Tag Archives: 3d printing

Programmable 3d-printed decorations for your Xmas

via Arduino Blog

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We can’t miss the chance to play with some LEDs now that holidays are coming and mix some electronics with 3d printing on Materia 101.

In the tutorial of this Kristoffer is experimenting on Xmas decorations, Arduino Micro and some code to play around with.

The result is what you see in the picture below!
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Do you want to make it too? Follow the steps on Scuola >>
Check the previous tutorials on 3d printing with Material 101

Interested in getting in touch and showing your experiments? Join Kristoffer on the Arduino forum dedicated to Materia 101 and give us your feedback.

How to print a Pirate Hook with your Materia 101

via Arduino Blog

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Using a 3d printer means playing with some hardware but especially some softwares. In the tutorial of this week, the fourth tutorial of our series , Kris is going to introduce you how to work with Slic3r, a G-Code generator for 3d printers and basically a tool you need to convert a digital 3D model into printing instructions for your 3D printer. Slic3r is an open source software able to cut the model into horizontal slices (layers), generates toolpaths to fill them and calculates the amount of material to be extruded so that you can reach good results.

The object you’ll be able to print with your Materia 101 is a pirate hook !

Follow the 12 steps on Scuola and print yours >>

piratehook

Check the previous tutorials on 3d printing with Material 101

Interested in getting in touch and showing your experiments? Join Kristoffer on the Arduino forum dedicated to Materia 101 and give us your feedback.

 

Making something useful for your home with Materia 101

via Arduino Blog

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When you become a happy owner of a Materia 101 3d printer, the first days are really important to start experimenting with the right attitude. Understanding quickly how to get what you want from it means becoming aware of the potential applications of the 3d printing technology in your environment.

Last week we published  the tutorial  on  “Getting started with Materia 101″ created by Kristoffer  and kicking off a series of step-by-step guides to explore different topics, softwares and settings for your 3d printer.

Take a look at the second tutorial focused on  fixing things at home: “Making something useful” tutorial shows you how to start from a need, to design and print a solution. It feels great to be able to fix what’s broken!

Interested in getting in touch and showing your experiments? Join Kristoffer on the Arduino forum and give us your feedback.

Next week we are going to post a tutorial on how to create 3d-printed cases for Arduino boards. Stay tuned.

Hashtag: #Materia101

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WiFi-controlled pottery kiln

via Raspberry Pi

I’ve always fantasised about having a kiln in the garage (Eben wants a pick and place machine; we need another garage). Kilns, though, are expensive. And where do you start if you want to refurbish a broken or old one safely?

James Gao has an answer, and it’s got a Raspberry Pi in it. (Well, not in it, but attached very firmly to it.

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James’s girlfriend is an enthusiastic potter, and James is an equally enthusiastic hacker. They came together and made beautiful music a kiln. The project is based around an old electric kiln, which James built holes into to convert it into a propane-fired updraft kiln. A Raspberry Pi is hooked up to a thermocouple and a stepper motor that controls the propane regulator. James 3d-printed gears and a clamp to operate the regulator/motor setup.

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Stepper motor and propane regulator

The kiln operates via a PID, which controls the temperature taking closed-loop feedback from the thermocouple to the regulator. Adjustments can be made remotely; the kiln controller system has WiFi. James has a really interesting series of photographs, with explanatory text and some examples of test firings, over at imgur; he also answers questions about the project at Reddit.

Results of two test firings

Results of two test firings – the variously floppy things are pyrometric cones, used to measure temperature in different parts of the kiln.

There are so many reasons I love this project. It’s a wonderful demonstration of what can be done with no specialised experience (James had never worked with kilns before starting this project, and neither he nor his girlfriend had any knowledge about firing pottery). The ingenuity on show is just brilliant (3d-printed gears!), the pottery that comes out of the end is immensely satisfying – and face it; there’s something very thrilling about flames. On top of all this, the whole project came in at less than $200.

All James’s control software, along with a BOM, is open-source, and available on GitHub.

Arduino Materia 101 is available for pre-order

via Arduino Blog

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During Maker Faire Rome we announced and gave a preview of our new project called Arduino Materia 101, the 3d printer developed in collaboration with Sharebot.

