Tag Archives: 3d printing

A tutorial about avoiding warping with Arduino Materia 101

via Arduino Blog

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Some of you may have experienced that when you start to print a cube or box-shaped objects they can easily warp on the corners. The reason for this is the change of volume that plastic goes through when cooling down: it shrinks when becoming cooler. Even if PLA, the corn-based plastic we use on the Arduino Materia 101, shrinks much less than ABS, it can become a problem when printing things that require a high level of precision.

That’s why Kristoffer prepared a tutorial to solve the problem and shares some 3dprinting tricks with all of you. Follow the 5 steps of the tutorial and learn how to print without warping.

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Check the previous tutorials on 3d printing with Material 101

Interested in getting in touch and showing your experiments? Join Kristoffer on the Arduino forum dedicated to Materia 101 and give us your feedback.

Partnerships | Join MakerBot at SOLIDWORKS World 2015

via MakerBot

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The Superbowl isn’t the only big-ticket event to come to Phoenix, AZ this month. MakerBot will be joining our friends at Dassault Systèmes for SOLIDWORKS World 2015, a gathering of over 5,000 CAD designers and other users of the popular SOLIDWORKS 3D modeling software.

Attendees can check out exciting speakers and training workshops, including a keynote speech from former MakerBot CEO Bre Pettis.

Let SOLIDWORKS and MakerBot Help You Travel in Style
We’ll be co-hosting the “3D Print Zone” in the Product Showcase in the main exhibition hall, which will give visitors the opportunity to customize a 3D printable luggage tag in SOLIDWORKS 2015, and 3D print it directly to one of six MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D Printers on site. Come by and witness the latest advancements in creating a seamless 3D printing workflow between SOLIDWORKS and the MakerBot 3D Ecosystem.

Get A Free Pass to the Exhibition Hall
MakerBot and SOLIDWORKS fans in the Phoenix area can register for a free exhibit hall pass to attend conference (a $250 value) using the promo code SWW15EX11.

See you there!

Now you can 3d print lego- compatible LED bricks

via Arduino Blog

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The 3d printing tutorial Kristoffer, our 3d specialist, prepared this week is not part of the ongoing LEGO power functions compatible series but makes you still play around modding the famous bricks to add some cool light effects.

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If you follow the 8 easy steps you’ll be able to print bricks with Arduino Materia 101 that can include addressable LED’s in your models. As in the previous tutorials, he modelled it using FreeCAD, but the way he did it should be applicable to just about any CAD-software or 3d modelling software.

Notice that in the last step of the tutorial you can also download the perfect settings to obtain good prints out of small pieces!

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Check the previous tutorials on 3d printing with Material 101

Interested in getting in touch and showing your experiments? Join Kristoffer on the Arduino forum dedicated to Materia 101 and give us your feedback.

Circular Knitic and the power of doers in open source

via Arduino Blog

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Circular Knitic is an open hardware project created for DOERS, an exhibition curated by Arduino co-founder David Cuartielles, which takes place at Etopia Center for Art & Technology in Zaragoza, Spain.

It consists of an exhibition and a series of presentations, workshops and seminars focusing on the world of open creation, invention and personal fabrication. It aims to unveil a variety of extraordinary creations, ideas that are transforming the world, but mostly show visitors a group of people: “the DOERS, constantly looking for new projects that surprise us”.

During a period of eight months, 5 knitting machines will be knitting slowly and produce enough tubulars so that the ceiling of the art centre will be covered with knitted scarves.

Using digital fabrication and maker tools like 3D printing, laser cutting, makerbeam, and Arduino Uno— Knitic duo designed a replicable circular knitting machine. It’s not the first time they experiment on knitting techniques. A couple of years ago I interviewed them on this blog for their previous project focused on giving a new brain to old knitting machines using Arduino Due.

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Various designers are experimenting with 3D printing in fashion but this doesn’t mean  to 3d print garments directly. Knitic approach shows how digital fabrication could have greater impact on the way clothes are prototyped and produced, especially on producing new concepts of machines:

In maker culture, production of textiles is often overlooked. Circular Knitic demonstrates that beautiful textiles can be produced with digital fabrication tools.

Most of Circular Knitic parts are made with  RepRap 3D printers, some others are made of plexiglass that can be easily lasercut in a fablab. Instructions and all the stl files for the components are available for download on the project’s GitHub page.

The videos below shows the building of the machines and when they are in action.

