Category Archives: Aggregated

Prevent forest fires with the Birdhouse Alarm

via Arduino Blog

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The northern part of Spain, which is full of villages, vegetation and wildlife, is prone to wildfires. In fact, nearly 40% of the land was burnt back in 2015. Unfortunately, whenever a fire breaks out in a remote area, it often goes unnoticed or reached before damage occurs. With these instances becoming more common, insurance company Generali decided to find a better solution for early detection.

Their answer to the problem? Birdhouse Alarms. Each wooden (recycled, of course) birdhouse features an Arduino, a solar panel, a rechargeable battery, a smoke sensor and a 3G network connection, enabling it to send a geolocated signal to local authorities in the event of a fire.

The prototypes, which were designed by Ogilvy & Mather, are currently being tested.

Submit or import your project on Project Hub

via Arduino Blog

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The Arduino Project Hub (powered by Hackster.io) is a community dedicated to discovering how fun and rewarding tinkering with electronics and software can be, so any project made with Arduino and Genuino boards is welcome! Each day, the Arduino Team will select some of the best tutorials and highlight them on our social channels.

The Arduino Project Hub is also a great place to keep your latest projects and easily share them with your friends, students and the rest of the community!

If you have tutorials and articles on other platforms, we’ve got some good news! There is a cool import function so you can just paste the link and we’ll take care of the transfer. When you click on ‘New Project’ you will be presented with two options, create a tutorial from scratch or import one via URL.

importProjectHub

Read this tutorial to learn more.

Apply now for Picademy in Baltimore

via Raspberry Pi

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Making computing accessible is a major part of the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s mission. Our low-cost, high-performance computer is just one way that we achieve that. With our Picademy program, we also train teachers so that more young people can learn about computers and how to make things with them.

Throughout 2016, we’re running a United States pilot of Picademy. Raspberry Pi Foundation’s commitment is to train 100 teachers on US soil this year and we’ve made another leap towards meeting that commitment last weekend with our second cohort, but more on that below.

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In order to make Picademy more accessible for US educators, we’re happy to announce our third Picademy USA workshop, which will take place August 13 and 14 at the Digital Harbor Foundation in Baltimore, Maryland. Applications are open now and will close in early July. Please help us spread the word. We want to hear from all of the most enthusiastic and creative educators from all disciplines—not just computing. Picademy cohorts are made up of an incredible mixture of different types of educators from different subject areas. Not only will these educators learn about digital making from the Raspberry Pi education team, but they’ll be meeting and collaborating with a group of incredibly passionate peers.

To give you an idea of the passion and enthusiasm, I want to introduce you to our second US cohort of Raspberry Pi Certified Educators. Last weekend at the Computer History Museum, they gathered from all over North America to learn the ropes of digital making with Raspberry Pi and collaborate on projects together. They knocked it out of the park.

Our superhero Raspberry Pi Certified Educators! © Douglas Fairbairn Photography / Courtesy of the Computer History Museum

Our superhero Raspberry Pi Certified Educators! © Douglas Fairbairn Photography / Courtesy of the Computer History Museum

Peek into the #Picademy hashtag and you’ll get a small taste of what it’s like to be a part of this program:

Abby Almerido on Twitter

Sign of transformative learning = Unquenchable thirst for more #picademy Thank you @LegoJames @MattRichardson @ben_nuttall @olsonk408

Keith Baisley on Twitter

Such a fun/engaging weekend of learning,can’t thank you all enough @LegoJames @MattRichardson @ben_nuttall @EbenUpton and others #picademy

Peter Strawn on Twitter

Home from #Picademy. What an incredible weekend. Thank you, @Raspberry_Pi. Now to reflect and put my experience into action!

Dan Blickensderfer on Twitter

Pinned. What a great community. Thanks! #picademypic.twitter.com/TLLzjff0wF

Making Picademy a success takes a lot of work from many people. Thank you to: Lauren Silver, Kate McGregor, Stephanie Corrigan, and everyone at the Computer History Museum. Kevin Olson, a Raspberry Pi Certified Educator who stepped in to help facilitate the workshops. Kevin Malachowski, Ruchi Lohani, Sam Patterson, Jesse Lozano, and Eben Upton who mentored the educators. Sonia Uppal, Abhinav Mathur, and Keshav Saharia for presenting their amazing work with Raspberry Pi.

If you want to join our tribe and you can be in Baltimore on August 13th and 14th, please apply to be a part of our next Picademy in the United States! For updates on future Picademy workshops in the US, please click here to sign up for notifications.

The post Apply now for Picademy in Baltimore appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

#FreePCB via Twitter to 2 random RTs

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Every Tuesday we give away two coupons for the free PCB drawer via Twitter. This post was announced on Twitter, and in 24 hours we’ll send coupon codes to two random retweeters. Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times a every week:

  • Hate Twitter and Facebook? Free PCB Sunday is the classic PCB giveaway. Catch it every Sunday, right here on the blog
  • Tweet-a-PCB Tuesday. Follow us and get boards in 144 characters or less
  • Facebook PCB Friday. Free PCBs will be your friend for the weekend

Some stuff:

  • Yes, we’ll mail it anywhere in the world!
  • Check out how we mail PCBs worldwide video.
  • We’ll contact you via Twitter with a coupon code for the PCB drawer.
  • Limit one PCB per address per month please.
  • Like everything else on this site, PCBs are offered without warranty.

We try to stagger free PCB posts so every time zone has a chance to participate, but the best way to see it first is to subscribe to the RSS feed, follow us on Twitter, or like us on Facebook.

3V3/30V DC/DC converter using SN6505A

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Robert Gawron made a 3V3/30V DC/DC converter using SN6505A:

Recently I’v got my samples of SN6505A, it’s a really nice IC, so I decided to make a simple DC/DC converter to get familiar with it. What I like in this chip is that it can operate on input voltage as low as 2,5V – that makes it great for battery devices. It’s also nice, that it’s a very minimalist design – on primary side all what is needed is decoupling capacitor. One disadvantage is that it doesn’t have a feedback loop.
To increase efficiency, SN6505A can operate with more developed versions of transformers, but I used the simplest configuration – one coil on each side.

Project info at Robert Gawron’s blog.