Tag Archives: Announcements

Arduino Science Journal surpasses 100K total downloads!

via Arduino Blog

The Arduino Science Journal is a mobile application that allows anyone to conduct scientific experiments by measuring the surrounding world with sensors, documenting and comparing data, developing and validating hypotheses, and taking notes. The app and all learning materials are free, open source, and available for download on Google Play Store, Apple App Store, and starting from today on Huawei App Gallery.

The Arduino Science Journal encourages students to explore how the world works, record data, document observations, and experiment like a real scientist — all through their mobile device, providing in effect a pocket-sized science lab!

We are happy to announce today that the Arduino Science Journal has surpassed the 100K total downloads since its launch!

Students can choose between dozens of hands-on science experiments, designed by education experts.

All experiments are free and cover a range of different areas, such as light, sound, motion and electricity, and can be used to enrich the learning experience within a variety of subjects such as math, physics, biology, and chemistry.

The Science Journal is aligned with the UK National Curriculum for Science and NGSS in the US.

We want to thank all the students, educators, and our community members that have downloaded the app, empowering the Arduino Education community! 100K times thanks!

Help us build an even bigger worldwide community of scientists! For more information, visit our website

Share this article and download your app today on Google Play Store, Apple App Store, and Huawei App Gallery.

Arduino joins the Open Source Security Foundation

via Arduino Blog

As an open-source project, Arduino has always considered security a top priority: making tools and products easy to use for our community has consistently been as important as making them secure. 

Today, we are excited to announce that Arduino has joined the Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSFF), the collaborative cross-industry effort to secure the open-source ecosystem.

Hosted at the Linux Foundation, the OpenSFF brings together the efforts of the Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) and GitHub’s Open Source Security Coalition and is committed to working both upstream and with existing communities to advance the security of open-source software. The foundation will initially include technical initiatives and working groups that will address vulnerability disclosures, security tooling, security best practices, and the identification of security threats to the open-source project. 

Arduino is proud to become a member of the OpenSFF alongside GitHub, Google, IBM, Facebook, Red Hat, Facebook, Huawei Technologies, and Samsung. Arduino’s membership to the OpenSFF is also part of the Arduino Donation Program, our philanthropic initiative to fund projects and institutions that can make the difference for the worldwide open-source community.

Our aim is to make complex technologies simple to use for everyday people and security out of the box is part of the user experience we strive for. We believe that working with skilled security experts and industries across the globe is crucial in identifying security weaknesses and vulnerabilities, “said Arduino co-founder Massimo Banzi. “We are excited to join the Open Source Security Foundation and we look forward to collaborating with other members to improve the security of any open-source ecosystem.”

Say hello to the new Arduino Oplà IoT Kit: Experience the Internet of Things in your hands!

via Arduino Blog

We’re excited to announce the launch of the Arduino Oplà Kit, the first open programmable IoT platform that allows you to add smart connectivity to the devices around your home or workplace and build custom IoT devices. 

The Oplà IoT Kit contains all the hardware necessary to create eight connected applications, access to an online platform with assembly instructions, and a 12-month subscription to the Arduino Create Maker Plan. This kit is perfect for beginners with basic DIY experience, while more advanced users can leverage it to customize and hack their smart applications and devices, with full control of their data and processes. 

Eight out-of-the-box projects to connect your home or workplace

The projects included in the Oplà IoT Kit enable users to turn everyday appliances into smart appliances, which can be controlled remotely on a mobile phone: 

  • Remote Controlled Lights — Change color, light modes, and switch on/off
  • Personal Weather Station — Record and monitor local weather conditions
  • Home Security Alarm — Detect motion and trigger warnings
  • Solar System Tracker — Retrieve data from planets and moons in the solar system
  • Inventory Control — Track goods in and out
  • Smart Garden — Monitor and manage the environment for your plants
  • Thermostat Control — Smart control for heating and cooling systems
  • Thinking About You — Send messages between the kit and the Arduino IoT Cloud

Create, connect, control. The Internet of Things has never been so easy! 

No soldering is required with the Oplà IoT Kit, which is based on a MKR IoT carrier with an OLED color display, on-board environmental sensors and capacitive touch buttons. The kit also includes a MKR WiFi 1010 board, a circular plastic enclosure and supporting accessories, such as two cables, a motion sensor, a moisture sensor, and a USB cable. 

To build applications, users can rely on the Oplà online platform. Each project includes goals, an intro to the components, step-by-step instructions with illustrations and videos to guide you through assembling the product and building the code. 

Finally, the kit acts as the physical interface of the Arduino IoT Cloud and comes with a 12-month subscription to the Arduino Create Maker Plan, offering unlimited compilation time and extended access to all the features of the Arduino IoT Cloud. 