 

Design a LEGO-compatible servo holder and print it with Materia 101

via Arduino Blog

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This week we are presenting you a new tutorial on 3d printing of Lego-compatible pieces with Materia 101. Kristoffer designed a brick with the parametric 3d modeler FreeCAD that can hold a small servo. Following the 10-step instructions  you can easily add wheels to robots built in LEGO and  use specific servos with different sizes.


Check the previous tutorials on 3d printing with Material 101

Interested in getting in touch and showing your experiments? Join Kristoffer on the Arduino forum dedicated to Materia 101 and give us your feedback.

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MakerBot Stories | A New Frontier in Tracheal Repair

via MakerBot

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Your trachea, or windpipe, connects the throat and lungs. Air comes in through the windpipe; carbon dioxide goes out.

If it is torn or diseased, surgeons have two ways to fix it. They can remove the damaged part and attach the healthy ends, but there’s only so much slack. Or they can extract some rib cartilage and graft it into the windpipe, which is also made of cartilage. Additional surgery has risks, however. So some patients can’t be helped.

But what if doctors could grow you a new piece of windpipe, just the size and shape you need, from your own cartilage cells?

For the past year, the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, in Manhasset, NY, has been exploring this question in collaboration with MakerBot.

The team of surgeons and scientists at the Feinstein Institute, the research branch of the North Shore-LIJ Health System, has grown cartilage on a scaffolding made from ordinary MakerBot PLA Filament. Their remarkable results, early investigations that might lead to a clinical breakthrough, are being presented today at the annual meeting of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, in San Diego, CA.

Tissue Engineering + 3D Printing = New Possibilities

The Feinstein Institute’s findings build on innovations in two emerging fields: 3D printing and tissue engineering. Tissue engineering is like other kinds of engineering, except, instead of using steel or computer code to make things, living cells — skin, muscle, cartilage — are the raw material.

Researchers already know how to make cartilage from a mixture of cells called chondrocytes, nutrients to feed them, and collagen, which holds it all together. Shaping that cartilage into a nose or a windpipe is more challenging.

That’s where 3D printing comes in. The hope is to use a 3D printer to construct a scaffolding and cover it in a mixture of chondrocytes and collagen, which grows into cartilage. There are 3D printers that can extrude living cells, but options are few and expensive; one bioprinter cost $180,000 —beyond the Feinstein Institute’s budget.

So, at the end of 2013, Todd Goldstein, an investigator at the Feinstein Institute, called MakerBot. After several conversations, MakerBot agreed to provide the Feinstein Institute with two MakerBot Replicator 3D Printers, MakerBot PLA Filament, and expert advice in 3D modeling, 3D printing, and materials.

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Real-Time Prototyping with Surgeons

Creating a replacement windpipe is uncharted medical territory. It has to be rigid enough to withstand coughs and sneezes, yet flexible enough to allow the neck to move freely.

To develop the scaffolding, Goldstein teamed up with two North Shore-LIJ surgeons who specialize in repairing windpipes. Goldstein would make prototypes of the scaffolding, then bring the prototypes to the surgeons to examine them. Goldstein would adjust his designs based on their feedback, and return in a day or two with an improved design.

Working this way, the Feinstein Institute team was able to develop a strong, flexible scaffolding design in less than a month. Goldstein, who had never used a 3D printer before his call to MakerBot, tested about 100 versions of the scaffolding. When he hit a design snag, he consulted with a designer at MakerBot, who analyzed the 3D files and suggested ways to optimize them for 3D printing.

“The ability to prototype, examine, touch, feel, and then redesign within minutes, within hours, allows for the creation of this type of technology,” says Dr. Lee Smith, a pediatric otolaryngologist at North Shore-LIJ who worked with Goldstein. “If we had to send out these designs to a commercial printer far away and get the designs back one and three and seven weeks later, we’d never be where we are today.”

“Without the 3D printers to do this, the amount of capital we would need would be exponential,” says Goldstein.

Experimenting with the MakerBot Replicator 2X

The next challenge the Feinstein Institute team faced was how to grow the cells on the scaffolding. To test the idea, Goldstein used a handheld syringe to apply the mixture of chondrocytes and collagen to the scaffolding. It was, he said, “like putting icing on a cake.”

After further consultation, MakerBot provided the Feinstein Institute with a MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printer, which has two extruders. Goldstein converted it into a low-cost bioprinter by replacing one extruder with a syringe that dispenses the chondrocyte-collagen “bio-ink.”

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To mount the syringe on the MakerBot Replicator 2X, Goldstein modified a universal paste extruder that he found on Thingiverse. The paste extruder, which Thingiverse user nicksears remixed from other extruder parts, is in fact designed to put icing on a cake.

