Category Archives: Aggregated

Hardware Hump Day: ITP 2017 Spring Show Recap

via SparkFun Electronics Blog Posts

I was very fortunate to spend the past week in New York City. In addition to participating in Creative Tech Week, I also had the pleasure of visiting the ITP 2017 Spring Show.

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ITP, or the Interactive Telecommunications Program, is a two-year graduate program located in the Tisch School of the Arts at NYU. It also happens to be my alma mater! ITP's mission is to explore the imaginative use of technologies — how they might augment, improve, and bring delight and art into people’s lives. Students leverage engineering and technology for creative pursuits.

At the end of each semester, ITP hosts a big showcase for the students to share their best work from the past four months with the public. It’s a major event with every inch of space covered in brilliant interactive projects and an overwhelming number of visitors coming to see the latest and greatest. I was absolutely blown away at the ingenuity, creativity and technical brilliance evident in so many of the projects that I saw this year, and I’m extremely excited to share some of them with you today!

K.W.E.E.N. by Jordan Frand

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K.W.E.E.N. is a line of wearable technology accessories for drag queens and other performers of femininity. The pieces that comprise K.W.E.E.N. confer upon the wearer performative superpowers, giving her unparalleled control over her appearance and the very spaces she commands. Like magic, lighting and staging elements change at the whim of the performer, thanks to her conductive nails. A LightBlue Bean hidden in a bracelet on each hand communicates wirelessly with Max/MSP, giving the wearer control over characteristics of the DMX universe: on/off, strobe, color, brightness, fog machine, laser, etc. Each finger trigger can be programmed to alter various aspects of lighting and staging, giving the performer the power to sculpt in real time the spaces graced by her presence.

To learn more about K.W.E.E.N., check out this video of Jordan presenting his work, this video documenting the project, and the K.W.E.E.N. project page.

A Ritual That Lasts Forever by Fengyi Franklin Zhu

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This project is an attempt to use technology to reinterpret the traditional dragon dance practice in the form of a kinetic sculpture. “A Ritual That Lasts Forever” is a metaphor in the form of a kinetic dragon sculpture, with allegorical power to tell the story of humanity’s relationship with traditional religious worship and technology, a story of the now and a prediction of the future. The piece features 11 robotic arms that control 10 segments of a long, acrylic dragon suspended below them, as well as a ball that the dragon is chasing. With a customized algorithm, the team of 11 robotic arms moves the dragon form suspended below to perform the dragon dance endlessly. In this way, the dragon is back again, aided by the very thing that has been taking the dragon away.

To learn more about “A Ritual That Lasts Forever,” check out this video of Franklin presenting his work, this video documenting the project, and the “A Ritual That Lasts Forever” project page.

Museum of Funny Ladies — A Museumette by Angela Perrone

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The “Museum of Funny Ladies — A Museumette” is an interactive experience that brings to life a moment from the history of women in comedy, the 1970s, when pioneer lady comedy writers broke into an industry primarily dominated by men. This exhibit transports visitors back to the 1970s and places them in the seat of pioneer TV comedy writer Sybil Adelman, a trailblazer who helped change the landscape of writers' rooms forever. From a typewriter to scripts, a telephone to a television, visitors can interact with objects in the space that were part of a writer’s daily routine and experience what it was like to be the only woman in the room, through the eyes of Sybil.

This experience features three entry points and an interactive story arc that matches the writing process from start to airtime. The experience begins at the typewriter, the global interaction, where one magic touch of a key brings the scene to life with her narrative of how she became a writer. Visitors can call a variety of important names and contacts in her address book to hear anecdotes about her experiences with them. After learning about the key people and stories behind the scenes, the television offers visitors the chance to change channels to see her work and effort come to fruition.

To learn more about “Museum of Funny Ladies — A Museumette,” check out this video of Angela presenting her work, this video documenting the project, and the “Museum of Funny Ladies — A Museumette” project page.

Geode #1 (Fun House) by Jared Friedman

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Geode #1 is a space for solitary contemplation of the body and the self — in the form of an inside-out disco ball. This geodesic sphere is 7 feet in diameter, mounted on a short wooden platform, with a small door in the side. The viewer enters the structure and sits down on a cushion on the floor, the door shuts, and everything is completely dark. After a short time, there is a flash of light, and all surfaces inside are revealed as mirrors. There is no fixed point, except for the viewer’s own body. Soon the lighting begins to change, both of its own accord and in response to the viewer's position and movements. The experience is by turns exploratory and meditative. It is embedded with sensors with which the user can interact in the space. Lights turn on and off based on the user’s actions.

