Tag Archives: bluetooth

A Solar-Powered Headset From Recycled Parts

via hardware – Hackaday

Solar power has surged ahead in recent years, and access for the individual has grown accordingly. Not waiting around for a commercial alternative, Instructables user [taifur] has gone ahead and built himself a solar-powered Bluetooth headset.

Made almost completely of recycled components — reducing e-waste helps us all — only the 1 W flexible solar panel, voltage regulator, and the RN-52 Bluetooth module were purchased for this project. The base of the headset has been converted from [taifur]’s old wired one, meanwhile a salvaged boost converter, and charge controller — for a lithium-ion battery — form the power circuit. An Apple button makes an appearance alongside a control panel for a portable DVD player (of all things), and an MP4 player’s battery. Some careful recovery and reconfiguration work done, reassembly with a little assistance from the handyman’s secret weapon — duct tape — and gobs of hot glue bore a wireless fruit ready to receive the sun’s bounty.

fwa5ml4iykg2y8a_bright fjww60biykg3227_bright

Taking the initiative to go green using solar power– taken literally — could also result in getting into hydroponic gardening.


Filed under: hardware, how-to, portable audio hacks, solar hacks

Taking A Robot For A Drive

via hardware – Hackaday

Instructables user [Roboro] had a Mad Catz Xbox steering wheel controller he hasn’t had much use for of late, so he decided to hack and use it as a controller for a robot instead.

Conceivably, you could use any RC car, but [Roboro] is reusing one he used for a robot sumo competition a few years back. Cracking open the controller revealed a warren of wires that were — surprise, surprise — grouped and labelled, making for a far less painful hacking process. Of course, [Roboro] is only using the Xbox button for power, the player-two LED to show the connection status, the wheel, and the pedals, but knowing which wires are which might come in handy later.

An Arduino Uno in the wheel and a Nano in the robot are connected via CC41-A Bluetooth modules which — despite having less functionality than the HM10 module they’re cloned from — perform admirably. A bit of code and integration of a SN754410 H-bridge motor driver — the Arduino doesn’t supply enough current to [Roboro]’s robot’s motors — and the little robot’s ready for its test drive.

[Roboro]’s suggested improvements are servo steering for the robot, upgrading to the HM10 module, more sensors to take advantage of the other buttons on the wheel, and a camera — because who doesn’t love some good ol’ fashioned FPV racing?


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, hardware, robots hacks

The Power Glove Ultra Is The Power Glove We Finally Deserve

via hardware – Hackaday

How do you make the most awesome gaming peripheral ever made even more bad? Give it a 21st-century upgrade! [Alessio Cosenza] calls this mod the Power Glove Ultra, and it works exactly as we imagined it should have all those years ago.

The most noticeable change is the 3D-printed attachment that hosts the Bluetooth module, a combination USB charger and voltage booster, and a Metro Mini(ATmega328) board. On top of a 20-hour battery life, a 9-axis accelerometer, gyroscope, and compass gives the Power Glove Ultra full 360-degree motion tracking and upgrades the functionality of the finger sensors with a custom board and five flex sensor strips with 256 possible positions for far more nuanced input. [Cosenza] has deliberately left the boards and wires exposed for that cyberpunk, retro-future look that is so, so bad.

Power Glove Ultra Poster[Cosenza] has also modified a Wiimote Nunchuck controller to provide complimentary functionality for games that require an analog stick (such as a first-person shooter game). [Cosenza] aims to keep the project open source for the love of the glove and the community surrounding it, though he says the code isn’t at the point where he’s comfortable releasing it.

Until those files are released, our craving for something we love because it’s so bad must be satiated by a few other Power Glove hacks. A few years ago, we saw the Power Glove used as the perfect tool for stop-motion animation, and take over Maker Faire with a glove-controlled drone. There’s still a lot of life left in the electronic glove, and with the current trend of wearable electronics, we’re only going to see more. This time, hopefully without pre-teen antagonists telling us how bad something is.

[Thanks for the tip, Nils Hitze!]


Filed under: hardware, home entertainment hacks, Microcontrollers, nintendo hacks

Bluetooth Speaker With Neopixel Visual Display!

via hardware – Hackaday

Finding a product that is everything you want isn’t always possible. Making your own that checks off all those boxes can be. [Peter Clough] took the latter route and built a small Bluetooth speaker with an LED visualization display that he calls Magic Box.

A beefy 20W, 4Ohm speaker was screwed to the lid of a wooden box converted to the purpose. [Clough] cut a clear plastic sheet to the dimensions of the box, notching it 2cm from the edge to glue what would become the sound reactive neopixel strip into place — made possible by an electret microphone amplifier. There ended up being plenty of room inside the speaker box to cram an Arduino Pro Mini 3.3V, the RN-52 Bluetooth receiver, and the rest of the components, with an aux cable running out the base of the speaker. As a neat touch, neodymium magnets hold the lid closed.

