Category Archives: Aggregated

STM32F103 vs GD32F103

via Dangerous Prototypes

stm32vsgd32

Sjaak wrote about a Chinese ARM chip compared to a ST ARM chip:

Most of us do know the ST line of ARM chips called STM32. They come in multiple flavours and the STM32F103 is one of the most common entry level family of chips. They are called by ST as mainstream. They are a full featured 32 bit ARM Cortex M3 chip running at max. 72MHz with all the requisite peripherals like ADC, DAC, USB, CAN, I2C, I2S, SPI, SDIO, PWM, RTC, interrupts and various timers. Lets zoom into the STM32F103C8 chip (which seems the be the go-to choice of the Chinese el-cheapo development breakout boards)

See the full post at smdprutser.nl.

Free PCB coupon via Facebook to 2 random commenters

via Dangerous Prototypes

BP

Every Friday we give away some extra PCBs via Facebook. This post was announced on Facebook, and on Monday we’ll send coupon codes to two random commenters. The coupon code usually go to Facebook ‘Other’ Messages Folder . More PCBs via Twitter on Tuesday and the blog every Sunday. Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times every week:

Some stuff:

  • Yes, we’ll mail it anywhere in the world!
  • We’ll contact you via Facebook with a coupon code for the PCB drawer.
  • Limit one PCB per address per month, please.
  • Like everything else on this site, PCBs are offered without warranty.

We try to stagger free PCB posts so every time zone has a chance to participate, but the best way to see it first is to subscribe to the RSS feed, follow us on Twitter, or like us on Facebook.

e-paper pocket money tracker using Monzo pots

via Raspberry Pi

Jason Barnett used the pots feature of the Monzo banking API to create a simple e-paper display so that his kids can keep track of their pocket money.

Monzo ePaper Pot Jason Barnett Raspberry Pi

Monzo

For those outside the UK: Monzo is a smartphone-based bank that allows costumers to manage their money and payment cards via an app, removing the bank clerk middleman.

In the Monzo banking app, users can set up pots, which allow them to organise their money into various, you guessed it, pots. You want to put aside holiday funds, budget your food shopping, or, like Jason, manage your kids’ pocket money? Using pots is an easy way to do it.

Jason’s Monzo Pot ePaper tracker

After failed attempts at keeping track of his sons’ pocket money via a scrap of paper stuck to the fridge, Jason decided to try a new approach.

He started his build by installing Stretch Lite to the SD card of his Raspberry Pi Zero W. “The Pi will be running headless (without screen, mouse or keyboard)”, he explains on his blog, “so there is no need for a full-fat Raspbian image.” While Stretch Lite was downloading, he set up the Waveshare ePaper HAT on his Zero W. He notes that Pimoroni’s “Inky pHAT would be easiest,” but his tutorial is specific to the Waveshare device.

Monzo ePaper Pot Jason Barnett Raspberry Pi

Before ejecting the SD card, Jason updated the boot partition to allow him to access the Pi via SSH. He talks makers through that process here.

Among the libraries he installed for the project is pyMonzo, a Python wrapper for the Monzo API created by Paweł Adamczak. Monzo is still in its infancy, and the API is partly under construction. Until it’s completed, Paweł’s wrapper offers a more stable way to use it.

After installing the software, it was time to set up the e-paper screen for the tracker. Jason adjusted the code for the API so that the screen reloads information every 15 minutes, displaying the up-to-date amount of pocket money in both kids’ pots.

Here is how Jason describes going to the supermarket with his sons, now that he has completed the tracker:

“Daddy, I want (insert first thing picked up here), I’ve always wanted one of these my whole life!” […] Even though you have never seen that (insert thing here) before, I can quickly open my Monzo app, flick to Account, and say “You have £3.50 in your money box”. If my boy wants it, a 2-second withdrawal is made whilst queueing, and done — he walks away with a new (again, insert whatever he wanted his whole life here) and is happy!

Jason’s blog offers a full breakdown of his project, including all necessary code and the specs for the physical build. Be sure to head over and check it out.

Have you used an API in your projects? What would you build with one?