When creating the Oplà IoT Kit, we wanted to design a platform that would allow anyone to gain a complete experience of what the Internet of Things has to offer around the home or workplace and I really believe we have achieved this. It is a great kit for users to build custom devices and enjoy being creative, no matter your level of experience,” says Arduino CEO Fabio Violante. “With this launch, we take yet another step towards lowering the barrier to entry for IoT development and cannot wait to see the projects created by users embracing connected devices both in their homes and at work.” 

The Oplà IoT Kit is available on the Arduino online store.

New Chair and Trustees of the Raspberry Pi Foundation

via Raspberry Pi

I am delighted to share the news that we have appointed a new Chair and Trustees of the Raspberry Pi Foundation. Between them, they bring an enormous range of experience and expertise to what is already a fantastic Board of Trustees, and I am really looking forward to working with them.

New Chair of the Board of Trustees: John Lazar 

John Lazar has been appointed as the new Chair of the Board of Trustees. John is a software engineer and business leader who is focused on combining technology and entrepreneurship to generate lasting positive impact.

Formerly the Chairman and CEO of Metaswitch Networks, John is now an angel investor, startup mentor, non-executive chairman and board director, including serving as the Chair of What3Words. He is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering and played an active role in developing the programme of study for England’s school Computer Science curriculum. John has also spent many years working on tech-related non-profit initiatives in Africa and co-founded Enza Capital, which invests in early-stage African technology companies that solve pressing problems.

John takes over the Chair from David Cleevely, who has reached the end of his two three-year terms as Trustee and Chair of the Foundation. David has made a huge contribution to the Foundation over that time, and we are delighted that he will continue to be involved in our work as one of the founding members of the Supporters Club.

New Trustees: Amali de Alwis, Charles Leadbeater, Dan Labbad

Alongside John, we are welcoming three new Trustees to the Board of Trustees: 

  • Amali de Alwis is the UK Managing Director of Microsoft for Startups, and is the former CEO of Code First: Girls. She is also a Board member at Ada National College for Digital Skills, sits on the Diversity & Inclusion Board at the Institute of Coding, is an Advisory Board member at the Founders Academy, and was a founding member at Tech Talent Charter.
  • Charles Leadbeater is an independent author, a social entrepreneur, and a leading authority on innovation and creativity. He has advised companies, cities, and governments around the world on innovation strategy and has researched and written extensively on innovation in education. Charles is also a Trustee of the Paul Hamlyn Foundation.
  • Dan Labbad is Chief Executive and Executive Member of the Board of The Crown Estate. He was previously at Lendlease, where he was Chief Executive Officer of Europe from 2009. Dan is also a Director of The Hornery Institute and Ark Schools.

New Member: Suranga Chandratillake 

I am also delighted to announce that we have appointed Suranga Chandratillake as a Member of the Raspberry Pi Foundation. Suranga is a technologist, entrepreneur, and investor.

Suranga Chandratillake

He founded the intelligent search company blinkx and is now a General Partner at Balderton Capital. Suranga is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering and a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader, and he serves on the UK Government’s Council for Science and Technology.

What is a Board of Trustees anyway? 

As a charity, the Raspberry Pi Foundation is governed by a Board of Trustees that is ultimately responsible for what we do and how we are run. It is the Trustees’ job to make sure that we are focused on our mission, which for us means helping more people learn about computing, computer science, and related subjects. The Trustees also have all the usual responsibilities of company directors, including making sure that we use our resources effectively. As Chief Executive, I am accountable to the Board of Trustees. 

We’ve always been fortunate to attract the most amazing people to serve as Trustees and, as volunteers, they are incredibly generous with their time, sharing their expertise and experience on a wide range of issues. They are an important part of the team. Trustees serve for up to two terms of three years so that we always have fresh views and experience to draw on.

How do you appoint Trustees? 

Appointments to the Board of Trustees follow open recruitment and selection processes that are overseen by the Foundation’s Nominations Committee, supported by independent external advisers. Our aim is to appoint Trustees who bring different backgrounds, perspectives, and lived experience, as well as a range of skills. As with all appointments, we consider diversity at every aspect of the recruitment and selection processes.

Formally, Trustees are elected by the Foundation’s Members at our Annual General Meeting. This year’s AGM took place last week on Zoom. Members are also volunteers, and they play an important role in holding the Board of Trustees to account, helping to shape our strategy, and acting as advocates for our mission.

You can see the full list of Trustees and Members on our website.

The post New Chair and Trustees of the Raspberry Pi Foundation appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

How can we help? New Help Center makes it easier than ever to enjoy Arduino

via Arduino Blog

The Arduino Customer support team is excited to announce the final release of the Arduino Help Center. A place where you can find answers to your questions and lots of useful troubleshooting articles to help you enjoy and get the most out of the Arduino experience.  

With the active Arduino community finding ever more creative ways to use an Arduino, building a purposeful help center with customers at heart has been a challenge that we enjoyed taking. The design, development and customer support teams have been studying all the different contact points in our ecosystem to gather more information and insights on how users interact with Arduino; providing a solid foundation to build a Help Center with useful sections and friendly navigation.

