Tag Archives: ARM

Another Arduino Compatible? This Time, It’s A Sony

via hardware – Hackaday

When it comes to microcontroller development boards, we have a plethora of choices at our disposal. Each has its strengths and weaknesses, be they associated with its support and community, its interface capabilities, or its choice of processor family. Most boards you’ll find in our communities come from niche manufacturers, or at least from manufacturers who started as such. Just occasionally though along comes one whose manufacturer you will have heard of, ever whose manufacturer the Man in the Street will have heard of.

Which brings us neatly to today’s story, the quiet announcement from Sony, of a new microcontroller development board called the Spritzer. This is Arduino compatible in both physical footprint and IDE, is intended for IoT applications, and packs GPS, an audio codec, and an ARM Cortex M4 at 156 MHz. There is a Japanese page with a little more detail (Google Translate link), on which they talk about applications including audio beam forming with up to eight microphones, and a camera interface. 

The board is due to be available sometime early next year, and while it looks as though it will be an interesting device we’d sound a note of caution to Sony. It is not good enough to have an amazing piece of hardware; the software and community support must be more than just make-believe. If they can crack that then they might just have a winner on their hands, if they fail to make any effort then they will inevitably follow Intel into the graveyard of also-ran boards.

Thanks [Chris] for the tip.


Filed under: hardware

Using Python to store data from many BLE devices

via Dangerous Prototypes

raspberry-pi-with-python-controlling-a-set-of-hexiwear-ble-devices

Erich Styger has written an article describing a technique he used to collect and store data from several BLE devices with Raspberry Pi and Python scripting:

BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy) sensor devices like the Hexiwear are great, but they cannot store a large amount of data. For a research project I have to collect data from many BLE devices for later processing. What I’m using is a Python script running on the Raspberry Pi which collects the data and stores it on a file

More details at mcuoneclipse.com.

MCUXpresso IDE tutorial series

via Dangerous Prototypes

blinky-on-lpc800-dip

Erich Styger has made a series of tutorial blog posts on using the new NXP MCUXpresso IDE.

Published so far are:

  • MCUXpresso IDE: Unified Eclipse IDE for NXPs ARM Cortex-M Microcontrollers
  • MCUXpresso IDE: S-Record, Intel Hex and Binary Files
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Adding the Eclipse Marketplace Client
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Importing Kinetis Design Studio Projects
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Installing Processor Expert into Eclipse Neon
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Terminate and Disconnect a Debug Session
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Blinky the NXP LPC800-DIP Board

More details at mcuoneclipse.com.

Modifying the Teensy 3.5 and 3.6 for ARM SWD debugging

via Dangerous Prototypes

teensy-3-6

Erich Styger @ mcuoneclipse.com writes:

Looking for a small, inexpensive ($25-30) ARM development board (say 120-180 MHz ARM Cortex-M4 with FPU, 512kB-1MB of FLASH and 256 KByte of RAM? Then have a look at the Teensy 3.5 and Teensy 3.6 by PJRC/Paul Stoffregen
The only problem? it is not possible to debug it :-(. At least not in the traditional sense. This article is about how to change the board to use it with any normal SWD debugging tool e.g. Eclipse and the Segger J-Link :-).

More details at MCU on Eclipse homepage.

PogoPlug Hacking: A Step by Step Guide to Owning The Device

via hardware – Hackaday

[Films By Kris Hardware] has started quite an interesting YouTube series on hacking and owning a PogoPlug Mobile v4. While this has been done many times in the past, he gives a great step by step tutorial. The series so far is quite impressive, going into great detail on how to gain root access to the device through serial a serial connection.

PogoPlugs are remote-access devices sporting ARM processor running at 800 MHz, which is supported by the Linux Kernel.  The version in question (PogoPlug Mobile v4) have been re-purposed in the past for things like an inexpensive PBX, an OpenWrt router and even a squeezebox replacement. Even if you don’t have a PogoPlug, this could be a great introduction to hacking any Linux-based consumer device.

So far, we’re at part three of what will be an eight-part series, so there’s going to be more to learn if you follow along. His videos have already covered how to connect via a serial port to the device, how to send commands, set the device up, and stop it calling home. This will enable the budding hacker to make the PogoPlug do their bidding. In this age of the cheap single-board Linux computer, hacking this type of device may be going out of style, but the skills you learn here probably won’t any time soon.


Filed under: hardware, how-to

MQTT with lwip and NXP FRDM-K64F Board

via Dangerous Prototypes

lwip-ping-example

Erich Styger from MCU on Eclipse writes, “In this article I show the basic steps to get MQTT running on the NXP FRDM-K64F board using MCUXpresso IDE, lwip and MQTT. lwip ois a small and open source TCP/IP stack which is widely used. To keep things very simple in this first post, I’m using it in bare-metal (no RTOS) mode with no encryption/security. The principle applies to any IDE/toolchain, as long there is a lwip port available for your board and IDE/toolchain. I’m using the MCUXpresso IDE as it nicely integrates with the MCUXpresso SDK which includes a lwip port for the FRDM-K64F.”

More details at MCU on Eclipse homepage.