To learn more about Geode #1 (Fun House), check out this video of Jared presenting his work, and the Geode #1 (Fun House) project page.

Thank You Lights by Aaron Parsekian

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In this project, Aaron asks if something high-tech can be powered by trash. He successfully created a rechargeable battery using charcoal, steel and aluminum. This final version of the battery uses a standard USB charger for recharging. By charging three cells for 10 minutes with a USB charger, the battery will provide power to a 60 lumen LED for 10 hours. This final battery is made up of an aluminum electrode sandwiched between cardboard soaked in saltwater and charcoal and surrounded by a steel can. The battery cells are insulated from each other using fused plastic bags.

To learn more about Thank You Lights, check out this video of Aaron presenting his work, and the Thank You Lights project page.

Play:Connected by Jason Beck

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For children with disabilities in medical facilities, the internet offers a connection to the lives of parents, siblings and friends. Though their bodies might not be able to inhabit the same place, they can still play through the networks that connect people with a wider world.

Play:Connected features an internet-controlled rover streaming video and audio to a child in a remote medical facility. Built from various microcontrollers, motors and electronic components, the rover senses and responds to play with other children. In its current iteration, the rover engages other children via a foam-dart turret mounted on the device that can be activated by the child remotely. Others can retaliate via a sensor embedded in another foam-dart gun. When fired at the rover, the sensor activates a turret in the remote child’s room, discharging foam darts at him or her.

To learn more about Play:Connected, check out this video of Jason presenting his work, this video documenting the project, and the Play:Connected project page.


These six projects are just a taste of the incredible work that I witnessed last week. I wish I could share them all. To check out all of the 2017 ITP Thesis projects, visit the ITP Thesis 2017 page and browse around. You can also learn more about the projects that were featured in the ITP 2017 spring show on the Spring Show webpage!

Congratulations to the students at ITP on a spectacular set of work! I can’t wait to see what the next year will bring!

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The Pi Who Loved Me

via Raspberry Pi

Fancy yourself as James Bond? In honour of English treasure Roger Moore, we think it’s high time we all became a little more MI5 and a little less MIDoneYet?

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It’s been a while and M is worried you’re a little…rusty. Best head back to training: go see Q. He has everything you need to get back in shape, both physically and mentally, for the challenges ahead!

Training Camp

Q here, good to have you back.

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First thing’s first: we need to work on your skills and get you ready for your next assignment. Let’s start with your reaction times. This skill is critical in getting you prepared for stealthy situations and averting detection.

Head into my office and grab a Raspberry Pi, LED, and a button to build your own Python Quick Reaction Game. Not only will it help you brush up on your quick thinking, it’ll also teach you how to wire a circuit, use variables, and gather information. This could be key in getting you out of some sticky situations further down the line if you find yourself without one of my gadgets.

James Bond Q

Though speaking of…have you seen our See Like a Bat echolocation device? I’m rather proud of it, even if I do say so myself. Now, even in the darkest of times, you can find your way through any building or maze.

Gathering Intel

We’ll need you to gather some important information for us. But what can you do to make sure no one steals your secret intel? We need you to build a Secret Agent Chat Generator to encrypt information. Once you have completed it, send the information to M via this Morse Code Visual Radio.

Do do this, you’ll need a Morse Code Key. You can find them online or at your local war museum, though they may not care for your taking theirs. But we’re spies. And spies are experts in taking forbidden artefacts. After all, this is what your Laser Tripwire training was for. Oh, you haven’t completed it yet?

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Well, get to it. Time’s a-wasting!

Locks and Detection

You’re done? Good. Back to the intel.

Until you can find a Morse Code Key, why not hide the information in this Sense HAT Puzzle Box. It’s a wonderful tool to help you learn how to create loops and use conditional statements and functions to create ‘locks’.

You’ll also need to…wait…did you hear that? Someone is listening in, I’m sure of it. Check the Parent Detector to see who is trying to spy on us.

