Tag Archives: app note

App note: Output filter caps for mission critical applications

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A great guide from AVX on output capacitor types and their specific uses based on ESR, ESL and temperature properties. Link here (PDF)

This document discusses the effect of capacitors on output power quality. It evaluates and provides a comparison of different capacitor technologies, their high reliability qualification availability from COTS+ to space level, and their impact on the output filtering capabilities in switching power supplies primarily used for mission critical applications.

App note: Application of leaded resistors in energy meters

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App note from Vishay about energy meter circuits and the use of leaded resistors on them. Link here (PDF)

An electric meter or energy meter is a device that measures the amount of electrical energy supplied to a residence or business. It is also known as (k)Wh meter. The main unit of measurement in the electricity meter is the kilowatt-hour which is equal to the amount of energy used by a load of one kW over a period of one hour.

App note: Overcurrent protection with Thin Film resistors technology

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A technical note about Thin Film fuses from Vishay. Link here (PDF)

Thin film technology is an established technology for high-grade passive components, which has been proved and refined over decades. Its advantages in terms of accuracy, repeatability and stability are appreciated in mass production for billions of thin film resistors every year. Chip fuses produced in thin film technology now deliver similarly predictable properties in terms of the stability and repeatability of the fusing characteristic. With this proven technology embodied in next-generation safety devices for overcurrent protection, power electronics designers can achieve higher levels of safety and performance in new product designs.

App note: Interfacing to analog switches: Driving the control input of an analog switch with 1.8 V or lower − Is it safe?

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ON Semiconductor’s analog switches let you drive with an input control voltage lower than Vcc. Link here (PDF)

Analog switches are everywhere today. Due to their small size and low current consumption, they are popular in portable devices where they are effective in a variety of subsystems including audio and data communications, port connections, and even test. They can be used to facilitate signal routing, allow multiple data types to share an interface connector, or permit temporary access to internal processors during manufacturing. Analog switches are often used to give portable system designers a convenient method of increasing their features or accessibility without duplicating any circuitry. Understanding the key specifications and tradeoffs can make the difference between a temporary fix and a truly optimized solution.

App note: Consideration of self-pollution reduction for electronic systems

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App note from ON Semiconductors discussing how locally generated EMI affects its own system and how to prevent it. Link here (PDF)

This application note will address the problem of Electro Magnetic Interference (EMI) self pollution in which one part of an electrical systems such as cell phones and consumer electrical products emit radiation that interferes with the operation of other parts of the system.

App note: Active capacitor discharge circuit considerations for FPGAs

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Power down sequencing and discharging on FPGAs app note from Diodes Incorporated. Link here (PDF)

FPGA’s need the different power rails to be powered up and down in a defined sequence. For power down, each sequenced rail needs to be fully off before the next rail is turned off. With large high speed and high functionality FPGA’s, the power rails have large bulk capacitors to be discharged quickly and safely within a total time of 100ms and up to 10 rails each to be discharged within 10ms.

This application note shows a methodology and considerations for safe open ended shutdown to be controlled by a power sequencing circuit and using correctly chosen MOSFET to discharge the capacitor bank.