type-in-listing book. Buy it now and get it in time for Christmas.

Code the Classics cover

Back in the dawn of time, in the late 1980s, I grew up on a diet of type-in computer game listings. From the BBC Micro User Guide, to The Micro User magazine, to the ubiquitous Usborne books: an hour or two of painstaking copying and a little imagination would provide you with an experience which wasn’t a million miles away from what you could buy on the shelves of your local computer store.

Can you believe they did “Machine Code for Beginners”?

The simple act of typing in a game helped to familiarise you with a programming language (usually a dialect of BASIC), and by making mistakes you could start to understand what other, more intentional changes might accomplish. Some of the earliest games I wrote started off as heavily modified versions of type-in listings; in fact, one of these made a sneaky reappearance on this blog last year.

Fast forward to the present day, and aside from regular appearances in our own MagPi and Wireframe magazines, type-in listings have faded from view. Commercial games, even casual ones, have become much more sophisticated, beyond what you might expect to be able to enter into a computer in a reasonable amount of time. At the same time, tools like Unity remove the need to develop every title from the ground up.

But there’s still a lot to be said for the immediacy of the type-in experience. Three years ago, we asked ourselves whether we could make a type-in game listing book for the modern era. The end result, of which we’re launching the first volume today, is Code the Classics. David Crookes and Liz Upton will take you behind the scenes of the creation of five classic arcade games, and then I’ll show you how to implement a simple Python game inspired by each one.

Cavern

Substitute Soccer

Developing retro arcade games has been a hobby of mine since those early BBC Micro days, and I spent many happy evenings developing these titles, ably assisted by Andrew Gillett and Sean Tracey. It was important to us that these games be as close as possible to the standard of modern commercial casual games. With this in mind, we invited Dan Malone, famous among many other things for his work with The Bitmap Brothers, to provide graphics, and long-time game audio pro Allister Brimble to provide music and sound effects. I’ve known Dan for nearly twenty years, and have admired Allister’s work since childhood; it was an enormous pleasure to work with them, and we took the opportunity to snag interviews with them both, which you’ll also find in the book. Here’s Dan to offer you a taster.

Meet the artist behind Code the Classics

Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://rpf.io/ytsub Help us reach a wider audience by translating our video content: http://rpf.io/yttranslate Buy a Raspberry Pi from one of our Approved Resellers: http://rpf.io/ytproducts Find out more about the #RaspberryPi Foundation: Raspberry Pi http://rpf.io/ytrpi Code Club UK http://rpf.io/ytccuk Code Club International http://rpf.io/ytcci CoderDojo http://rpf.io/ytcd Check out our free online training courses: http://rpf.io/ytfl Find your local Raspberry Jam event: http://rpf.io/ytjam Work through our free online projects: http://rpf.io/ytprojects Do you have a question about your Raspberry Pi?

We’ve pushed the boat out on the production values for the book itself too: think of it as an object from a parallel universe where Usborne made luxury hardbound coffee-table type-in listing books rather than paperbacks.

So although, like all our books, you can download this one for free, you’ll really want a physical copy of Code the Classics to have, and to hold, and to leave on your bedside table to club intruders with.

And while the listings are rather long, and fully-commented versions are available on GitHub, perhaps you should think about spending a rainy afternoon actually typing one in.

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Learn to write games for the BBC Micro with Eben

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Long-time fans of the Raspberry Pi will know that we were inspired to make a programmable computer for kids by our own experiences with a machine called the BBC Micro, which many of us learned with in the 1980s.

This post is the first of what’s going to be an irregular series where I’ll walk you through building the sort of game we used to play when we were kids. You’ll need a copy of BeebEm (scroll down for a Linux port if you’re using a Pi – but this tutorial can be carried out on a PC or Mac as well as on an original BBC Micro if you have access to one).

I’m going to be presenting the next game in this series, tentatively titled Eben Goes Skiing, at the Centre for Computing History in Cambridge at 2pm this afternoon – head on down if you’d like to learn how to make scrolling ascii moguls.

