Tag Archives: Adafruit

Graphic equaliser

via Raspberry Pi

Our good friends at Adafruit put this project on their Learning System earlier this month. It’s a beaut: you’ll learn something making it, and it looks fantastic when set up. Before we get into the nitty gritty, here’s some video:

This graphic equaliser (a spectrum analys/zer if you’re from the USA) is made from a RGB led strip, with everything down to the audio processing run on the Pi. Everything you see in the video is happening in real time. The setup runs Python, and is based on LightShowPi (which was originally designed to orchestrate Christmas lights), so you’ll be able add LightShowPi features like SMS control from your phone if you’re an advanced user.

Some soldering is required – but soldering is easy, and this is a good project to earn your soldering wings on if you haven’t already. There’s the usual full and helpful tutorial over at Adafruit, along with tips, a parts list, code and all that good stuff. I wish I’d had one of these for my student bedroom. Imagine the parties!

LED Matrix Clock Project #ArduinoMicroMonday

via Arduino Blog

Martin_Atkins Matrix

Martin Atkins built this great LED matrix clock using an Arduino Microa few bicolor LED matrix displaysdisplay drivers, and a real time clock module Chronodot:

Finally found some time today to solder the parts onto my first OSH Park PCB. The primary motivation for this was to learn Eagle and try out OSH Park, so I wanted to make something with only components I’d already purchased, and that’s why it has a whole Arduino Micro attached to it even though a smaller board (or even just a lone microcontroller) would’ve been sufficient. I didn’t get the displays lined up quite right, so there’s a small gap between them that looks obvious in this photo but isn’t so bad if you’re further away and looking at it head-on. But my learning for next time is to watch out for the positioning of odd-sized components.

LED Matrix Clock Project #ArduinoMicroMonday

via Arduino Blog

Martin_Atkins Matrix

Martin Atkins built this great LED matrix clock using an Arduino Microa few bicolor LED matrix displaysdisplay drivers, and a real time clock module Chronodot:

Finally found some time today to solder the parts onto my first OSH Park PCB. The primary motivation for this was to learn Eagle and try out OSH Park, so I wanted to make something with only components I’d already purchased, and that’s why it has a whole Arduino Micro attached to it even though a smaller board (or even just a lone microcontroller) would’ve been sufficient. I didn’t get the displays lined up quite right, so there’s a small gap between them that looks obvious in this photo but isn’t so bad if you’re further away and looking at it head-on. But my learning for next time is to watch out for the positioning of odd-sized components.

Dave Hunt’s time-lapse touchscreen controller

via Raspberry Pi

Regular readers will know Dave Hunt well. He’s behind some of the…no, scratch that; he’s behind THE most beautiful posts we’ve featured here. (There’s a new example of Dave doing something beautiful with the Pi in this post: you’ll have to read to the bottom before you get to it.)

Dave is a photographer, and he’s used the Raspberry Pi in several different rigs to replace much more expensive specialised hardware. His water droplet photography rig is easy and inexpensive to set up, and it produces extraordinary results. His focus-stacking Pi solution will save you around £600 on a clean macro photography setup; his rising/falling time-lapse rig has taken video that will have you running to the travel agent to book tickets to Ireland as soon as you’ve watched it.

A quick reminder of some of Dave’s previous work with the Pi. Click the image to find out how to take a photo like this yourself.

Dave said last year that he was looking to add more elements to the time-lapse rig (amazing, really, given that it already has features like a little heater to evaporate any dew that threatens to condense on the lens). The rig already raises and lowers the camera in tiny incremental stages as the time-lapse is being shot, so the camera moves as the footage is being taken, which adds a lot of interest to the shot. Dave’s now refined that action by adding touchscreen controls using Adafruit’s PiTFT Mini Kit (which we saw recently being used by the good folks at Adafruit to turn a Raspberry Pi Camera Board into a touchscreen point-and-shoot camera). He adapted Phil Burgess’ graphical user interface (GUI) from that project to create one that controls the length of the pulse sent to the motor, the delay between shots, the number of shots and the motor’s direction.

All this means that where previously the Pi-powered time-lapse rig had to be sent commands wirelessly via a phone or a laptop, it can now be controlled directly from the touchscreen panel mounted on the Pi itself.

The user interface he’s built allows you to position the dolly on the rail via the motor control buttons; change the motor pulse duration between shots; change the delay between shots; change the number of shots; see what time is left for the current sequence; and start and stop the time-lapse.

Dave has provided, as always, a parts list (the whole controller, including the Pi and the screen, will come in at around $100), full instructions, and all the code you’ll need on his website. And the results? We think they speak for themselves.

Stunning Halo 3 Costumes and Energy Sword #ArduinoMicroMonday

via Arduino Blog

halo

 

Adafruit Forum member JoshuaKane writes:

I wanted to share with everyone a project I worked on for a recent sci-fi/comic convention. I have always been a fan of fantasy, sci-fi and comics. A few months ago I started working on an Orbital Drop Shock Trooper (ODST) costume and weapon.

