Tag Archives: art

Circuit Bender Artist bends Fresnel Lens for Art

via hardware – Hackaday

Give some mundane, old gear to an artist with a liking for technology, and he can turn it into a mesmerizing piece of art. [dmitry] created “red, an optic-sound electronic object” which uses simple light sources and optical elements to create an audio-visual performance installation. The project was the result of his collaboration with the Prometheus Special Design Bureau in Kazan, Russia. The inspiration for this project was Crystall, a reconstruction of an earlier project dating back to 1966. The idea behind “red” was to recreate the ideas and concepts from the 60’s ~ 80’s using modern solutions and materials.

The main part of the art installation consists of a ruby red crystal glass and a large piece of flexible Fresnel lens, positioned in front of a bright LED light source. The light source, the crystal and the Fresnel lens all move linearly, constantly changing the optical properties of the system. A pair of servos flexes and distorts the Fresnel lens while another one flips the crystal glass. A lot of recycled materials were used for the actuators – CD-ROM drive, an old scanner mechanism and old electric motors. Its got a Raspberry-Pi running Pure Data and Python scripts, with an Arduino connected to the sensors and actuators. The sensors define the position of various mechanical elements in relation to the range of their movement. There’s a couple of big speakers, which means there’s a beefy amplifier thrown in too. The sounds are correlated to the movement of the various elements, the intensity of the light and probably the color. There’s two mechanical paddle levers hanging in there, if you folks want to hazard some guesses on what they do.

Check out some of [dmitry]’s earlier works which we featured. Here’s him Spinning a Pyrite Record for Art, and making Art from Brainwaves, Antifreeze, and Ferrofluid.


Filed under: hardware, musical hacks

Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists New Works Exhibition

via Raspberry Pi

Rachel writes: It feels like only yesterday that we launched the Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists programme, but it was April 2015 when we found nine amazing young people and embarked on a 12-month journey of field trips, mentoring sessions and lots and lots of video chats. I am very proud to hand over to Yasmin to talk about their upcoming event…

Will you witness the big reveal?

You might have heard the term Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists being thrown around, or perhaps you’ve seen us at various Raspberry Pi events over the last year! We are a bunch of young individuals, with entirely different interests and walking along our own artistic paths, but with a shared curiosity and interest in how technology can be used to further our creative work. We’ve been working with the Raspberry Pi Foundation over the past year to develop these interests and apply them to new works.

Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists New Works Exhibition poster

Come and see the results of our year of digital creativity at our Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists’ New Works Exhibition on 23 April in Cambridge!

The exhibition will be held at the Raspberry Pi Headquarters close to Cambridge train station, and will give you a chance not only to check out our own creative visions of how a Raspberry Pi can be used, but also to meet us individually and get an insight into our individual experiences while taking part in the RPCT programme. Tickets are free but spaces are strictly limited, so apply for yours now!

You can apply for tickets for either the afternoon (12pm-4pm) or the evening (6pm-9pm) session on the exhibition tickets page. Numbers are limited, so if we don’t have enough tickets to go round, we’ll pick recipients at random.

Working with the Raspberry Pi Foundation as the first participants in the Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists programme has helped formed a bridge between our cranial hemispheres, merging computer science and art to create our own unique but equally awesome projects that show how diverse the applications of technology can be when it comes to being creative.

Be sure to follow us on Twitter (@RasPiCT) or via our website (http://rpct.io/) to find out more information and see project updates during the lead-up to the exhibition!

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Macchina poetica converts sounds into onomatopoeic words

via Arduino Blog

macchinaPoetica01
Macchina Poetica is a digital prototype converting sounds into onomatopeic words and images and it’s inspired by the art of the Futurism movement.

Futurism is a modernist, avant-garde artistic movement originated in Italy in the early 20th century. Thanks to sound representation, Futurism artists aimed to emphasize speed, technology, youth and violence, all concepts arising from industrial innovations and war.

In order to keep continuity with this particular artistic movement, the authors, Alessandra Angelucci, Aris Dotti, Rebecca Guzzo, students at Master of Advanced Studies in Interaction Design SUPSI, decided to design an object that looks like the musical instrument of Futurism movement (precisely a Celesta). The object plays a metallic sounds and the user is facilitated in understanding how to use the object due to a instrument-like interface.

The machine is built using 4 piezo sensors, a thermal printer, a board, electrical cables, 4 resistors (1K), a 6 volt power supply and a Genuino Uno board.

The instrument’s interface is designed with plywood, metal plates and sponge that serves as a shock absorber. Between the metal plates and the sponge there are the piezo sensors along with resistors communicating with the Genuino Uno board every time the user interacts with the metallic plates. Once the Genuino receives the signal, it sends a command to the thermal printer that will print a word or a Futurism poem.

The interaction takes place when the user with the help of a metal tool (for example a screwdriver or a wrench) strikes the metal plates with different pressures. At the end of the performance the user and the viewers can have a clear overview of the produced sounds reviewing the printed paper outputs.

macchinaPoetica02

The prototype is the result of two weeks physical computing class Creating Tangible Interfaces held by Ubi De Feo at Maind program SUPSI  in Lugano, the goal of the course is how to make tangible interfaces via learning fundamentals of electronics prototyping and interaction design.  (Applications are open for the next edition 2016/2017 starting in September 2016)

Lichen Beacons

via Raspberry Pi

We see Raspberry Pi changing the way people teach, the way people make things, and the way they run their businesses. We’ve been particularly charmed to see how many artists use the Pi in their work too. Sometimes in places just on our doorstep.