Surveillance

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Are they gone? Good. Phew, that was a close one. We can’t be so careless in the future. Let’s set up a Raspberry Pi Zero Time-Lapse Camera for constant surveillance of the training camp. You could also attach the camera to your glasses. No one will notice, and you’ll be able to record images of your missions – vital for debriefing.

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Right. That’s all from me. Report back to M for your mission. And remember, this blog post will self-destruct in five…wait, wrong franchise.

Good luck!

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Puns

Other Raspberry Pi/James Bond puns include:

  • Live and Let Pi
  • MoonBaker
  • GoldenPi – Starring Pi-s Brosnan
  • Pifall
  • You Only Live Pi-ce
  • Tomorrow Never Pis
  • Pi Another Day
  • Pi-monds Are Forever
  • For Your Pis Only

Any more?

The post The Pi Who Loved Me appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

#FreePCB via Twitter to 2 random RTs

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Every Tuesday we give away two coupons for the free PCB drawer via Twitter. This post was announced on Twitter, and in 24 hours we’ll send coupon codes to two random retweeters. Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times a every week:

  • Hate Twitter and Facebook? Free PCB Sunday is the classic PCB giveaway. Catch it every Sunday, right here on the blog
  • Tweet-a-PCB Tuesday. Follow us and get boards in 144 characters or less
  • Facebook PCB Friday. Free PCBs will be your friend for the weekend

Some stuff:

  • Yes, we’ll mail it anywhere in the world!
  • Check out how we mail PCBs worldwide video.
  • We’ll contact you via Twitter with a coupon code for the PCB drawer.
  • Limit one PCB per address per month please.
  • Like everything else on this site, PCBs are offered without warranty.

We try to stagger free PCB posts so every time zone has a chance to participate, but the best way to see it first is to subscribe to the RSS feed, follow us on Twitter, or like us on Facebook.

Open Hardware Summit 2017 Hotel Rooms and post-summit events

via Open Source Hardware Association

We are only a few months out from this years OHSummit! This year we will be hosting the annual gathering in the Rocky Mountain region in beautiful Denver, Colorado. Denver is home to several startups and projects built around the open source ethos with a thriving community to support the movement. If you are interested in finding out more about some of the local open source culture, be sure to check out the new events page here!

We are excited to announce that ART Hotel, adjacent to this year’s venue, is working with us to provide discounted rates for their rooms! Find out more information here.

Don’t forget there are still tickets and sponsorship places available as well!

Hope to see everyone in Denver!

IoTuesday: The Three IoT Projects that Everyone’s Done (Twice)

via SparkFun Electronics Blog Posts

When you spend as much time as we do looking at people’s awesome DIY IoT devices, you notice a few things. One is that IoT is a popular idea, and there are a lot of people who are ready to have this tech in their homes. The other is that basically everyone wants IoT to do one of three things: automate their appliances, check the weather or provide at-a-glance info.

This isn’t a condemnation of those ideas or the people who build their projects around them. I think these are just the services people expect from IoT right now, so that’s the problem they’re trying to solve. And they’re solving it well, in all kinds of ways!

Here’s an overview of the three most common IoT projects and why I think they’re great:

Remote Appliance Switch

The number of times in a brainstorming meeting that I’ve said, “Maybe we can turn a whatever on and off with it, like from a smart-phone,” is nearly uncountable. We already have tons of household appliances that are smarter than the computers that put Apollo 11 on the moon; let’s turn them on from the other room! This also happens to be the “Hello World” of IoT: You’re getting an input from the internet and controlling one bit with it. The ease with which you can make a platform do this is often a good measure of how nice that platform will be for IoT in general.

Here are a few projects in this category that I liked from hackster.io



And, of course, here’s where we did it!


Weather Monitoring Station


Whether your station is in service of citizen science or just in service of helping you get dressed appropriately in the morning, having your own automated weather observations is undeniably handy. Also, weather stations comprise a nice variety of sensors and therefore make a good test platform for streaming different kinds of measurements to the web and displaying them in a way that makes sense. Bonus points if your weather station posts to Weather Underground or some other weather station network!

Here are a few projects in this category that I liked from hackster.io



And here are our weather related IoT builds

Photon Remote Temperature Sensor

Learn how to build your own Internet-connect, solar-powered temperature collection station using the Photon from Particle.

Photon Weather Shield Hookup Guide V11

Create Internet-connected weather projects with the SparkFun Weather Shield for the Photon.