We are happy to announce that starting today the 3d printer is available for pre-order (30 days delivery time) from Arduino Store :

We can also share with you a list of documentation to learn all the details about it:

  • Product page with downloadable PDFs of
    • Use Manual in English and Italian
    • Assembly Manual (soon online in Italian and  in English)

In the next weeks we are going to post on the blog some cool hacks and user profiles to make it even easier to enjoy with the 3d printer.

 

Open-source syringe pump

via Raspberry Pi

If you’re unlucky enough to have required precise, timed doses of drugs through an IV in hospital; or if you’ve worked in a lab where controlled amounts of chemicals have needed to be added to an experiment on schedule, you’ll be intimately familiar with syringe pumps. They look like this.

syringe pump

And they’re expensive. The one in the picture above, which was the cheapest I could find (in an admittedly very quick and dirty Googling session) costs $750. As with a lot of specialised scientific equipment, that means that it’s difficult for hospitals with restricted incomes, or for labs with a lot of overheads, to get their hands on as many as they need for their work. This applies to cash-strapped university departments and hospitals in your town every bit as much as it applies to organisations in the developing world: equipment like this can be prohibitively costly wherever you are.

Joshua Pearce led a team of graduates and undergraduates from Michigan Tech‘s Open Sustainability Technology Lab in a project that intended to do something about that. They have created an open-source, 3D-printed syringe pump that can be made for a fraction of the cost of existing pumps, using an off-the-shelf motor and bearings, which is driven by a Raspberry Pi. The whole system comes in at about $50: that’s a fifteenth the price of the pump in the picture above, and it performs exactly the same task, in exactly the same way.

open syringe pump

The plastic parts are made with a 3D printer; a Raspberry Pi acts as a control and calibration unit.

Megan Frost is a biological researcher at Michigan Tech, who has been using the open-source syringe pump in her work with cell cultures. She says:

“What’s beautiful about what Joshua is doing is that it lets us run three or four experiments in parallel, because we can get the equipment for so much less,” she said. “We’d always wanted to run experiments concurrently, but we couldn’t because the syringe pumps cost so much. This has really opened doors for us.”

Cost can be a devastating barrier to entry to the sciences, and for basic health needs like pharmaceuticals delivery. One of the things we were trying to address when we created the Pi was the high cost of computing. We’re strong believers in democratising access to technology, and this project’s a perfect example of how to do that.

Arduino MATERIA 101: simplifying access to the world of 3D printing

via Arduino Blog

After the sneak peak of some days ago, we are happy to officially announce the Arduino 3d printer . Completely open source and affordable, Arduino Materia 101 is a device aiming at simplifying access to the world of 3D printing and rapid prototyping.

Materia 101 is a precision 3D printer running on Arduino Mega, designed and developed in Italy, thanks to the collaboration of Arduino and Sharebot, two companies working with a similar approach to technology. It is ideal for beginners, makers and education.

Materia 101’s visual identity is curated by studio ToDo: the choice of essentiality of design and the white color of the machine suggests its ease of use.

The printer will be available only on the Arduino Store both as a kit and pre-assembled. Official pricing of the device will be disclosed at a later date but the kit will sell for less than 600 EUR/800 USD, while the pre-assembled version will be available for less than 700 EUR/1000 USD.
The official presentation will be held during Maker Faire Rome, 3-5 October 2014. 

Technical characteristics:
Printing technology: Fused Filament Fabrication
Printing area: 140 x 100 x 100 mm +/- 5mm
X and Y theorical resolution position: 0,06 mm
Z resolution: 0.0025 mm
Extrusion diameter: 0.35 mm
Filament diameter: 1.75 mm
Optimal temperatures with PLA: 200-230°
Tested and supported filaments: PLA
Unsupported but tested filaments: Cristal Flex, PLA Thermosense, Thermoplastic Polyuretane
(TPU), PET, PLA Sand, PLA Flex
External dimensions: 310 x 330 x 350 mm
Weight: 10 kg
Usage: 65 watt
Electronical board: Official Arduino Mega 2560 with Open Source Marlin Firmware
LCD display 20 x 4 with encoder menu
Preloaded with PLA printing presets
Extruder block with filament pressure regulation

A “Draw it yourself” midi controller with a 3d-printed case

via Arduino Blog

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‘Draw It Yourself’ is a MIDI controller created by Dani Sanz which uses conductive ink as push-buttons. It is based on Arduino Uno and uses a capacitive sensor to determine whether the drawn buttons are being touched or not:

This was my second semester project for the Interactive Music Systems Design Course (CDSIM) at the Music Technology Group (MTG) at University Pompeu Fabra of Barcelona. I presented this project at Sonar+D, part of the Sonar festival of Barcelona, held between June 12th and 14th 2014.

