Tag Archives: art

Autocomplete poetry

via Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi integrated into the world of art. I hadn’t come across much of this before, and I like it a lot. As a self-proclaimed ‘artist of stuff’, it’s always exciting to see something arty that calls to the maker inside. With Glaciers, NYC-based Zach Gage has achieved exactly that.

Glaciers was an art instillation that, like the landforms from which it takes its name, slowly developed over time. I say ‘was’, but with each of its constituent pieces still running and a majority already sold, Glaciers continues indefinitely. Using forty Raspberry Pis attached to forty plainly presented Adafruit e-ink screens, Gage used Google Search’s auto-complete function to create poetry.

install4_lg

We’ve all noticed occasional funny or poignant results of the way Google tries to complete your search query for you based on the vast amount of data that passes through its search engine daily. Gage has programmed the Raspberry Pis to select the top three suggestions that follow various chosen phrases and display them on the screens. The results are striking, often moving, and usually something that most people would acknowledge as poetry, or at least poetic.

The screens refresh daily as the Pis check Google for changes and update accordingly. For some search phrases, the autocompletions can change daily; for others, it could take years. A poem you’ve had upon your wall for months on end could suddenly change unexpectedly, updating to reflect the evolving trends of user queries on the internet.

“The best paintings you can look at a thousand times and you keep seeing new things.” – Zach Gage

Glaciers is certainly an intriguing installation, with pithy observations of the vulnerability of anonymous internet users in pieces such as:

Glacier03_lg

and the (somewhat) more light-hearted:

Glacier04_lg

Zach Gage is an indie video game creator, responsible for titles such as SpellTower and the somewhat fear-inducing Lose/Lose (Space Invaders meets permanent file deletion with some 17000 files already lost to the game since launch). He’s previously used Raspberry Pis in other projects, such as his Twitter-fuelled best day ever and Fortune. I bet this isn’t the last time he does something fabulous with a Pi.

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Make masterpieces with a homemade CNC painting machine

via Arduino Blog

Longtime artist Jeff Leonard has built a pair of Arduino-driven CNC painting machines with the motivation to grow his toolbox and expand the kinds of marks he could make simply by hand. By pairing the formal elements of painting with modern-day computing, the Brooklyn-based Maker now has the ability to create things that otherwise would’ve never been possible.

Machine #1 consists of a 5’ x 7’ table and is capable of producing pieces of art up to 4’ x 5’ in size. The device features a variety of tools, including a Beugler pinstriping paint wheel, a brush with a peristaltic pump syringe feed, an airbrush with a five-color paint feed system and five peristaltic pumps from Adafruit, a squeegee, and pencils, pens, markers and other utensils.

In terms of hardware, it’s equipped with three NEMA 23 stepper motors, three Big Easy Drivers, as well as an Arduino Mega and an Uno. There are two servos and five peristaltic pumps on the carriage–the first servo raises and lowers the tool, while the second presses the trigger on the airbrush. An Adafruit motor shield on the Uno controls the pumps, and the AccelStepper library is used for the Big Easy Drivers.

According to Leonard:

I am coding directly into the Arduino. There are many different codes that I call and overlap and use as a painter overlaps techniques and ideas. There is a lot of random built into the code, I don’t know what the end result will be when I start. Typically on any kind of CNC machining the end result has been made in the computer and the machine executes the instructions. I am building a kind of visual synthesizer that I can control in real-time. There are many buttons and potentiometers that I am controlling while the routines are running. I take any marks or accidents that happen and learn how to incorporate them into a painting.

I am learning Processing now and how to incorporate it into the image making.

Machine #2, however, is a bit different. This one is actually a standup XY unit that was made as a concept project. It paints using water on magic paper that becomes black when wet and disappears as it dries, used mainly as a way to practice calligraphy or Chinese brush painting. Not only does it look great, there’s no clean up either!

In terms of tools, the machine has a brush and an airbrush. Two NEMA 17 stepper motors are tasked with the XY motion. There are also three servos–one servo lifts and lowers the armature away from the paper since there is no Z-axis, another controls the angle of the brush, and the third presses the trigger of the airbrush. A peristaltic pump helps to refill the water cup, along with a small fan. The system is powered by an Arduino Uno with an Adafruit Motor Shield using the Adafruit Motor Shield Library v2.

As awesome as it all sounds, you really have to see these gadgets in action and their finished works (many of which can be found on Instagram).

Holopainting with Raspberry Pi

via Raspberry Pi

We’ve covered 2D light-painting here before. This project takes things a step further: meet 3D holopainting.

Holo_Painting-1

This project’s an unholy mixture of stop-motion, light-painting and hyperlapse from FilmSpektakel, a time-lapse and film production company in Vienna. It was made as part of a university graduation project. (With Raspberry Pis and Raspberry Pi camera boards, natch.)

Getting this footage out was a very labour-intensive process – but the results are stupendous. The subject was filmed by a ring of 24 networked Raspberry Pi cameras working like a 3d scanner, taking pictures around the ring with a delay of 83 milliseconds between each one so that movement could be captured.

Holopainting rig

 

They then cut out all of the resulting images – told you it was labour-intensive – and put them on a black background, then fed that data into a commercial light-painting stick. (If you don’t want to fork out a ton of cash for your own light-painting stick, there are instructions on building one with a Raspberry Pi over at Adafruit.)

A man dressed as a budget ninja walked the stick in front of a series of cameras set up where the original Raspberry Pi cameras had been, to create 3D images hanging in the air.

holopainting ninja

Presto: a holopainting – and the results are tremendous. Here’s a making-of video.