Helicopter tutorial

We’re going to build a simple helicopter game in BBC BASIC. This will demonstrate a number of neat features, including user-defined characters, non-blocking keyboard input using INKEY, and positioning text and graphics using PRINT TAB.

Let’s start with user-defined characters. These provide us with an easy way to create a monochrome 8×8-pixel image by typing in 8 small numbers. As an example, let’s look at our helicopter sprite:

Each column pixel position in a row is “worth” a different power of 2, from 1 for the rightmost pixel up to 128 for the leftmost. To generate our 8 numbers, we process one row at a time, adding up the value for each occupied pixel position. We can now create custom character number 226 using the VDU 23 command. To display the character, we change to a graphics mode using the MODE command and display it using the PRINT command.

Type the following:

10MODE 2

70VDU 23,226,0,248,32,116,126,116,112,0

RUN

PRINT CHR$(226)

You should see the little helicopter on the screen just above your prompt. Let’s define some more characters for our game, with character numbers 224 through 229. These represent leftward and rightward flying birds, a rightward flying helicopter, the surface of the sea, and a landing pad.

Type the following:

50VDU 23,224,0,14,12,104,16,28,8,0

60VDU 23,225,0,112,48,22,8,56,16,0

80VDU 23,227,0,31,4,46,126,46,14,0

90VDU 23,228,0,102,255,255,255,255,255,255

100VDU 23,229,255,255,0,0,0,0,0,0

Trying running your program and using print to view the new characters!

Now we’re ready to use our sea and platform characters to build the game world. Mode 2 on the BBC Micro has 20 character positions across, and 32 down. We’ll draw 20 copies of the sea character in row 30 (remember, rows and columns are numbered from zero) using a FOR loop and the PRINT TAB command, and pick a random position for the platform using the RND() function.

Type the following:

110FOR I%=0 TO 19

120PRINT TAB(I%,30) CHR$(228);

130NEXT

140P%=RND(20)-1

150PRINT TAB(P%,30) CHR$(229);

RUN

You should see something like this:

Don’t worry about that cursor and prompt: they won’t show up in the finished game.

It’s time to add the helicopter. We’ll create variables X% and Y% to hold the position of the helicopter, and Z% to tell us if it last moved left or right. We’ll initialise X% to a random position, Y% to the top of the screen, and Z% to zero, meaning “left”. We can use PRINT TAB again to draw the helicopter (either character 226 or 227 depending on Z%) at its current position. The whole thing is wrapped up in a REPEAT loop, which keeps executing until the helicopter reaches the ground (in row 29).

Type the following:

160X%=RND(20)-1:Y%=0:Z%=0

180REPEAT

260PRINT TAB(X%,Y%) CHR$(226+Z%);

290UNTIL Y%=29

RUN

You’ll see the helicopter sitting at the top of the screen.

We’re almost there: let’s give our helicopter the ability to move left, right and down. On each trip round the loop, we move down one row, and use the INKEY() function to read the Z and X keys on the keyboard. If Z is pressed, and we’re not already at the left of the
screen, we move one column left. If X is pressed, and we’re not already at the right of the screen, we move one column right.

Type the following:

210IF INKEY(-98) AND X%>0 THEN X%=X%-1:Z%=0

220IF INKEY(-67) AND X%<19 THEN X%=X%+1:Z%=1

230Y%=Y%+1

RUN

You should see something like this:

The game is much, much too fast to control, and the helicopter leaves trails: not surprising, as we didn’t do anything to erase the previous frame. Let’s use PRINT TAB to place a “space” character over the previous position of the helicopter, and add an empty FOR loop to slow things down a bit.

