Tag Archives: ARM

PogoPlug Hacking: A Step by Step Guide to Owning The Device

via hardware – Hackaday

[Films By Kris Hardware] has started quite an interesting YouTube series on hacking and owning a PogoPlug Mobile v4. While this has been done many times in the past, he gives a great step by step tutorial. The series so far is quite impressive, going into great detail on how to gain root access to the device through serial a serial connection.

PogoPlugs are remote-access devices sporting ARM processor running at 800 MHz, which is supported by the Linux Kernel.  The version in question (PogoPlug Mobile v4) have been re-purposed in the past for things like an inexpensive PBX, an OpenWrt router and even a squeezebox replacement. Even if you don’t have a PogoPlug, this could be a great introduction to hacking any Linux-based consumer device.

So far, we’re at part three of what will be an eight-part series, so there’s going to be more to learn if you follow along. His videos have already covered how to connect via a serial port to the device, how to send commands, set the device up, and stop it calling home. This will enable the budding hacker to make the PogoPlug do their bidding. In this age of the cheap single-board Linux computer, hacking this type of device may be going out of style, but the skills you learn here probably won’t any time soon.


Filed under: hardware, how-to

MQTT with lwip and NXP FRDM-K64F Board

via Dangerous Prototypes

lwip-ping-example

Erich Styger from MCU on Eclipse writes, “In this article I show the basic steps to get MQTT running on the NXP FRDM-K64F board using MCUXpresso IDE, lwip and MQTT. lwip ois a small and open source TCP/IP stack which is widely used. To keep things very simple in this first post, I’m using it in bare-metal (no RTOS) mode with no encryption/security. The principle applies to any IDE/toolchain, as long there is a lwip port available for your board and IDE/toolchain. I’m using the MCUXpresso IDE as it nicely integrates with the MCUXpresso SDK which includes a lwip port for the FRDM-K64F.”

More details at MCU on Eclipse homepage.

Tutorial: Using Eclipse with NXP MCUXpresso SDK v2 and processor expert

via Dangerous Prototypes

sdkv2-project-with-processor-expert

Erich Styger from MCU on Eclipse writes:

To me, software and tools are by far more important than the microcontroller. Because the silicon is a ‘one time kind of thing’, where the software has to be maintained and working over a longer time. And at least my software usually needs to be ported to a new device, so portability and available software and tools are critical to me.

The combination of MCUXpresso SDK (formerly Kinetis SDK) and Processor Expert is unfortunately not supported by NXP. But I have found a way to get them work together in a nice way, and this article is about making that combination possible :-).

More details at MCU on Eclipse homepage.

Robot Arm From Recyclables

via hardware – Hackaday

A robot assistant would make the lives of many much easier. Luckily, it’s possible to make one of your own with few fancy materials. The [circuito.io] team demonstrates this by building a robot arm out of recyclables!

With the exception of the electronics — an Arduino, a trio of servo motors, and a joystick — the arm is made almost completely out of salvaged recyclables: scrap wood, a plastic bottle, bits of plastic string and a spring. Oh, and — demonstrating yet another use for those multi-talented tubers — a potato acts as a counterweight.

Instead of using screws or glue, these hackers used string made from a plastic bottle as a form of heat shrink wrap to bind the parts of the arm together. The gripper has only one pivoting claw for greater strength, and the spring snaps it open once released. Behold: your tea-bag dunking assistant.


Code for the project is available to download from their site. Given this straightforward tutorial, it’s hard to find a reason NOT to embark on building your first robot arm — if you haven’t already begun.

We at Hackaday love seeing projects that strive to reuse materials in inventive ways. That said, you needn’t rely on a shiny new Arduino for this robot arm. If you have an aging palm pilot kicking around, that will also do the trick.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, hardware, robots hacks

Cheep Mod II – a low cost platform for Euro-Rack digital audio

via Dangerous Prototypes

pics-cheep2-600

Eric Brombaugh writes, “This is a small 6HP Euro-Rack format module with 3 CV inputs, 3 pots, Digital (Sync) input, 16-bit stereo audio outputs. It’s a slight modification of the Cheep Mod I did earlier, but with a slightly more advanced MCU that provides I2S output and has more on-chip flash. One of the goals here was to test out the audio characteristics of one of the low-cost I2S DACs that are cropping up.”

Project info at Eric Brombaugh’s blog.

 

BlackMagicProbe SMDprutser style

via Dangerous Prototypes

BlackMagicProbe

Sjaak has published a new build:

When you get started on ARM microcontrollers things are very overwhelming at first… After coping with the first few hurdles like installing a toolchain and IDE, the next part should be getting a tool to program the chip. Many vendors have some kind of bootloader burned in the chip, which can’t be altered. Some manufacturers use serial, some use USB (mass-storage, DFU or HID). Unfortunately every vendor has it own implementation and they aren’t compatible with each other and may require special hardware. This can make it hard(er) for you to change between vendors. Another downside is your code can only be debugged by ‘printf” and not ‘realtime’.

More details at smdprutser.nl.