Tag Archives: ARM

BlackMagicProbe SMDprutser style

via Dangerous Prototypes

BlackMagicProbe

Sjaak has published a new build:

When you get started on ARM microcontrollers things are very overwhelming at first… After coping with the first few hurdles like installing a toolchain and IDE, the next part should be getting a tool to program the chip. Many vendors have some kind of bootloader burned in the chip, which can’t be altered. Some manufacturers use serial, some use USB (mass-storage, DFU or HID). Unfortunately every vendor has it own implementation and they aren’t compatible with each other and may require special hardware. This can make it hard(er) for you to change between vendors. Another downside is your code can only be debugged by ‘printf” and not ‘realtime’.

More details at smdprutser.nl.

 

Your Arm Is The Ideal Controller

via hardware – Hackaday

With interest and accessibility to both wearable tech and virtual reality approaching an all-time high, three students from Cornell University — [Daryl Sew, Emma Wang, and Zachary Zimmerman] — seek to turn your body into the perfect controller.

That is the end goal, at least. Their prototype consists of three Kionix tri-axis accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer sensors (at the hand, elbow, and shoulder) to trace the arm’s movement. Relying on a PC to do most of the computational heavy lifting, a PIC32 in a t-shirt canister — hey, it’s a prototype! — receives data from the three joint positions, transmitting them to said PC via serial, which renders a useable 3D model in a virtual environment. After a brief calibration, the setup tracks the arm movement with only a little drift in readings over a few minutes.

[Sew, Wang and Zimmerman] see their project as an easy-to-implement alternative to the high-end systems currently extant in the gaming, virtual reality, fitness and medical industries. We can’t wait ’till we can combine this with tracking individual fingers.

If seeing this project has warmed you up to the topic of rapid prototyping, check out [Ben Krasnow’s] advice on the topic from his SuperCon talk. We’d also like to point out [Bodo Hoenen’s]  talk about a system that uses electromyography to pick up the movement of the muscles in the arm.


Filed under: hardware, Virtual Reality

Debugging ARM Cortex-M0+ HardFaults

via Dangerous Prototypes

next-step-will-be-a-hard-fault

Erich Styger has written an article on debugging a hard fault on an ARM Cortex-M0+ device:

To me, one of the most frustrating things working with ARM Cortex-M cores are the hard fault exceptions. I have lost several hours this week debugging and tracking an instance of a hard fault on an ARM Cortex-M0+ device.

More details at MCU on Eclipse homepage.

JeeNode Zero

via Dangerous Prototypes

pics-DSC_5619-600

JeeLabs has been working on a new board called JeeNode Zero:

Enter the STM32, the 32-bit ARM series from STMicroelectronics which has been around for several years, with new chip releases at a breathtaking pace. While most of the more advanced chips are only available in 64-, 100-, or even 144-pin packages, there is also an active line of smaller chips in 20- and 32-pin versions. For these, the STM32L series is particularly interesting from a low-power standpoint, with its “stop” and “standby” mode power consumption in the single microamp range, sometimes even lower.
And so the idea was born to try and design a new entry for the JeeNode family, which would again combine a µC with a low-end radio, i.e. the RFM69 successor of the RFM12.
Since there are no DIP versions of the STM32’s, the size can be made considerably smaller than the ATmega-based JeeNode v6. It all ended up being a unit of about 20×40 mm, with all the components on one side, and a large “main header” to support solderless breadboards

Project info at Jeelabs homepage.

JeeNode Zero

via Dangerous Prototypes

pics-DSC_5619-600

JeeLabs has been working on a new board called JeeNode Zero:

Enter the STM32, the 32-bit ARM series from STMicroelectronics which has been around for several years, with new chip releases at a breathtaking pace. While most of the more advanced chips are only available in 64-, 100-, or even 144-pin packages, there is also an active line of smaller chips in 20- and 32-pin versions. For these, the STM32L series is particularly interesting from a low-power standpoint, with its “stop” and “standby” mode power consumption in the single microamp range, sometimes even lower.
And so the idea was born to try and design a new entry for the JeeNode family, which would again combine a µC with a low-end radio, i.e. the RFM69 successor of the RFM12.
Since there are no DIP versions of the STM32’s, the size can be made considerably smaller than the ATmega-based JeeNode v6. It all ended up being a unit of about 20×40 mm, with all the components on one side, and a large “main header” to support solderless breadboards

Project info at Jeelabs homepage.

Body Cardio Weighing Scale Teardown

via hardware – Hackaday

If you weigh yourself by standing on a bathroom scale, not liking the result, then balancing towards one corner to knock a few pounds off the dial, you are stuck in a previous century. Modern bathroom scales have not only moved from the mechanical to the electronic, they also gather body composition measurements and pack significant computing power.

Yet they’re a piece of domestic electronics that sits in our bathroom and rarely comes under scrutiny. How do they work, and what do they contain? The team at November Five tore down a top-of-the-range Withings Body Cardio scale to find out.

After a struggle with double-sided sticky pads, the scale revealed its secrets: a simple yet accomplished device. There are four load cells and the electrodes for the body measurement, and the PCB. On the board is a 120 MHz ARM Cortex M4 microcontroller, a wireless chipset, battery management, and the analogue measurement chipset. This last is particularly interesting, a Texas Instruments AFE4300, a specialised analogue front-end for this application. It’s a chip most of us will never use, but as always an obscure datasheet is worth a read.

The rather pretty fractal antenna.
The rather pretty fractal antenna.

Finally, the wireless antenna is not the normal simple angular trace you’ll be used to from the likes of ESP8266 boards, but an organic squiggle. It’s a fractal antenna, presumably designed to present a carefully calculated bandwidth to the chipset. A nice touch, though one the consumer will never be aware of.

We’ve shown you quite a few bathroom scales over the years. There was this wisecracking Raspberry Pi scale, this scale reverse engineered to gather weight data, and this one laid bare for use as a controller.


Filed under: ARM, hardware