The post e-paper pocket money tracker using Monzo pots appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Friday Product Post: Jack be Nimble, Jack be Qwiic

via SparkFun: Commerce Blog

Hello everyone, and welcome back to another fantastic Friday Product Post here at SparkFun! We are getting back into the swing of things after last week’s huge Crystal Anniversary Sale with four new products to get your brilliant minds ticking. This Friday we start off with two new Qwiic boards — one that incorporates a handy, blue-on-black OLED screen and one that’s a smart human presence sensor. Closing out the week we have an updated version of the SIK for micro:bit and another handy micro:bit Lab Pack for all of our educator friends. Without further ado let’s jump in and take a closer look at all of this week’s new products!

Jack jump over the candlestick!

SparkFun Micro OLED Breakout (Qwiic)

LCD-14532
$14.95

The SparkFun Qwiic Micro OLED Breakout is a Qwiic-enabled version of our popular Micro OLED display! The small monochrome, blue-on-black OLED screen presents incredibly clear images for your viewing pleasure. It’s “micro,” but it still packs a punch — the OLED display is crisp, and you can fit a deceivingly large amount of graphics on there. This breakout is perfect for adding graphics to your next project and displaying diagnostic information without resorting to a serial output, all with the ease of use of our own Qwiic Connect System!

This version of the Micro OLED Breakout is exactly the size of its non-Qwiic sibling, featuring a screen that is 64 pixels wide and 48 pixels tall and measuring 0.66" across.


SparkFun Human Presence Sensor Breakout - AK9753 (Qwiic)

SEN-14349
$24.95

This is not your normal PIR! The SparkFun AK9753 Human Presence Sensor Breakout is a Qwiic-enabled, 4-channel Nondispersive Infrared (NDIR) sensor. Each channel has a different field of view, so not only can the AK9753 detect a human, but it can also tell which direction the person is moving. To make it even easier to use this breakout, all communication is enacted exclusively via I2C, utilizing our handy Qwiic system. However, we still have broken out 0.1" spaced pins in case you prefer to use a breadboard.


SparkFun Inventor's Kit for micro:bit

KIT-14542
$49.95

The SparkFun Inventor’s Kit (SIK) for micro:bit is a great way to get creative, connected and coding with the micro:bit. The SIK for micro:bit provides not only the micro:bit board but everything you need to hook up and experiment with multiple electronic circuits! With the SIK for micro:bit you will be able to complete circuits that will teach you how to read sensors, move motors, build Bluetooth® devices and more.


SparkFun Inventor's Kit for micro:bit Lab Pack

LAB-14301
$450.00

The SparkFun Inventor’s Kit for micro:bit Lab Pack includes 10 complete micro:bit Inventor’s Kits, an SIK Refill Pack and 25 AA-sized batteries to get your students started in the world of electronics. The SIKs inside the Lab Pack have everything you need, including micro:bits, connector breakouts, breadboards and all the cables and accessories to hook up all the projects listed in our online Experiment Guide.


And that’s it for this week, everyone! We hope you get a lot of great use out of all the new products this week. As always, we can’t wait to see what you make with these products! Shoot us a tweet @sparkfun, or let us know on Instagram or Facebook. We’d love to see what projects you’ve made!

Thanks for stopping by. We’ll see you next week with even more fantastic new products!

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TWANG, an Arduino-based dungeon crawler

via Dangerous Prototypes

20180111_130909-1-600

Bdring built his own Arduino-based 1D dungeon crawler inspired by Robin Baumgarten’s  Line Wobbler:

I have been a Patron of Robin Baumgarten for a while. He makes experimental hardware for games. His Line Wobbler one dimensional dungeon crawler is my favorite and I have always wanted to play it. It uses a door stop spring as the controller. An accelerometer in the knob allows it to work like a joystick and also detect the wobble used to attack the enemies.

More details at Buildlog.net blog.

Yield function, printable class and mapping arrays: Useful but unknown features from Arduino core

via Dangerous Prototypes

test-printable-arduino-1

Yahya Tawil over at Atadiat wrote a new tip for Arduino developers about three hidden and useful features in Arduino core:

Arduino core, the source code of Arduino API functions and classes, has three useful features that can be used effectively. As the Arduino core documentation doesn’t mention them (at least until the time of publishing this micro-blog), these features are not well-known for arduino developers. Let’s discuss each feature of them one by one.

More details at Atadiat blog.

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