Goldstein modified the other extruder to print in PLA filament instead of ABS. “The advantage of PLA is that it’s used in all kinds of surgical implant devices,” says Dr. Smith, the pediatric surgeon. Goldstein found that the heat from the extruder head sterilizes the PLA as it prints, so he was able to use ordinary MakerBot PLA Filament.

The bio-ink, which stays at room temperature, fills the gaps in the PLA scaffolding, and then cures into a gel on the heated build plate of the MakerBot Replicator 2X. A two-inch-long section of windpipe (imagine a hollowed-out Tootsie Roll) takes less than two hours to print.

Once the bio-ink adheres to the scaffolding, it goes into a bioreactor, which will keep the cells warm and growing evenly. A new bioreactor costs between $50,000 and $150,000, so Goldstein found a broken incubator. With the help of an undergraduate intern, he is converting it into a bioreactor, with gears fabricated on a MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer.

Proof of Concept

At the conference, Goldstein and Dr. David Zeltsman, the chief of thoracic surgery at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, are presenting the Feinstein Institute’s results from its investigations into how 3D printed windpipe segments held up for four weeks in an incubator. According to their abstract, “The cells survived the printing process, were able to continue dividing, and produce the extracellular matrix expected of tracheal chondrocytes.” In other words, they were growing like windpipe cartilage.

The Feinstein Institute is describing this work as a “proof of concept,” and the team still has plenty of work to do before establishing a new protocol for repairing or replacing damaged windpipes. Medical research can take years to move from bench to bedside, as can Food and Drug Administration approval.

Dr. Smith, the pediatric surgeon, says that he expects in the next five years to harvest a patient’s cells, grow them on a scaffolding, and repair a windpipe. At least one tracheal patient comes through the North Shore-LIJ Health System each year who can’t be helped by the two established methods. In such cases, the FDA has a compassionate therapy exception that allows you to try a promising experimental method like a 3D printed windpipe.

New Careers and The Future of Medicine

The windpipe experiment has already made a profound impact on the research team.

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“It’s completely changed the trajectory of my academic career,” says Goldstein, who came to the Feinstein Institute as a molecular biologist, working with cells, chemicals, and drugs. Combining this knowledge with 3D printing and getting into tissue engineering — “I didn’t expect that at all when I got here.”

Now he is the Feinstein Institute’s lead researcher for 3D bioprinting, making models for pre-operative planning and tools to improve the lab. He is also the presenting author of a paper being delivered to thousands of surgeons, and is applying for major grants to continue his research. “Knowing that I could potentially have designed something that will end up saving someone’s child is the most exciting thing I could ever ask for,” Goldstein says.

“This project will probably define my scientific career,” says Dr. Smith. “As we produce something that can replace a segment of trachea, we’ll constantly be modifying and optimizing, the correct bio materials, the correct way to bond the cells to the scaffold.”

“3D printing and tissue engineering have the potential to replace lots of different parts of the human body,” he says. “The potential for creating replacement parts is almost limitless.”

So what’s next? MakerBot has supplied the Feinstein Institute with early samples of forthcoming MakerBot PLA Composite Filaments in Limestone and Iron, so the team can start investigating other applications of 3D printing and tissue engineering.

“Do you remember The Six Million Dollar Man?,” asks Daniel Grande, director of orthopedic research at the Feinstein Institute and Goldstein’s mentor. “The Bionic Man is not the future, it’s the present. We have that ability to do that now. It’s really exciting.”

MakerBot Stories | Feinstein Institute for Medical Research from MakerBot on Vimeo.

Programmable 3d-printed decorations for your Xmas

via Arduino Blog

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We can’t miss the chance to play with some LEDs now that holidays are coming and mix some electronics with 3d printing on Materia 101.

In the tutorial of this Kristoffer is experimenting on Xmas decorations, Arduino Micro and some code to play around with.

The result is what you see in the picture below!
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Do you want to make it too? Follow the steps on Scuola >>
Check the previous tutorials on 3d printing with Material 101

Interested in getting in touch and showing your experiments? Join Kristoffer on the Arduino forum dedicated to Materia 101 and give us your feedback.

How to print a Pirate Hook with your Materia 101

via Arduino Blog

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Using a 3d printer means playing with some hardware but especially some softwares. In the tutorial of this week, the fourth tutorial of our series , Kris is going to introduce you how to work with Slic3r, a G-Code generator for 3d printers and basically a tool you need to convert a digital 3D model into printing instructions for your 3D printer. Slic3r is an open source software able to cut the model into horizontal slices (layers), generates toolpaths to fill them and calculates the amount of material to be extruded so that you can reach good results.

