Tag Archives: app note

App note: Performance of noise canceller of LC823450

via Dangerous Prototypes

an_on_AND9722-D

Audio Noise cancelling LC823450 from ON Semiconductor. Link here (PDF)

This application note describes the performance of Noise Canceller of LC823450 Series. The customer can improve of audio characteristics by using this canceller. Its function can be used for various products such as Wireless headset, Earbads, Wireless speaker or IC−recoder.

App note: Performance of echo canceller of LC823450

via Dangerous Prototypes

an_on_AND9721-D

Audio application echo canceller LC823450 from ON Semiconductor. Link here (PDF)

This application note describes the performance of Echo canceller of LC823450 Series. The customer can improve the sound quality of hands free communication by using this canceller. Its function can be used for various products such as Wireless headset. Earbads or other voice communication products.

App note: eFuse load current measurement

via Dangerous Prototypes

an_on_AND9685-D

App note from ON Semiconductor on eFuse current measurement. Link here (PDF)

This application note describes the load current measurement solution for the eFuses which do not provide load current monitoring feature. Since almost all of the eFuses provide adjustable current limit functionality by utilizing an external current limiting resistor between “ILIM” and “SRC” pins, it is possible to connect a current sense amplifier across that resistor and measure the voltage drop across it which would be proportional to the load current. This method mainly requires a current sense amplifier and allows user to measure the system load current without introducing any additional resistance in series with the load path.

App note: Sub-1 V current sensing with the TS1001, A 0.8 V, 0.6 µA OP-AMP

via Dangerous Prototypes

an_silabs_an833

Another TS1001 op-amp application from Silicon Labs on sensing nano currents. Link here (PDF)

Current-sense amplifiers can monitor battery or solar cell currents, and are useful to estimate power capacity and remaining life. However, if the battery or solar source is a single cell, it’s difficult to find a low voltage solution that works below 1V and draws just microamps. A new class of nanopower analog ICs, namely the TS1001 0.8 V/0.6 µA op amp, makes a sub-1 V supply current sense amplifier possible. This discrete circuit operates from as low as 0.8 V and draws 860 nA at no load while providing a 0–500 mV output for measured currents of 0–100 mA, though the scale can be adjusted by changing the values of a few resistors. With its extremely low power, the circuit can simply remain “always on,” providing a continuously monitored, averaged indication of current which can subsequently be read periodically by a microcontroller, without causing too much current drain in the battery.

App note: A microwatt charge pump boosts 1 V to 1.8 V at 90% efficiency, providing “Always On” standby power for microcontrollers

via Dangerous Prototypes

an_silabs_an832

Interesting app note from Silicon Labs on high efficiency charge pump utilizing their nanopower TS1001 op amp. Link here (PDF)

Boosting the output voltage of common alkaline button-cells to at least 1.8 V needed by microcontrollers provides an “always on” standby power source sufficient for low-power oscillator interrupt/sleep state operation. Two ultralow power op amps are used in a charge pump configuration to double an input voltage, creating an output voltage of approximately 2x the input voltage. Output currents up to 100 µA are available at 90% efficiency; even load currents as low as 10 µA achieve 80% efficiency, beating commercially available charge pump ICs and inductorbased boost regulators.

App note: High-frequency automotive power supplies

via Dangerous Prototypes

an_maxim_AN3893

Switching power supply used in automotive electronics app note from Maxim Integrated. Link here (PDF)

The combination of high switching frequency and high-voltage capability is difficult to achieve in IC design. You can, however, design an automotive power supply that operates with high frequency if you protect it from temporary high-voltage conditions. High-frequency operation is becoming important as more and more electronic functions are integrated into the modern automobile. This article discusses several ways to protect low-voltage electronic circuits from the harsh effects of the automotive electrical environment. Also included are the results of laboratory tests for noise immunity.