Tag Archives: ARM

Commodore 64 for STM32F429 Discovery board

via Dangerous Prototypes

Dave built a Commodore 64 emulator for STM32F429 Discovery board:

Yeah, the LCD is tiny at 2.4″, and the emulation runs about 15% slower than an NTSC C64. But it’s running on a small embedded board that’s available for under $30 US (DigiKey, Mouser, …) including mounted LCD display and USB OTG jack. Just add keyboard, OTG USB adapter, and power supply.
This is a port of my portable C64/6502 emulator for terminal console, which was a port of my Commodore/6502 emulator for Windows Console. But this time, I dropped the console part, and went for real video (LCD) and USB keyboard support. Hello PETSCII!

See the full post on Tech with Dave blog.

Low cost high accuracy STM32 FFT LCR meter

via Dangerous Prototypes

Adil Malik made a low cost FFT LCR meter with an STM32 MCU:

The approach I took was a mixed signal one where a capable analog front end would be paired up with a beefy DSP processor to compute the Impedance. Most importantly, in this scheme, the DSP is responsible for discriminating the phase between the sampled voltage and current waveforms; this approach is preferred because it leads to good accuracy and calibration stability.

See the full post on his blog.

LoRa module in DIL form

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lora-breakout-600

Mare writes:

Murata produces LoRa module CMWX1ZZABZ-xxx based on SX1276 transceiver and STM32L072CZ microcontroller. The soldering of the LGA module is not very hobby-friendly. I constructed small breakout PCB for this module with additional buck/boost switcher and place for SMA connector. The transceiver features the LoRa®long-range modem, providing ultra-long-range spread spectrum communication and high interference immunity, minimizing current consumption. Since CMWX1ZZABZ-091 is an “open” module, it is possible to access all STM32L072 peripherals such as ADC, 16-bit timer, LP-UART, I2C, SPI and USB 2.0 FS (supporting BCD and LPM), which are not used internally by SX1276.

More details on Mare & Gal Electronics site. Project files are available at Github.

STM32F103 vs GD32F103 round 2: Blink a LED

via Dangerous Prototypes

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A follow-up to the STM32F103 vs GD32F103 round 1- Solderability post, Sjaak writes:

The defacto ‘hello world’ for microcontrollers is blink a LED at a steady rate. This is exactly what I’m going to do today. I made a small 5×5 development board, soldered it up and started programming. In this first example we not gonna use fancy IRQs or timers to blink at a steady rate, but we insert NOPsas delay. This would give an idea of the RAW performance of the chip. The used code is simple; set up the maximum available clock available and then toggle RA0 for ever.

More details at smdprutser.nl.

STM32F103 vs GD32F103

via Dangerous Prototypes

stm32vsgd32

Sjaak wrote about a Chinese ARM chip compared to a ST ARM chip:

Most of us do know the ST line of ARM chips called STM32. They come in multiple flavours and the STM32F103 is one of the most common entry level family of chips. They are called by ST as mainstream. They are a full featured 32 bit ARM Cortex M3 chip running at max. 72MHz with all the requisite peripherals like ADC, DAC, USB, CAN, I2C, I2S, SPI, SDIO, PWM, RTC, interrupts and various timers. Lets zoom into the STM32F103C8 chip (which seems the be the go-to choice of the Chinese el-cheapo development breakout boards)

See the full post at smdprutser.nl.

Yet another ARM development tutorial

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ARM development tutorial at smdprutser.nl:

It has been a while since I wrote about ARM development. I recently made a Black Magic Probe (BMP) clone which acts different then the original. The BMP can source power to the target, but on my version control signal is inverted. Not a big deal, but can give unintentional results and has to be fixed. Just for my own memory I wrote down all the steps involved in setting it up and shared it in order to be useful for others.

See the full post on smdprutser blog.