The object you’ll be able to print with your Materia 101 is a pirate hook !

Follow the 12 steps on Scuola and print yours >>

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Check the previous tutorials on 3d printing with Material 101

Interested in getting in touch and showing your experiments? Join Kristoffer on the Arduino forum dedicated to Materia 101 and give us your feedback.

 

Making something useful for your home with Materia 101

via Arduino Blog

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When you become a happy owner of a Materia 101 3d printer, the first days are really important to start experimenting with the right attitude. Understanding quickly how to get what you want from it means becoming aware of the potential applications of the 3d printing technology in your environment.

Last week we published  the tutorial  on  “Getting started with Materia 101″ created by Kristoffer  and kicking off a series of step-by-step guides to explore different topics, softwares and settings for your 3d printer.

Take a look at the second tutorial focused on  fixing things at home: “Making something useful” tutorial shows you how to start from a need, to design and print a solution. It feels great to be able to fix what’s broken!

Interested in getting in touch and showing your experiments? Join Kristoffer on the Arduino forum and give us your feedback.

Next week we are going to post a tutorial on how to create 3d-printed cases for Arduino boards. Stay tuned.

Hashtag: #Materia101

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WiFi-controlled pottery kiln

via Raspberry Pi

I’ve always fantasised about having a kiln in the garage (Eben wants a pick and place machine; we need another garage). Kilns, though, are expensive. And where do you start if you want to refurbish a broken or old one safely?

James Gao has an answer, and it’s got a Raspberry Pi in it. (Well, not in it, but attached very firmly to it.

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James’s girlfriend is an enthusiastic potter, and James is an equally enthusiastic hacker. They came together and made beautiful music a kiln. The project is based around an old electric kiln, which James built holes into to convert it into a propane-fired updraft kiln. A Raspberry Pi is hooked up to a thermocouple and a stepper motor that controls the propane regulator. James 3d-printed gears and a clamp to operate the regulator/motor setup.

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Stepper motor and propane regulator

The kiln operates via a PID, which controls the temperature taking closed-loop feedback from the thermocouple to the regulator. Adjustments can be made remotely; the kiln controller system has WiFi. James has a really interesting series of photographs, with explanatory text and some examples of test firings, over at imgur; he also answers questions about the project at Reddit.

Results of two test firings

Results of two test firings – the variously floppy things are pyrometric cones, used to measure temperature in different parts of the kiln.

There are so many reasons I love this project. It’s a wonderful demonstration of what can be done with no specialised experience (James had never worked with kilns before starting this project, and neither he nor his girlfriend had any knowledge about firing pottery). The ingenuity on show is just brilliant (3d-printed gears!), the pottery that comes out of the end is immensely satisfying – and face it; there’s something very thrilling about flames. On top of all this, the whole project came in at less than $200.

All James’s control software, along with a BOM, is open-source, and available on GitHub.

Arduino Materia 101 is available for pre-order

via Arduino Blog

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During Maker Faire Rome we announced and gave a preview of our new project called Arduino Materia 101, the 3d printer developed in collaboration with Sharebot.

We are happy to announce that starting today the 3d printer is available for pre-order (30 days delivery time) from Arduino Store :

We can also share with you a list of documentation to learn all the details about it:

  • Product page with downloadable PDFs of
    • Use Manual in English and Italian
    • Assembly Manual (soon online in Italian and  in English)

In the next weeks we are going to post on the blog some cool hacks and user profiles to make it even easier to enjoy with the 3d printer.

 

Open-source syringe pump

via Raspberry Pi

If you’re unlucky enough to have required precise, timed doses of drugs through an IV in hospital; or if you’ve worked in a lab where controlled amounts of chemicals have needed to be added to an experiment on schedule, you’ll be intimately familiar with syringe pumps. They look like this.

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And they’re expensive. The one in the picture above, which was the cheapest I could find (in an admittedly very quick and dirty Googling session) costs $750. As with a lot of specialised scientific equipment, that means that it’s difficult for hospitals with restricted incomes, or for labs with a lot of overheads, to get their hands on as many as they need for their work. This applies to cash-strapped university departments and hospitals in your town every bit as much as it applies to organisations in the developing world: equipment like this can be prohibitively costly wherever you are.