Type the following:

190PRINT TAB (%,Y%)"";

280FOR I%=1 TO 200:NEXT

RUN

Much better! This is starting to feel like a real game. Let’s finish it off by:

  • Adding a bird that flies back and forth
  • Detecting whether you hit the pad or not
  • Getting rid of the annoying cursor using a “magic” VDU 23 command
  • Putting an outer loop in to let you play again

Type the following:

20REPEAT

30CLS

40VDU 23,1,0;0;0;0;

170A%=RND(18):B%=10:C%=RND(2)-1

200PRINT TAB(A%,B%) "";

240A%=A%+2*C%-1

250IF A%=0 OR A%=19 THEN C%=1-C%

270PRINT TAB(A%,B%) CHR$(224+C%);

300IF X%=P% PRINT TAB(6,15) "YOU WIN" ELSE PRINT TAB(6,15) "YOU
LOSE"

310PRINT TAB(4,16) "PRESS SPACE"

320REPEAT UNTIL INKEY(-99)

330UNTIL FALSE

RUN

And here it is in all its glory.

You might want to try adding some features to the game: collision with the bird, things to collect, vertical scrolling. The sky’s the limit!

I created a full version of the game, using graphics from our very own Sam Alder, for the Hackaday 1K challenge; you can find it here.

Appendix

Here’s the full source for the game in one block. If you get errors when you run your code, type:

MODE 0
LIST

And compare the output very carefully with what you see here.

10MODE 2
20REPEAT
30CLS
40VDU 23,1,0;0;0;0;
50VDU 23,224,0,14,12,104,16,28,8,0   
60VDU 23,225,0,112,48,22,8,56,16,0
70VDU 23,226,0,248,32,116,126,116,112,0
80VDU 23,227,0,31,4,46,126,46,14,0
90VDU 23,228,0,102,255,255,255,255,255,255
100VDU 23,229,255,255,0,0,0,0,0,0
110FOR I%=0 TO 19
120PRINT TAB(I%,30) CHR$(228);
130NEXT
140P%=RND(20)-1
150PRINT TAB(P%,30) CHR$(229);
160X%=RND(20)-1:Y%=0:Z%=0
170A%=RND(18):B%=10:C%=RND(2)-1
180REPEAT
190PRINT TAB(X%,Y%) " ";
200PRINT TAB(A%,B%) " ";  
210IF INKEY(-98) AND X%>0 THEN X%=X%-1:Z%=0  
220IF INKEY(-67) AND X%<19 THEN X%=X%+1:Z%=1
230Y%=Y%+1
240A%=A%+2*C%-1
250IF A%=0 OR A%=19 THEN C%=1-C%
260PRINT TAB(X%,Y%) CHR$(226+Z%);
270PRINT TAB(A%,B%) CHR$(224+C%);
280FOR I%=1 TO 200:NEXT
290UNTIL Y%=29
300IF X%=P% PRINT TAB(6,15) "YOU WIN" ELSE PRINT TAB(6,15) "YOU LOSE"
310PRINT TAB(4,16) "PRESS SPACE"
320REPEAT UNTIL INKEY(-99)
330UNTIL FALSE


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Coolest Projects International 2018

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Like many engineers, I have folder upon folder of half-completed projects on my computer. But the funny thing is that this wasn’t a problem for me as a child. Every other Friday evening, I’d spend two hours at Ilkley Computer Club, where I could show off whatever I’d been working on: nothing motivates you to actually finish a project like the opportunity to share it with an audience.

Raspberry Jams, Code Clubs, and CoderDojos all provide children (of all ages: we’re looking at you, Peter Onion) with a place where they can learn, share ideas, and make cool stuff with code and computers. But you can get so involved with the things you’re working on that you forget to take a step back every once in a while to look at what you’ve accomplished. And what do you do when you’ve shown your project to everyone you know, and you fancy a shot at a slightly larger audience?

Enter Coolest Projects International, now in its seventh year. Here’s a video that captures about 1% of the awesomeness of being there in person.

Celebrating Coolest Projects International 2018

Coolest Projects is a world-leading showcase that empowers and inspires the next generation of digital creators, innovators, changemakers, and entrepreneurs. This year, for the first time, we brought Coolest Projects to the UK for a spectacular regional event in London!