Magic Box Bluetooth Speaker ComponentsWe gotta say, a custom speaker with LED visualization makes for a tidy little package — aside from the satisfaction that comes from building it yourself.

Depending on your particular situation, you may even opt to design a speaker that attaches to a magnet implanted in your head.

[via /r/DIY]


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, hardware, led hacks, musical hacks

30kmph Bluetooth skateboard from the Raspberry Pi Guy

via Raspberry Pi

We are immensely fond of tutorial-maker extraordinaire Matt Timmons-Brown, who you may know as The Raspberry Pi Guy, and we treasure his widdle brain. Matt, please wear a helmet consistently next time you use this skateboard monster thing.

DIY 30KM/H ELECTRIC SKATEBOARD – RASPBERRY PI POWERED

Over the summer, I made my own electric skateboard using a £4 Raspberry Pi Zero. Controlled with a Nintendo Wiimote, capable of going 30km/h, and with a range of over 10km, this project has been pretty darn fun. In this video, you see me racing around Cambridge and I explain the ins and outs of this project.

This is a beautiful build, with a Bluetooth-connected Raspberry Pi Zero controlling the speed of the brushless motor that drives the board. Matt’s using a Wiimote to control the speed, and terrifying the residents of Cambridge into the bargain.

The metal boxes underneath the skateboard that Matt’s made to house the battery and electronics are, in a way, the most important part of the build. When you’re tooling along at 30kmph, the last thing you want to do is to grate your lithium-ion battery on the tarmac at speed.

Matt visited Pi Towers to show us what he’d made, and Gordon had a go. You’ll want to turn the sound on.

Sk8r Pi ft. The Raspberry Pi Guy… and Gordon

The Raspberry Pi Guy popped into Pi Towers to show off his new creation. While skating up and down the office on his Pi-powered skateboard, our Director of Software Engineering, Gordon Hollingworth, decided to have a go.

Beautiful build, Matt – thanks for sharing!

The post 30kmph Bluetooth skateboard from the Raspberry Pi Guy appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Internet of Things Pregnancy Test

via Raspberry Pi

“The project idea came from this tongue-in-cheek Twitter post. But hey, why not try to make one? I read somewhere that the world needs more ridiculous smart devices”. These are the words of Eric Tsai, a maker of connected devices and home automation, on his website etsai.net. And while this website boasts many interesting and useful projects (plus a watermelon sea monster), it was his tongue-in-cheek ‘Too Much IoT’ project on hackster.io that had us chuckling. The aforementioned Twitter post?

Eric Tsai on Twitter

IoT pregnancy test: connects to phone via BLE, instantly tweets test results. Also text msg result to contacts name “mom”.

Eric did indeed create an IoT pregnancy test: it’s a Bluetooth-enabled digital pregnancy test that sends data to a Raspberry Pi which, in turn, sends a tweet of the result (as well as a special text message to your Mum).

To start his project, Eric turned to an unsuspecting customer service representative, quizzing her on the composition of a digital pregnancy test:

Does your test have an ON button? What kind of battery does it use? Do the different characters on the LCD overlap, or are they separated? Well, I mean, is “Pregnant” the same as “Not Pregnant”, but just without the “Not”? You need a serial number? No, I don’t have a serial number, I haven’t purchased it yet. Oh, well… I like to be prepared.

And after that, a search of YouTube provided the information he needed in order to hack the test.

IoT Pregnancy Test

After working his way through the internals of the test, the LCD pins, and the energy consumption, Eric was able to hijack the correct components and solder new wiring to gain control of the ‘not’ and ‘pregnant’ portions of the display, along with the clock function and, obviously, the ground.

IoT Pregnancy Test

Eric added header pins to the test, allowing him to connect a Light Blue Bean, which in turn provided Bluetooth and I/O functionality. He explains:

The Light Blue Bean provides the real world I/O and Bluetooth connectivity. The digital I/O monitors the “Not” and “Pregnant” pins on the LCD and compares them to the “clock”. When they don’t match, it means the corresponding icon is being displayed.

The Raspberry Pi runs Node-RED to receive data from the Bean. Using Twilio, the Pi can tweet, text, or email the information to any predetermined recipient, advising them of the test results.

IoT Pregnancy Test

As a home automation pro, Eric already had several lights in his house set up via MQTT and OpenHAB, so it wasn’t hard for him to incorporate them into the project, triggering them to light up to indicate a positive result.

Though the project was originally started as a joke, it’s clear to see that Eric enjoyed the process and learnt from the experience. And if that wasn’t enough, he also used the hackster.io project page as a means of announcing the news of his own impending bundle of joy. So congratulations to Eric and his family, and thank you for this brilliant project!

Too Much IoT on Twitter

Pregnant! Yay!

Connected Pregnancy Test – Long Version

A pregnancy test that tweets and text messages test results. https://www.hackster.io/projects/15076/

 

 

The post Internet of Things Pregnancy Test appeared first on Raspberry Pi.