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It can be used for multiple applications, not only for music! You can download the Fritzing  and make it yourself on the Instructable and see it in action with this video:

 

PiGrrl

via Raspberry Pi

Adafruit’s 3D Thursday series is getting us terribly excited every time they roll out a new project with a Pi in it. Yesterday’s was a doozy: so much so that the engineering team stood around my desk and made puppy-dog eyes and sighing sounds at me until I agreed to email LadyAda and beg a demo sample of the project from them. (She says she’s sending the pink one, Gordon, just to punish you for being so demanding.)

Meet the extraordinary PiGrrl, a home-baked Raspberry Pi clone of the Game Boy.

If you don’t think that’s the best thing ever, you’re dead inside.
As always with Adafruit projects, the PiGrrl is documented minutely; you can find a complete tutorial on their website, along with files for the 3d printer at Thingiverse. This is one of the more complicated builds we’ve featured, but we think the results speak for themselves

LadyAda says: “Woohoo!” After careful consideration, so do we.

MakerBot Stories | University Gets First Innovation Center

via MakerBot

The State University of New York at New Paltz is home to the world’s first MakerBot Innovation Center: a ground-floor room with 30 MakerBot Replicator 3D Printers. “3D printing is training students to think in a different way,” says Dan Freedman, dean of science and engineering at New Paltz. “If students come out of here knowing about 3D printing and different applications of it, it will give them a better chance of starting a career.”

The Innovation Center, which has a combination of MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printers and MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printers, is located in the Smiley Arts Building, and sculptors and jewelry designers have been flocking there since it opened in February. Engineers and scientists, whose sit across the quad, are also heavy users of the facility.

It’s not only college students at the center. Faculty from many disciplines and other New Paltz staff have attended sessions with MakerBot trainers. Local artists and manufacturers, as well as others who want to learn about 3D printing without pursuing a degree, can enroll in a two-semester program in digital design and fabrication. And New Paltz has plans to bring in students from local public schools. For bringing the community together, says Freedman, “the only thing similar is the gym.”

Interested in a MakerBot Innovation Center? Let us know.

The MakerBot Innovation Center at New Paltz is part of The Hudson Valley Advanced Manufacturing Center, a $1.5 million initiative to spur regional economic development. The advanced manufacturing center received $250,000 donations from a local venture-capital fund and a matching grant from the regional utility company. “It was the easiest donation this college has ever gotten,” says Freedman, “We were in the right place at the right time.”

“This is a technology that is just starting, and it’s going to become increasingly important,” says Freedman, who thinks that the university’s investment in 3D printing will make New Paltz the right place for budding artists and the engineers of tomorrow.

Katherine Wilson, a student in New Paltz’s renowned Metal program, says, “When I was looking for graduate schools, I was interested in what kind of technology was available.” Before opening the Innovation Center, New Paltz had a few MakerBot Replicator 3D Printers, and she was careful not to monopolize them. Access to an array of 30 3D printers has freed up Wilson to follow her imagination wherever it takes her.

Freedman adds, “I think we can attract some really outstanding students who are undecided between science-engineering and art and say to them, ‘You can pursue your interests in both areas, and we’re going to make it easier for you to do that.’”

MakerBot Academy | 3D Print a Brand New Jump Rope

via MakerBot

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MakerBot Academy is linking physical fitness with creativity and design. Teachers, parents, and kids will love 3D printing and using the MakerBot Academy Jump Rope. Ready to download from Thingiverse, this useful design can be printed in your favorite colors and scaled to fit most sizes.

Hop over to Thingiverse and check it out.

Mind and Body
Exercise the brain when you learn more about 3D printing and exercise the body when you put your brand new jump rope to use. Get colorfully creative with MakerBot PLA Filament in Neon Pink or Neon Green.