Coolest Projects brings Ninjas from CoderDojos across the globe together in Dublin for a chance to share their work with the world, and to compete to be coolest in one of several categories:

  • Scratch projects
  • Websites
  • Games
  • Mobile apps
  • Hardware
  • Evolution (basically, next-level stuff)

At this year’s event, more than 1000 children presented projects, from 15 countries including Argentina, Bulgaria, Italy, Japan, Romania, and Spain.

Raspberry Pi on Twitter

This is it! #CoolestProjects https://t.co/eoepjNWLsC

And for the first time, Coolest Projects was open to Raspberry Jam and Code Club members, and to the broader Raspberry Pi community.

Liz, our daughter Aphra, and I spent the day at the event, along with the CoderDojo team, what felt like half the Raspberry Pi Foundation, keynote speaker Pete Lomas, and the most amazing army of volunteers. Between chugging slushies, I had the opportunity to judge hardware projects with Noel King, CoderDojo volunteer and co-founder of Coolest Projects. Noel provided the judges with a pep talk at the start of the day. He reminded us that the aim wasn’t necessarily to find the most complete, or polished, or technically audacious project, but to seek out creativity: the project that does something unique, or does something you’ve seen before but in a unique way.

To my mind, the focus on creativity is what sets Coolest Projects apart. This is, after all, a contest that aims to “empower and inspire the next generation of digital creators, innovators, changemakers, and entrepreneurs”, and that recognises that each of those activities is, at heart, a creative pursuit.

Unsurprisingly, given the strength of the field, judging went on for some time. Each category’s winner and runner-up were exceptional, and there were countless other projects that didn’t quite make the cut but that I’d be proud to have made myself. Where were these folks when I was a teenager?

You can see the winners and runners up in each category on the Coolest Projects Twitter feed, and you should also check out the winners of the six special prizes. One that especially struck me was Selin Alara Ornek’s project, iC4U, a robot guide dog that she developed at her local CoderDojo in Turkey.

While Coolest Projects started in Dublin, it’s now an international phenomenon. In the last couple of months we’ve seen Coolest Projects regional events in Belgium, Romania, and the UK.

Showcasing your projects at Coolest Projects UK 2018

Coolest Projects is a world-leading showcase that empowers and inspires the next generation of digital creators, innovators, changemakers, and entrepreneurs. This year, for the first time, we brought Coolest Projects to the UK for a spectacular regional event in London!

In September we’ll be holding the inaugural Coolest Projects North America at the Discovery Cube in Orange County.

Coolest Projects began as a volunteer-run event, and we’re immensely privileged to have this wonderful showcase for our community. We are enormously grateful to all the staff and volunteers who continue to give huge amounts of their time, effort, and talent every year to make it the wonderful event that it is. Thank you, all of you.

Events like these give me hope that the future of our industry will be every bit as exciting, and vastly more diverse, than our past and present. If you have a chance to participate in one of them, I think you’ll come away feeling the same.

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Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ on sale now at $35

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Here’s a long post. We think you’ll find it interesting. If you don’t have time to read it all, we recommend you watch this video, which will fill you in with everything you need, and then head straight to the product page to fill yer boots. (We recommend the video anyway, even if you do have time for a long read. ‘Cos it’s fab.)

A BRAND-NEW PI FOR π DAY

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is now on sale now for $35, featuring: – A 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU – Dual-band 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2 – Faster Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet over USB 2.0) – Power-over-Ethernet support (with separate PoE HAT) – Improved PXE network and USB mass-storage booting – Improved thermal management Alongside a 200MHz increase in peak CPU clock frequency, we have roughly three times the wired and wireless network throughput, and the ability to sustain high performance for much longer periods.

If you’ve been a Raspberry Pi watcher for a while now, you’ll have a bit of a feel for how we update our products. Just over two years ago, we released Raspberry Pi 3 Model B. This was our first 64-bit product, and our first product to feature integrated wireless connectivity. Since then, we’ve sold over nine million Raspberry Pi 3 units (we’ve sold 19 million Raspberry Pis in total), which have been put to work in schools, homes, offices and factories all over the globe.