One primary aim of putting together the Help Center was to specifically make it easier for new Arduino users to access all the information that can help them to get the most out of their Arduino experience. This new solution expands the channels we use to support our customers, and rest assured we are still here to help if you can’t find the answer you’re looking for — plus there is the Arduino forum with millions of community members out there willing to share their tips. Given the constantly active nature of the Arduino community, we will continue to add new articles on a monthly basis with the most topical and useful solutions.

How  to use the new Arduino Help Center?

The Arduino Help Center is always available — simply click ‘Help’ in the bottom right of your screen.

Once there you will find 4 main sections:

  • Search bar: The search will immediately find any relevant article within the Help Center. For instance, if you are looking for information about the ‘MKR NB 1500’,  simply type the name of the board and you will have access to all the available articles for this board.
  • Articles: For each of navigation the articles have divided into 6 categories:
    • Hardware Products: boards and shields (by family)
    • Software: IDE and Libraries. 
    • Arduino Create Apps: Web editor, Arduino IoT cloud, Arduino Sim card and linux devices.
    • Education: All our educational offers.
    • Store Support: orders, shipping and payments.
    • About Arduino:  Using your Arduino account, Arduino logos and trademark.
  • Tutorials: Useful tutorials including ‘getting started’ and examples to explore.
  • Additional Support: Other ways to interact with the Arduino Customer support and the Arduino Community  (The Arduino Forum, our contact us forms and our discord server).

What is next?

Our customers and community are fundamental for our evolution and the Help Center is just the first move towards a better customer experience. Therefore we want to hear from all of you and for now we want to understand how relevant is every article and if it helped you solve your question. Just by answering the questions at the end of the article, it helps us to produce better and more accurate explanations. Also, don’t hesitate on suggesting new articles or fixes through our contact us form. 

Get ready to Explore IoT with Arduino Education

via Arduino Blog

This week we are launching our  Arduino Explore IoT Kit, which allows high school and college students to take their first steps in building connected devices. Educators can make a complex subject simple – explore the Internet of Things right now with Arduino Education. 

Aimed at the beginner,  there is a complete set of easy to follow online projects providing students with a  gateway into the digital world of connected objects and how people work together.

The kit comes complete with a complimentary 12 months subscription to the Arduino Create Maker plan, meaning it’s quicker and easier than ever to learn how to monitor, manage and control devices using the cloud – with the new Arduino IoT Cloud Remote app you can now do this ‘on the go’ via your mobile.

We recently spoke to Sara Willner-Giwerc, (a PhD candidate at Tufts University in Boston, Massachusetts, US) about her amazing work using the Internet of Things in education – helping to show just how useful the new Explore IoT Kit will be.

“By leveraging the Internet of Things, students are able to build more powerful systems that are no longer limited to only the resources they physically possess. This technological capability presents a cool opportunity for students to experience how they can be more powerful when they connect and collaborate with others than they can be on their own. “

“Especially now, in this time of social distancing and remote learning, the ability to communicate with devices that aren’t physically near us has become even more essential than it was previously. I’m really excited about the idea of using IoT to help students think about designing for more global systems.” 

Read the full article about Sara here

Here’s what a student had to say about the new Explore IoT Kit, when he got the chance to try out an advanced version:

“I would describe it as a very beginner-friendly way to get started with the Internet of Things, and a kit that you will be able to expand upon with your own ideas and components.”

“…the getting started section got me really excited to actually get started because it inspired all these thought streams of what I could potentially create with the kit.” Oliver Kempel – Danish High School Student 

The kit features 10 activities for students to develop a complete understanding of IoT:

  • Using the IoT Cloud and connected devices: Control physical objects, such as a displays or lights, remotely with the Arduino IoT Cloud
  • Collecting, processing, and storing data: Store data locally, wirelessly, and remotely for analysis and backup
  • Graphing and visualizing data and understanding its meaning: Use different tools and techniques to graph data and interpret the information collected
  • Serial communication, APIs, JSON, and web servers: Learn the essentials of how APIs (application programming interfaces) work, how to access remote web servers, and how to store the incoming data in JSON objects to create devices that can access all sorts of data from all over the world, and display it locally
  • Network security considerations: Understand how software developers protect devices and information from unauthorized access
  • Different sensors and how to use them: Investigate the environment using temperature, humidity, and light sensors, collect data about movement using an accelerometer, pressure, and motion sensors, take care of your plants by following the data from moisture and light sensors
  • Actuators and how to use them: Use lights, sound, display, and relays: electronic components used to activate high power devices, to visualize data, and control external devices

The Explore IoT Kit is available to buy now from our Education Partners locally or from the Arduino Store for only €99 / $114.

N.B. In addition to the Explore IoT Kit,  a second kit the “Oplà IoT Kit” will also be coming soon, targeting makers and professionals alike who are after an out-of-the-box IoT experience. The Oplà IoT Kit will enable users to instantly add connectivity to devices for the home and workplace – available to buy from early October onwards.