Tag Archives: ARM

Using Python to store data from many BLE devices

via Dangerous Prototypes

raspberry-pi-with-python-controlling-a-set-of-hexiwear-ble-devices

Erich Styger has written an article describing a technique he used to collect and store data from several BLE devices with Raspberry Pi and Python scripting:

BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy) sensor devices like the Hexiwear are great, but they cannot store a large amount of data. For a research project I have to collect data from many BLE devices for later processing. What I’m using is a Python script running on the Raspberry Pi which collects the data and stores it on a file

More details at mcuoneclipse.com.

MCUXpresso IDE tutorial series

via Dangerous Prototypes

blinky-on-lpc800-dip

Erich Styger has made a series of tutorial blog posts on using the new NXP MCUXpresso IDE.

Published so far are:

  • MCUXpresso IDE: Unified Eclipse IDE for NXPs ARM Cortex-M Microcontrollers
  • MCUXpresso IDE: S-Record, Intel Hex and Binary Files
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Adding the Eclipse Marketplace Client
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Importing Kinetis Design Studio Projects
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Installing Processor Expert into Eclipse Neon
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Terminate and Disconnect a Debug Session
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Blinky the NXP LPC800-DIP Board

More details at mcuoneclipse.com.

Modifying the Teensy 3.5 and 3.6 for ARM SWD debugging

via Dangerous Prototypes

teensy-3-6

Erich Styger @ mcuoneclipse.com writes:

Looking for a small, inexpensive ($25-30) ARM development board (say 120-180 MHz ARM Cortex-M4 with FPU, 512kB-1MB of FLASH and 256 KByte of RAM? Then have a look at the Teensy 3.5 and Teensy 3.6 by PJRC/Paul Stoffregen
The only problem? it is not possible to debug it :-(. At least not in the traditional sense. This article is about how to change the board to use it with any normal SWD debugging tool e.g. Eclipse and the Segger J-Link :-).

More details at MCU on Eclipse homepage.

PogoPlug Hacking: A Step by Step Guide to Owning The Device

via hardware – Hackaday

[Films By Kris Hardware] has started quite an interesting YouTube series on hacking and owning a PogoPlug Mobile v4. While this has been done many times in the past, he gives a great step by step tutorial. The series so far is quite impressive, going into great detail on how to gain root access to the device through serial a serial connection.

PogoPlugs are remote-access devices sporting ARM processor running at 800 MHz, which is supported by the Linux Kernel.  The version in question (PogoPlug Mobile v4) have been re-purposed in the past for things like an inexpensive PBX, an OpenWrt router and even a squeezebox replacement. Even if you don’t have a PogoPlug, this could be a great introduction to hacking any Linux-based consumer device.

So far, we’re at part three of what will be an eight-part series, so there’s going to be more to learn if you follow along. His videos have already covered how to connect via a serial port to the device, how to send commands, set the device up, and stop it calling home. This will enable the budding hacker to make the PogoPlug do their bidding. In this age of the cheap single-board Linux computer, hacking this type of device may be going out of style, but the skills you learn here probably won’t any time soon.


Filed under: hardware, how-to

MQTT with lwip and NXP FRDM-K64F Board

via Dangerous Prototypes

lwip-ping-example

Erich Styger from MCU on Eclipse writes, “In this article I show the basic steps to get MQTT running on the NXP FRDM-K64F board using MCUXpresso IDE, lwip and MQTT. lwip ois a small and open source TCP/IP stack which is widely used. To keep things very simple in this first post, I’m using it in bare-metal (no RTOS) mode with no encryption/security. The principle applies to any IDE/toolchain, as long there is a lwip port available for your board and IDE/toolchain. I’m using the MCUXpresso IDE as it nicely integrates with the MCUXpresso SDK which includes a lwip port for the FRDM-K64F.”

More details at MCU on Eclipse homepage.

Tutorial: Using Eclipse with NXP MCUXpresso SDK v2 and processor expert

via Dangerous Prototypes

sdkv2-project-with-processor-expert

Erich Styger from MCU on Eclipse writes:

To me, software and tools are by far more important than the microcontroller. Because the silicon is a ‘one time kind of thing’, where the software has to be maintained and working over a longer time. And at least my software usually needs to be ported to a new device, so portability and available software and tools are critical to me.

The combination of MCUXpresso SDK (formerly Kinetis SDK) and Processor Expert is unfortunately not supported by NXP. But I have found a way to get them work together in a nice way, and this article is about making that combination possible :-).

More details at MCU on Eclipse homepage.