The Invention of #HoloPainting

Holopainting is a combination of the Light Painting, Stop Motion and Hyperlapse technique to create three dimensional light paintings. We didn’t want to use computer generated images, so we built a giant 3D scanner out of 24 Raspberry Pis with their webcams. These cameras took photos from 24 different perspectives of the person in the middle with a delay of 83 milliseconds, so the movement of the person also was recorded.

There’s a comment that often pops up when we describe a project like this: why bother? We’ll head that off right now: because you can. Because nobody’s done it before. Because the end results look phenomenal. We love it, and we’d love to see more projects like this!

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Le Myope – a confused camera

via Raspberry Pi

This is very silly indeed.

Salade Tomate Oignon in Paris seems to be making a bit of a habit of doing outlandish things with Raspberry Pi and other people’s photography. You might remember Layer Cam from a couple of years ago, which allows you to point a sandwich box pretending to be a camera at a landmark and serves up somebody else’s picture of the same thing, using GPS coordinates and Google Image Search.

His newest Raspberry Pi hack, Le Myope (for non-Francophones, that’s The Shortsighted), actually includes a camera – but the results are not what you’d expect. Here’s a bit of video to show you more.

Le myope: a similar images Raspberry Pi camera

Short-sighted camera based on a Raspberry Pi and Google similar images. Find instruction and code to build your own: http://saladetomateoignon.com/Wordpress/a-short-sighted-raspberry-pi-camera/ Music: Samuel Belay – Qeresh Endewaza Logo: Alice www.alicesawicki.com Images: Charly www.nnprod.com

Salade Tomate Oignon says:

Even more imprecise than a blurry polaroid picture, or than a filter-abused instagram shot.
Using the most advanced algorithms based on machine learning and computer vision, here is ‘Le myope’, a short-sighted camera.
The new iteration of the layercam ‘Why are you taking this picture? It’s already on the Internet!’ is a Raspberry Pi based camera, that takes a picture and returns a similar one from Google similar image search.
Use it in a popular place and chances are that you will get the same picture taken by someone else. (That happened with the mural during one of the tests)
Use it in a remote place and get random roughly similar pictures from all over the internet!

This is an extremely daft project which pleased us out of all proportion. You can find code and instructions to build your own at Salade Tomate Oignon’s website. Go forth and take other people’s photographs.

 

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Circuit Bender Artist bends Fresnel Lens for Art

via hardware – Hackaday

Give some mundane, old gear to an artist with a liking for technology, and he can turn it into a mesmerizing piece of art. [dmitry] created “red, an optic-sound electronic object” which uses simple light sources and optical elements to create an audio-visual performance installation. The project was the result of his collaboration with the Prometheus Special Design Bureau in Kazan, Russia. The inspiration for this project was Crystall, a reconstruction of an earlier project dating back to 1966. The idea behind “red” was to recreate the ideas and concepts from the 60’s ~ 80’s using modern solutions and materials.

The main part of the art installation consists of a ruby red crystal glass and a large piece of flexible Fresnel lens, positioned in front of a bright LED light source. The light source, the crystal and the Fresnel lens all move linearly, constantly changing the optical properties of the system. A pair of servos flexes and distorts the Fresnel lens while another one flips the crystal glass. A lot of recycled materials were used for the actuators – CD-ROM drive, an old scanner mechanism and old electric motors. Its got a Raspberry-Pi running Pure Data and Python scripts, with an Arduino connected to the sensors and actuators. The sensors define the position of various mechanical elements in relation to the range of their movement. There’s a couple of big speakers, which means there’s a beefy amplifier thrown in too. The sounds are correlated to the movement of the various elements, the intensity of the light and probably the color. There’s two mechanical paddle levers hanging in there, if you folks want to hazard some guesses on what they do.

Check out some of [dmitry]’s earlier works which we featured. Here’s him Spinning a Pyrite Record for Art, and making Art from Brainwaves, Antifreeze, and Ferrofluid.


Filed under: hardware, musical hacks

Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists New Works Exhibition

via Raspberry Pi

Rachel writes: It feels like only yesterday that we launched the Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists programme, but it was April 2015 when we found nine amazing young people and embarked on a 12-month journey of field trips, mentoring sessions and lots and lots of video chats. I am very proud to hand over to Yasmin to talk about their upcoming event…

Will you witness the big reveal?

You might have heard the term Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists being thrown around, or perhaps you’ve seen us at various Raspberry Pi events over the last year! We are a bunch of young individuals, with entirely different interests and walking along our own artistic paths, but with a shared curiosity and interest in how technology can be used to further our creative work. We’ve been working with the Raspberry Pi Foundation over the past year to develop these interests and apply them to new works.

Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists New Works Exhibition poster

Come and see the results of our year of digital creativity at our Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists’ New Works Exhibition on 23 April in Cambridge!

The exhibition will be held at the Raspberry Pi Headquarters close to Cambridge train station, and will give you a chance not only to check out our own creative visions of how a Raspberry Pi can be used, but also to meet us individually and get an insight into our individual experiences while taking part in the RPCT programme. Tickets are free but spaces are strictly limited, so apply for yours now!

You can apply for tickets for either the afternoon (12pm-4pm) or the evening (6pm-9pm) session on the exhibition tickets page. Numbers are limited, so if we don’t have enough tickets to go round, we’ll pick recipients at random.

Working with the Raspberry Pi Foundation as the first participants in the Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists programme has helped formed a bridge between our cranial hemispheres, merging computer science and art to create our own unique but equally awesome projects that show how diverse the applications of technology can be when it comes to being creative.

Be sure to follow us on Twitter (@RasPiCT) or via our website (http://rpct.io/) to find out more information and see project updates during the lead-up to the exhibition!

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