Photograph courtesy of Krisztian Hofstadter

Photograph courtesy of Krisztian Hofstadter

On Friday, I learned about a new installation at Corpus Christi college chapel here in Cambridge. Pre-Pi, if you were creating an art installation you’d likely be using Mac Minis or a laptop (or three) to perform any computational heavy lifting. The Raspberry Pi has changed the landscape for artists who want to incorporate computation or connectivity into their works: it means the tools available to them are much cheaper, and much smaller.

The makers, Ludion (Tom Hall, Drew Milne and Barry Byford), describe Lichen Beacons as a “site-responsive installation involving spoken word texts, music, and photographs conveyed through a dialogue between Bluetooth beacons and Raspberry Pis with screens and headphones”. Corpus chapel is a place of calm and contemplation (unless you’re Laura, our copy editor, who got married to Pete in there a few years ago to the explosive strains of the Skyrim soundtrack, played on the organ); I can think of few places better for slowing down and taking time to breathe – aided by some thoughtful technology.

Lichen Ohms Seriatim (Trailer)

Short documentary on the installation ‘Lichen Ohms Seriatim’, by Tom Hall, Drew Milne and Barry Byford. Corpus Christi College, Chapel, Cambridge, UK. Part of the Festival of Ideas, 2015-10-24. More information at http://www.ludions.com/projects/lichens/

After I saw this video, I pestered Barry to put some words online about the build process, and the way the poetry, music, ambient sounds and images came together. He’s really outdone himself: there’s an extraordinarily detailed background to the work (including the technical framework) available on Ludion’s website which you should really take some time to read.

This installation is multi-layered, intensely thoughtful and designed to slow down the experience of the person encountering it. I’ll be dropping by to play with and listen to my own Pi inna box later in the week. We could all use a spot of contemplation once in a while.

 

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Light painting with a Raspberry Pi

via Raspberry Pi

Before we get to the meat of today’s post, we’ve two bits of news. Just over an hour ago we watched the Soyuz rocket carrying British ESA astronaut Tim Peake, who will be in charge of the two Astro Pis on the ISS, lift off. The Soyuz will dock with the ISS around 17:24 GMT today: please join us following Tim’s progress on Twitter from about 16:45 GMT. (You can also watch live footage at NASA TV.)

In other Raspberry Pi community news, we’re very pleased to announce that Yasmin Bey, a 14-year-old Pi developer from Southend, organiser of school computer clubs, and friend of many at Pi Towers, won the EU Digital Girl of the Year award, which this year was awarded jointly with Niamh Scanlon from Dublin. We’ve been watching Yasmin’s progress over the last year or so: she’s an astonishingly focussed and exceptionally smart girl, and we wish her all the success in the world. Well done Yasmin – we’re really proud of you!

Back to light painting.

raspberry_pi_rainbow2

LadyAda from New York’s Adafruit dropped me a very short email at the end of last week, saying “You must see this.” As usual, she was right. This is one of the most eye-catching projects we’ve come across this year.

What you’re seeing in the photo above is a persistence of vision (POV) effect, where a slow shutter speed is used to capture a row of LEDs which change as they’re moved across the frame (in this instance by someone carrying and sweeping the LEDs from one side of the picture to the other over a period of a couple of seconds).

raspberry_pi_nasa

It’s a really impressive effect, and it’s a rig you should be able to build yourself at home, using a Raspberry Pi and some additional kit. Adafruit has covered the subject before, but they’ve discovered that their new DotStar LEDs make things much easier and much better looking. DotStar LEDs use generic 2-wire SPI, so you can push data much faster than with the NeoPixels’ 800 KHz protocol, and you don’t need to mess around with specific timing functions. They also have much higher pulse width modulation (PWM), which means that things look a lot smoother and less flickery than in POV projects made with other LEDs. Result: cleaner, more detailed light painting.

raspberry_pi_bowser

Adafruit have a made a very thorough tutorial which will help you build a 1m light painter which can support most common image formats. They’ve also helpfully included instructions on making your photos taken with this setup as bright and sharp as possible.

raspberry_pi_episode7

We’re wondering if we have enough time to build our own rig for Christmas. If you make your own, please post a link in the comments!

 

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Now Available for Download: Processing

via Raspberry Pi

I’m a long-time fan of Processing, a free open source programming language and development environment focused on teaching coding in the context of visual arts. It’s why I’m so excited that the latest version, Processing 3.0.1, now officially supports Raspberry Pi. Just as Sonic Pi lets you make your first sound in just one line of code, Processing lets you draw on screen with just one line of code. It’s that easy to get started. But don’t let that fool you, it’s a very powerful and flexible language and development environment.

Screenshot of Processing development environment

We owe a huge thank you to Gottfried Haider, who did the heavy lifting to get Processing running smoothly on the Raspberry Pi and create a hardware input/output library. That’s right, this version of Processing works with the GPIO pins right out of the box. Gottfried says:

I’m excited about having Processing on the Raspberry Pi and other low-cost desktop machines. In the last few years we’ve seen a shift away from easily accessible environments, towards concepts such as mobile platforms, specialized internet-of-things devices and cloud computing. As someone who got into programming by tinkering around with the open and readily available platforms of the time, I believe it’s important to have initiatives such Raspberry Pi and Processing, to promote software literacy and to encourage a future where computers remain a read/write medium.

If you’re new to Processing, please take a look at our newest resource, Introduction to Processing. Not only does it get you started programming with Processing on the Raspberry Pi, but it also covers basic hardware input/output. As with all of our free resources, we welcome you to contribute enhancements and fixes. For those of you who prefer something more in-depth, Processing co-founders Ben Fry and Casey Reas recently released a second edition of their book Getting Started with Processing, published by Maker Media.

If you want to jump right in, you can download and install Processing from the terminal with this command:

curl https://processing.org/download/install-arm.sh | sudo sh

Or go to Processing’s downloads page to download and install it on your own.

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