Those Raspberry Pi watchers will know that we have a history of releasing improved versions of our products a couple of years into their lives. The first example was Raspberry Pi 1 Model B+, which added two additional USB ports, introduced our current form factor, and rolled up a variety of other feedback from the community. Raspberry Pi 2 didn’t get this treatment, of course, as it was superseded after only one year; but it feels like it’s high time that Raspberry Pi 3 received the “plus” treatment.

So, without further ado, Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is now on sale for $35 (the same price as the existing Raspberry Pi 3 Model B), featuring:

  • A 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU
  • Dual-band 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2
  • Faster Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet over USB 2.0)
  • Power-over-Ethernet support (with separate PoE HAT)
  • Improved PXE network and USB mass-storage booting
  • Improved thermal management

Alongside a 200MHz increase in peak CPU clock frequency, we have roughly three times the wired and wireless network throughput, and the ability to sustain high performance for much longer periods.

Behold the shiny

Raspberry Pi 3B+ is available to buy today from our network of Approved Resellers.

New features, new chips

Roger Thornton did the design work on this revision of the Raspberry Pi. Here, he and I have a chat about what’s new.

Introducing the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is now on sale now for $35, featuring: – A 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU – Dual-band 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2 – Faster Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet over USB 2.0) – Power-over-Ethernet support (with separate PoE HAT) – Improved PXE network and USB mass-storage booting – Improved thermal management Alongside a 200MHz increase in peak CPU clock frequency, we have roughly three times the wired and wireless network throughput, and the ability to sustain high performance for much longer periods.

The new product is built around BCM2837B0, an updated version of the 64-bit Broadcom application processor used in Raspberry Pi 3B, which incorporates power integrity optimisations, and a heat spreader (that’s the shiny metal bit you can see in the photos). Together these allow us to reach higher clock frequencies (or to run at lower voltages to reduce power consumption), and to more accurately monitor and control the temperature of the chip.

Dual-band wireless LAN and Bluetooth are provided by the Cypress CYW43455 “combo” chip, connected to a Proant PCB antenna similar to the one used on Raspberry Pi Zero W. Compared to its predecessor, Raspberry Pi 3B+ delivers somewhat better performance in the 2.4GHz band, and far better performance in the 5GHz band, as demonstrated by these iperf results from LibreELEC developer Milhouse.

Tx bandwidth (Mb/s) Rx bandwidth (Mb/s)
Raspberry Pi 3B 35.7 35.6
Raspberry Pi 3B+ (2.4GHz) 46.7 46.3
Raspberry Pi 3B+ (5GHz) 102 102

The wireless circuitry is encapsulated under a metal shield, rather fetchingly embossed with our logo. This has allowed us to certify the entire board as a radio module under FCC rules, which in turn will significantly reduce the cost of conformance testing Raspberry Pi-based products.

We’ll be teaching metalwork next.

Previous Raspberry Pi devices have used the LAN951x family of chips, which combine a USB hub and 10/100 Ethernet controller. For Raspberry Pi 3B+, Microchip have supported us with an upgraded version, LAN7515, which supports Gigabit Ethernet. While the USB 2.0 connection to the application processor limits the available bandwidth, we still see roughly a threefold increase in throughput compared to Raspberry Pi 3B. Again, here are some typical iperf results.

Tx bandwidth (Mb/s) Rx bandwidth (Mb/s)
Raspberry Pi 3B 94.1 95.5
Raspberry Pi 3B+ 315 315

We use a magjack that supports Power over Ethernet (PoE), and bring the relevant signals to a new 4-pin header. We will shortly launch a PoE HAT which can generate the 5V necessary to power the Raspberry Pi from the 48V PoE supply.

There… are… four… pins!

Coming soon to a Raspberry Pi 3B+ near you

Raspberry Pi 3B was our first product to support PXE Ethernet boot. Testing it in the wild shook out a number of compatibility issues with particular switches and traffic environments. Gordon has rolled up fixes for all known issues into the BCM2837B0 boot ROM, and PXE boot is now enabled by default.