I wanted to make the sword something that would literally make folks stop in their tracks and take notice at a convention. For this I turned to the Arduino Microprocessor and some of the accessories developed at Adafruit.

The full idea is to give the impression of a pulsing energy sword. The perfect item to light this sword are the NeoPixel strips (60 LEDs per meter). The complete package is a sword that would light up when you turned it on, and play a sound indicating that it was switched on.…think Star Wars light saber. Once lit the NeoPixels would pulse from blue to purple to red, and back to blue. What weapon would be complete without sounds? To give the sword a more realistic look and sound we used the ADXL345 to be able to detect motion, this would trigger a sound event via the VS1053 breakout.

To complete the package I used 2x liPo 2600mAh batteries hooked in parallel through a UBEC to give a constant and clean 5v for the LED’s and controller.

The costume is designed by Sean Bradley, who also molded the sword parts out of PET Plastic and Resin. DragonCon photos were provided by Brian Humphrey.

vac

Sword body pieces fresh out of the vacuform machine. These will be painted on the inside.

electronics

 

Arduino Micro, ADXL345 accelerometer and VS1053 audio breakout board are concealed within the cast resin handle.

allparts

 

All the pieces coming together. The bubble wrap is presumably there as an LED diffuser. Clever!

halo duo

 

Completed costumes, ready to wow onlookers at DragonCon!

Touchscreen point-and-shoot, from Adafruit

via Raspberry Pi

LadyAda from Adafruit is one of my very favourite people. We have a tradition of spending at least one evening eating Korean barbecue whenever I visit New York. We have told each other many secrets over bowls of fizzy fermented rice beverage, posed for photographs in front of plastic meats, been filmed pointing at electronics for the New York Times, and behaved very badly together in Pinkberry in September. LadyAda is the perfect combination of super-smart hacker, pink hair and business ninja; her cat Mosfet likes to Skype transatlantically with the Raspberry Pi cat, Mooncake (at least I think that their intense ignoring of each other constitutes “liking”); and we are incredibly fortunate that she saw the Pi and instantly understood what we were trying to do back in 2011. Here she is on the cover of the MagPi. (Click the image to visit the MagPi website, where you can download the issue for free.)

Her business, Adafruit, which employs an army of hackers and makers, does wonderful things with the Pi. They’ve been incredibly helpful to us in getting the word about Raspberry Pi and our educational mission out in North America. Adafruit not only stocks the Raspberry Pi and a whole warehouse-full of compatible electronics; the team also creates some amazing Raspberry Pi add-ons, along with projects and tutorials.

This is Adafruit’s latest Pi project, and it blew our minds.

All the parts you’ll need to create your own point-and-shoot camera using the Raspberry Pi, a Raspberry Pi camera board, and a little touch-screen TFT add-on board that Adafruit have made especially for the Pi, are available from Adafruit (they ship worldwide and are super-friendly). You can also find out how to send your photos to another computer over WiFi, or using Dropbox. As the Adafruit team says:

This isn’t likely to replace your digital camera (or even phone-cam) anytime soon…it’s a simplistic learning exercise and not a polished consumer item…but as the code is open source, you or others might customize it into something your regular camera can’t do.

As always, full instructions on making your own are on the learning section of Adafruit’s website, with a parts list, comprehensive setup instructions, and much more.

Adafruit have been especially prolific this week: we’ll have another project from them to show you in a few days. Thanks to LadyAda, PT, and especially to Phillip Burgess, who engineered this camera project.

Simple Arduino Micro GPS Clock Project #ArduinoMicroMonday

via Arduino Blog

GPS Arduino Micro

Today we start a series of posts in collaboration with Adafruit and focused on Arduino Micro –  every monday follow the hashtag #ArduinoMicroMonday 

————

Jay put together a nice little video of a GPS clock he built using an Arduino Micro, an Adafruit Ultimate GPS module, and an Adafruit 4-Digit 7-Segment LED Display.

I’ve posted a new video of the small GPS clock project I have been working on this past week.  It’s pretty easy to do, and only needs soldering on the GPS and LED units.  You can mount everything to a breadboard, so you don’t need to commit the parts to the project permanently.

Check the video below and his post:

Arduino Micro in collaboration with Adafruit
Arduino Micro board – Based on the technology behind the Leonardo board, its main feature is the very small size.

The Arduino Micro packs all of the power of the Arduino Leonardo in a 48mm x 18mm module (1.9? x 0.7?).

It makes it easier for makers to embed the Arduino technology inside their projects by providing a small and convenient module that can be either used on a breadboard or soldered to a custom designed PCB.

The Micro has been developed in collaboration with Adafruit Industries, one of the leaders of the Maker movement. Adafruit is already developing a series of accessories for the new board that will complement its power and simplicity.

 

Next-generation light painting with NeoPixels and Arduino

via Arduino Blog

led strips

Adafruit’s just released a beautiful tutorial by phillip burgess combining NeoPixel strips,  with the Arduino Uno and a supporting cast of parts to achieve highly refined digital light painting!

If you’re comfortable with wiring, soldering, heat shrink, image conversion, and are  not at your first project, this tutorial is the one for you. As you’ll notice there’s a lot of expensive components used that need careful handiwork but the result is amazing.