Arduino Weather Shield Hookup Guide V12

Read humidity, pressure and luminosity quickly and easily. Add wind speed, direction and rain gauge for full weather station capabilities.

Weather Station Wirelessly Connected to Wunderground

Build your own open-source, official Wunderground weather station that connects over WiFi via an Electric Imp.

Email / Message / Custom Notifiers


We’ve talked about collecting information but what about displaying information? Between email, social media, news feeds and all of the other things in our life vying for our attention, we’re constantly inundated with alerts. But what if we could get all the information we need at a glance, without living in a world of push notifications? This is another central promise of IoT. Devices in this category, like physical email notifiers, have been around since before Internet of Things was a catchphrase, and there have been countless takes on the idea of a subtle, elegant notifier.

Here are a few projects in this category that I liked from hackster.io



And here we are doing it again!


“So… it’s already been done?”

Yeah, but so what? It hasn’t been done your way! These are all great projects, especially when you’re just getting started with IoT and need something to follow along with. And you can always tweak something to make your version better or different or weird.

So are there projects that are missing from this list? Do you have a favorite IoT “Hello World” project? Tell me about it in the comments section below!

comments | comment feed

IoTuesday: The Three IoT Projects that Everyone’s Done (Twice)

via SparkFun Electronics Blog Posts

When you spend as much time as we do looking at people’s awesome DIY IoT devices, you notice a few things. One is that IoT is a popular idea, and there are a lot of people who are ready to have this tech in their homes. The other is that basically everyone wants IoT to do one of three things: automate their appliances, check the weather or provide at-a-glance info.

This isn’t a condemnation of those ideas or the people who build their projects around them. I think these are just the services people expect from IoT right now, so that’s the problem they’re trying to solve. And they’re solving it well, in all kinds of ways!

Here’s an overview of the three most common IoT projects and why I think they’re great:

Remote Appliance Switch

The number of times in a brainstorming meeting that I’ve said, “Maybe we can turn a whatever on and off with it, like from a smart-phone,” is nearly uncountable. We already have tons of household appliances that are smarter than the computers that put Apollo 11 on the moon; let’s turn them on from the other room! This also happens to be the “Hello World” of IoT: You’re getting an input from the internet and controlling one bit with it. The ease with which you can make a platform do this is often a good measure of how nice that platform will be for IoT in general.

Here are a few projects in this category that I liked from hackster.io



And, of course, here’s where we did it!


Weather Monitoring Station


Whether your station is in service of citizen science or just in service of helping you get dressed appropriately in the morning, having your own automated weather observations is undeniably handy. Also, weather stations comprise a nice variety of sensors and therefore make a good test platform for streaming different kinds of measurements to the web and displaying them in a way that makes sense. Bonus points if your weather station posts to Weather Underground or some other weather station network!

Here are a few projects in this category that I liked from hackster.io



And here are our weather related IoT builds

Photon Remote Temperature Sensor

Learn how to build your own Internet-connect, solar-powered temperature collection station using the Photon from Particle.

Photon Weather Shield Hookup Guide V11

Create Internet-connected weather projects with the SparkFun Weather Shield for the Photon.

Arduino Weather Shield Hookup Guide V12

Read humidity, pressure and luminosity quickly and easily. Add wind speed, direction and rain gauge for full weather station capabilities.

Weather Station Wirelessly Connected to Wunderground

Build your own open-source, official Wunderground weather station that connects over WiFi via an Electric Imp.

Email / Message / Custom Notifiers


We’ve talked about collecting information but what about displaying information? Between email, social media, news feeds and all of the other things in our life vying for our attention, we’re constantly inundated with alerts. But what if we could get all the information we need at a glance, without living in a world of push notifications? This is another central promise of IoT. Devices in this category, like physical email notifiers, have been around since before Internet of Things was a catchphrase, and there have been countless takes on the idea of a subtle, elegant notifier.

Here are a few projects in this category that I liked from hackster.io



And here we are doing it again!


“So… it’s already been done?”

Yeah, but so what? It hasn’t been done your way! These are all great projects, especially when you’re just getting started with IoT and need something to follow along with. And you can always tweak something to make your version better or different or weird.

So are there projects that are missing from this list? Do you have a favorite IoT “Hello World” project? Tell me about it in the comments section below!

comments | comment feed