Clocking, voltages and thermals

The improved power integrity of the BCM2837B0 package, and the improved regulation accuracy of our new MaxLinear MxL7704 power management IC, have allowed us to tune our clocking and voltage rules for both better peak performance and longer-duration sustained performance.

Below 70°C, we use the improvements to increase the core frequency to 1.4GHz. Above 70°C, we drop to 1.2GHz, and use the improvements to decrease the core voltage, increasing the period of time before we reach our 80°C thermal throttle; the reduction in power consumption is such that many use cases will never reach the throttle. Like a modern smartphone, we treat the thermal mass of the device as a resource, to be spent carefully with the goal of optimising user experience.

This graph, courtesy of Gareth Halfacree, demonstrates that Raspberry Pi 3B+ runs faster and at a lower temperature for the duration of an eight‑minute quad‑core Sysbench CPU test.

Note that Raspberry Pi 3B+ does consume substantially more power than its predecessor. We strongly encourage you to use a high-quality 2.5A power supply, such as the official Raspberry Pi Universal Power Supply.

FAQs

We’ll keep updating this list over the next couple of days, but here are a few to get you started.

Are you discontinuing earlier Raspberry Pi models?

No. We have a lot of industrial customers who will want to stick with the existing products for the time being. We’ll keep building these models for as long as there’s demand. Raspberry Pi 1B+, Raspberry Pi 2B, and Raspberry Pi 3B will continue to sell for $25, $35, and $35 respectively.

What about Model A+?

Raspberry Pi 1A+ continues to be the $20 entry-level “big” Raspberry Pi for the time being. We are considering the possibility of producing a Raspberry Pi 3A+ in due course.

What about the Compute Module?

CM1, CM3 and CM3L will continue to be available. We may offer versions of CM3 and CM3L with BCM2837B0 in due course, depending on customer demand.

Are you still using VideoCore?

Yes. VideoCore IV 3D is the only publicly-documented 3D graphics core for ARM‑based SoCs, and we want to make Raspberry Pi more open over time, not less.

Credits

A project like this requires a vast amount of focused work from a large team over an extended period. Particular credit is due to Roger Thornton, who designed the board and ran the exhaustive (and exhausting) RF compliance campaign, and to the team at the Sony UK Technology Centre in Pencoed, South Wales. A partial list of others who made major direct contributions to the BCM2837B0 chip program, CYW43455 integration, LAN7515 and MxL7704 developments, and Raspberry Pi 3B+ itself follows:

James Adams, David Armour, Jonathan Bell, Maria Blazquez, Jamie Brogan-Shaw, Mike Buffham, Rob Campling, Cindy Cao, Victor Carmon, KK Chan, Nick Chase, Nigel Cheetham, Scott Clark, Nigel Clift, Dominic Cobley, Peter Coyle, John Cronk, Di Dai, Kurt Dennis, David Doyle, Andrew Edwards, Phil Elwell, John Ferdinand, Doug Freegard, Ian Furlong, Shawn Guo, Philip Harrison, Jason Hicks, Stefan Ho, Andrew Hoare, Gordon Hollingworth, Tuomas Hollman, EikPei Hu, James Hughes, Andy Hulbert, Anand Jain, David John, Prasanna Kerekoppa, Shaik Labeeb, Trevor Latham, Steve Le, David Lee, David Lewsey, Sherman Li, Xizhe Li, Simon Long, Fu Luo Larson, Juan Martinez, Sandhya Menon, Ben Mercer, James Mills, Max Passell, Mark Perry, Eric Phiri, Ashwin Rao, Justin Rees, James Reilly, Matt Rowley, Akshaye Sama, Ian Saturley, Serge Schneider, Manuel Sedlmair, Shawn Shadburn, Veeresh Shivashimper, Graham Smith, Ben Stephens, Mike Stimson, Yuree Tchong, Stuart Thomson, John Wadsworth, Ian Watch, Sarah Williams, Jason Zhu.

If you’re not on this list and think you should be, please let me know, and accept my apologies.

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