Check it out

Pi NoIR infrared camera: now available!

via Raspberry Pi

Pi NoIR, the infrared version of our camera board, is available to purchase for $25 plus tax from today. You’ll find it at all the usual suspects: RS Components, Premier Farnell and their subsidiaries; and at Adafruit. Other stores will be getting stock soon.

Pictures courtesy of Adafruit, who, unlike us, actually have a studio for doing this stuff in – thanks guys!

Back view

What’s that mysterious square of stuff, you ask? I’ll let you know tomorrow.

 

 

Creeptacular face-tracking Halloween portrait

via Raspberry Pi

You’ve got a week to build this portrait, whose eyes follow you around the room, for Halloween.

Adafruit have produced a tutorial, courtesy of Tony DiCola, which uses OpenCV and openFrameworks with your Raspberry Pi and camera board to create a picture of pullulating panic. It’s haunted hardware of horripilating hideousness.

You’ll also find instructions on making your own frame in the tutorial: we recommend making one large enough to drill a hole in, so you can conceal the camera board inside before using this to scare your loved ones. It’s elegant and spooky; plus, you can keep it for the rest of the year and use it for another OpenCV project like the Magic Mirror.

 

Ratsberry Pi – scampering Halloween rats

via Raspberry Pi

A quicky today – I’ve been running from meeting to meeting all day and have only just managed to get some time at my desk now, at half past four in the afternoon. Great meetings, though, and I discovered that Ben “Pi Weekly” Nuttall not only rescues the drowning in his kayak, but also does parkour.

Anyway. This Adafruit project, putting good use to servo motors, red LEDs and a bushel of rubber rodents, is just the ticket for freaking out your mother this Halloween.

Instructions and a parts list are at Adafruit, where I’m pretty sure Mosfet the cat (Mooncake’s favourite Skype buddy) is having a fantastic time with the rubber corpses.

Got a Halloween project you think we might like to feature here? Mail me!

World Maker Faire in NYC was great, see you in Rome!

via Arduino Blog

Banzi and Volunteers

Around 70.000 people attended the 2013 World Maker Faire, NYC this past weekend.

We want to thank all the people vising the Arduino booth (in the Arduino Zone powered by Atmel) and give a special thank to all the amazing volunteers helping us transmitting the passion for making, discovering and tinkering  with Arduino boards.  Temboo team spent the whole weekend with us: it was their first time at MakerFaire and they were astonished at the positive energy of the event.

Take a look at the collection of pictures below to discover also the cool friends coming by, like LadyAda, Phil Torrone, Joey Hudy, Josef Prusa… (if you have pictures to share use the hashtag #arduino or post the link in the comments below)

We’ll be back soon at Maker Faire Rome! Have you booked your ticket yet? Click and book it now with a discount code.

World Maker Faire in NYC was great, see you in Rome!

via Arduino Blog

Banzi and Volunteers

Around 70.000 people attended the 2013 World Maker Faire, NYC this past weekend.

We want to thank all the people vising the Arduino booth (in the Arduino Zone powered by Atmel) and give a special thank to all the amazing volunteers helping us transmitting the passion for making, discovering and tinkering  with Arduino boards.  Temboo team spent the whole weekend with us: it was their first time at MakerFaire and they were astonished at the positive energy of the event.

Take a look at the collection of pictures below to discover also the cool friends coming by, like LadyAda, Phil Torrone, Joey Hudy, Josef Prusa… (if you have pictures to share use the hashtag #arduino or post the link in the comments below)

We’ll be back soon at Maker Faire Rome! Have you booked your ticket yet? Click and book it now with a discount code.

Nicholas, some breadboard and a passcode

via Raspberry Pi

Nicholas Harris is 11 years old, and he’s been learning to code with a Raspberry Pi. He’s set up a website to share his progress, and yesterday I was pointed at a project video he’d made.

Kids like Nicholas are the whole reason we started the Raspberry Pi project: seeing videos like this makes our day, and makes our job feel so worthwhile. Nicholas started with Codecadamy and a desire to control more of the world in Minecraft: Pi Edition (he’s a big fan of Martin O’Hanlon’s Stuff About Code, particularly the Minecraft bits, and Martin has been giving him pointers in his Minecraft work), and he’s now building bigger and bigger projects, learning Python, Ruby and some PHP.

Learning to program as a kid comes with its own set of difficulties. Nicholas’ baby sister threw the entire contents of his hardware kit (which I think was this Adafruit one – let me know if I’ve got that right, Nicholas) into the family LEGO box, and while he was able to retrieve most of the pieces, the light-sensitive photocell never turned up. But Nicholas is a resourceful sort, and found a project in which he could use all the other bits.

So here is Nicholas’ passcode reader. It’s great to see him SSH’ing into the Pi, writing Python, and learning electronics and binary, all in one project. Next stop: soldering!

Thanks Nicholas: and let us know if you do write up a tutorial like you mentioned!

Are you a kid who is learning about computing with the Pi at home? Do you have any projects you’d like to show us? You can get in touch with us via the contact page.