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Summer Fun
From school to home, the MakerBot Academy Jump Rope can be enjoyed throughout the summer. What better way get kids active than with a toy they made themselves?

MakerBot Filament | A Colorful Transformation Is Coming

via MakerBot

photochromatic

Let There Be Light!
Introducing light-responsive MakerBot Photochromatic PLA Filament, which changes color when exposed to ultraviolet rays. Just bring your 3D prints into the sunlight, and watch your natural white prints bloom into subtle shades of magenta or blue.

Order your spools of MakerBot Photochromatic PLA Filament today.

Quick Tip to Brighten Your Print
Don’t let a cloudy or rainy day keep you from activating MakerBot Photochromatic PLA Filament’s chameleon-like properties. Shine a UV flashlight on your prints to activate the color change whenever you want.

Share Your Shine on Thingiverse
Be sure to upload and share pictures of your 3D prints in and out of the sunlight on Thingiverse. We can’t wait to see the transformative designs you’ll create.

MakerBot Learning | A Primer on 3D Printing With MakerBot

via MakerBot

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There’s more to MakerBot than our 3D printers. A Primer on 3D Printing With MakerBot is an interactive exploration that gives you the ins and outs of the extensive MakerBot 3D Ecosystem. The informative full day course, taught by experts in 3D printing, covers 3D design, MakerBot apps, hardware, the growing 3D printing community, and more. The MakerBot Learning course is held near MakerBot headquarters in Brooklyn, NY.

REGISTER NOW

What Will Be Covered?
Through a series of immersive sessions and brief lectures, you’ll gain essential knowledge of a MakerBot Replicator 3D Printer, as well as an in-depth exploration of all the resources the MakerBot 3D printing community has to offer. You’ll actually design your own object for 3D printing and have time to discuss with MakerBot experts your goals for integrating 3D printing into your workflow.

When you leave, you will be able to:
–Setup and use a MakerBot Replicator 3D Printer
–Gain insight into creative applications for 3D printing
–Use MakerBot apps to their fullest extent
–Understand the “Three Ways to Make” and options available for 3D design
–Apply the basics of 3D design to create your own object
–Successfully prepare and print a 3D model
–Properly maintain your MakerBot Replicator 3D Printer

Sign up today and start on your path to becoming a 3D printing explorer.

MakerBot Retail | The MakerBot Mixtape Is Back!

via MakerBot

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Remember the cassette tape? Back in the day, countless romantics created the first mixtapes with nothing but a tape player and good taste. Then CD’s came along and ruined the fun. Now, just like the cassette, the MakerBot Mixtape is making a comeback.

Don’t Let the Retro Look Deceive You
After a two-year hiatus, your favorite 3D printed MP3 player has returned with four gigs of memory, improved user experience, and eye-catching new color schemes. Upload your favorite songs to your MakerBot Mixtape and use it as an MP3 player, or use it as a storage drive for storing your favorite 3D model files.

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3D Printing Meets Hardware
Our customers have been clamoring for designs that incorporate electronics into 3D printed objects. We expect they’ll be the first in line to get their MakerBot Mixtapes. We’re excited to see how our users incorporate electronics into their 3D printed projects in the future.

Stop by a MakerBot Retail Store near you to grab yours!

MakerBot Replicator Mini | Early Orders Start Shipping Today!

via MakerBot

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We are extremely proud to announce that the first MakerBot Replicator Mini Compact 3D Printers are beginning to ship. If you ordered your MakerBot Replicator Mini early, we’ll ship it out over the next few weeks, and email you as soon as we do.

If you haven’t ordered one yet, order your MakerBot Replicator Mini today, and we’ll get it to you as soon as possible.

Update Your Firmware First
When your MakerBot Replicator Mini arrives, be sure to update its firmware to keep it running in tip-top shape, and to unlock all the latest features. MakerBot Desktop will detect which version of firmware your MakerBot Replicator Mini is running, and guide you through the process of updating it.

It’s Time to Get Started
Head over to the MakerBot Thingiverse 3D Design Community to jumpstart your 3D model collection. Stay tuned for more tips and tricks on how to unleash creativity with your educational, entertaining, and useful MakerBot Replicator Mini.