Joshua Pearce led a team of graduates and undergraduates from Michigan Tech‘s Open Sustainability Technology Lab in a project that intended to do something about that. They have created an open-source, 3D-printed syringe pump that can be made for a fraction of the cost of existing pumps, using an off-the-shelf motor and bearings, which is driven by a Raspberry Pi. The whole system comes in at about $50: that’s a fifteenth the price of the pump in the picture above, and it performs exactly the same task, in exactly the same way.

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The plastic parts are made with a 3D printer; a Raspberry Pi acts as a control and calibration unit.

Megan Frost is a biological researcher at Michigan Tech, who has been using the open-source syringe pump in her work with cell cultures. She says:

“What’s beautiful about what Joshua is doing is that it lets us run three or four experiments in parallel, because we can get the equipment for so much less,” she said. “We’d always wanted to run experiments concurrently, but we couldn’t because the syringe pumps cost so much. This has really opened doors for us.”

Cost can be a devastating barrier to entry to the sciences, and for basic health needs like pharmaceuticals delivery. One of the things we were trying to address when we created the Pi was the high cost of computing. We’re strong believers in democratising access to technology, and this project’s a perfect example of how to do that.

Arduino MATERIA 101: simplifying access to the world of 3D printing

via Arduino Blog

After the sneak peak of some days ago, we are happy to officially announce the Arduino 3d printer . Completely open source and affordable, Arduino Materia 101 is a device aiming at simplifying access to the world of 3D printing and rapid prototyping.

Materia 101 is a precision 3D printer running on Arduino Mega, designed and developed in Italy, thanks to the collaboration of Arduino and Sharebot, two companies working with a similar approach to technology. It is ideal for beginners, makers and education.

Materia 101’s visual identity is curated by studio ToDo: the choice of essentiality of design and the white color of the machine suggests its ease of use.

The printer will be available only on the Arduino Store both as a kit and pre-assembled. Official pricing of the device will be disclosed at a later date but the kit will sell for less than 600 EUR/800 USD, while the pre-assembled version will be available for less than 700 EUR/1000 USD.
The official presentation will be held during Maker Faire Rome, 3-5 October 2014. 

Technical characteristics:
Printing technology: Fused Filament Fabrication
Printing area: 140 x 100 x 100 mm +/- 5mm
X and Y theorical resolution position: 0,06 mm
Z resolution: 0.0025 mm
Extrusion diameter: 0.35 mm
Filament diameter: 1.75 mm
Optimal temperatures with PLA: 200-230°
Tested and supported filaments: PLA
Unsupported but tested filaments: Cristal Flex, PLA Thermosense, Thermoplastic Polyuretane
(TPU), PET, PLA Sand, PLA Flex
External dimensions: 310 x 330 x 350 mm
Weight: 10 kg
Usage: 65 watt
Electronical board: Official Arduino Mega 2560 with Open Source Marlin Firmware
LCD display 20 x 4 with encoder menu
Preloaded with PLA printing presets
Extruder block with filament pressure regulation

A “Draw it yourself” midi controller with a 3d-printed case

via Arduino Blog

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‘Draw It Yourself’ is a MIDI controller created by Dani Sanz which uses conductive ink as push-buttons. It is based on Arduino Uno and uses a capacitive sensor to determine whether the drawn buttons are being touched or not:

This was my second semester project for the Interactive Music Systems Design Course (CDSIM) at the Music Technology Group (MTG) at University Pompeu Fabra of Barcelona. I presented this project at Sonar+D, part of the Sonar festival of Barcelona, held between June 12th and 14th 2014.

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It can be used for multiple applications, not only for music! You can download the Fritzing  and make it yourself on the Instructable and see it in action with this video:

 

PiGrrl

via Raspberry Pi

Adafruit’s 3D Thursday series is getting us terribly excited every time they roll out a new project with a Pi in it. Yesterday’s was a doozy: so much so that the engineering team stood around my desk and made puppy-dog eyes and sighing sounds at me until I agreed to email LadyAda and beg a demo sample of the project from them. (She says she’s sending the pink one, Gordon, just to punish you for being so demanding.)

Meet the extraordinary PiGrrl, a home-baked Raspberry Pi clone of the Game Boy.

If you don’t think that’s the best thing ever, you’re dead inside.
As always with Adafruit projects, the PiGrrl is documented minutely; you can find a complete tutorial on their website, along with files for the 3d printer at Thingiverse. This is one of the more complicated builds we’ve featured, but we think the results speak for themselves

LadyAda says: “Woohoo!” After careful consideration, so do we.