Tag Archives: camera

Virtual Forest

via Raspberry Pi

The RICOH THETA S is a fairly affordable consumer 360° camera, which allows users to capture interesting locations and events for viewing through VR headsets and mobile-equipped Google Cardboard. When set up alongside a Raspberry Pi acting as a controller, plus a protective bubble, various cables, and good ol’ Mother Nature, the camera becomes a gateway to a serene escape from city life.

Virtual Forest

Ecologist Koen Hufkens, from the Richardson Lab in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University, decided to do exactly that, creating the Virtual Forest with the aim of “showing people how the forest changes throughout the seasons…and the beauty of the forest”.

The camera takes a still photograph every 15 minutes, uploading it for our viewing pleasure. The setup currently only supports daylight viewing, as the camera is not equipped for night vision, so check your watch first.

one autumn day

360 view of a day in a North-Eastern Hardwood forest during autumn

The build cost somewhere in the region of $500 to create; Hufkens provides a complete ingredients list here, with supporting code on GitHub. He also aims to improve the setup by using the new Nikon KeyMission, which can record video at 4K ultra-HD resolution.

The Virtual Forest has been placed deep within the heart of Harvard Forest, a university-owned plot of land used both by researchers and by the general public. If you live nearby, you could go look at it and possibly even appear in a photo. Please resist the urge to photobomb, though, because that would totally defeat the peopleless zen tranquility that we’re feeling here in Pi Towers.

The post Virtual Forest appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

DIY Optical Sensor Breakout Board makes DIY Optical Mouse

via hardware – Hackaday

Wanting to experiment with using optical mouse sensors but a bit frustrated with the lack of options, [Tom Wiggins] rolled his own breakout board for the ADNS 3050 optical mouse sensor and in the process of developing it used it to make his own 3D-printed optical mouse. Optical mouse sensors are essentially self-contained cameras that track movement and make it available to a host. To work properly, the sensor needs a lens assembly and appropriate illumination, both of which mate to a specialized bracket along with the sensor. [Tom] found a replacement for the original ADNS LED but still couldn’t find the sensor bracket anywhere, so he designed his own.

optical-mouse-sensor-breakout-squareThe github repository contains all the design files as well as Arduino libraries. Thinking others might share his interest in an easy to use breakout board for the ADNS 3050 that doubles as the mounting bracket, [Tom] started a Kickstarter campaign for a small production run.

Optical mouse sensors have often shown up as experimental movement trackers in hobby robotics, and even as low-res cameras. There’s a lot going on in these little packages and [Tom]’s fully documented open-source design tries to make it more accessible.


Filed under: hardware, peripherals hacks

Raspberry Pi astrophotography

via Raspberry Pi

Tonight marks the appearance of the brightest supermoon to grace the sky since 1948, appearing 30% brighter and 14% bigger than the usual glowing orb. The moon will not be this close again until November 2034.

Given this, and assuming the sky remains clear enough tonight to catch a glimpse, here’s one of several Raspberry Pi-powered astrophotography projects to get your creative senses tingling.

Having already created a similar project with a Nokia Lumia, TJ “Lifetime tinkerer” Emsley decided to try attaching a Raspberry Pi and Camera Module to a newly adopted Tesco 45X refractor telescope. They added a $10 USB shield, wireless NIC, and the usual setup components, and the project was underway.

TJ EMSLEY Moon Photography

TJ designed and 3D-printed a mount and bracket; the files are available on Thingiverse for those interested in building their own. The two-part design allows for use with various telescopes, thanks to an adjustable eyepiece adapter.

A Pi Zero fits onto the bracket, the Pi camera snug to the eyepiece, and the build is ready.

TJ EMSLEY Moon Photography

The Pi runs code written by TJ, allowing for image preview and exposure adjustments. You can choose between video and still images, and you can trigger the camera via a keyboard; this way, you don’t unsettle the camera to capture an image by having to touch the adapter in any way.

TJ will eventually be uploading the project to GitHub, but a short search will help you to build your own camera code (start here), so why not share your astrophotography with us in the comments below?

Enjoy the supermoon!

The post Raspberry Pi astrophotography appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Ophthalmoscope: Saving eyes with Raspberry Pis

via Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi is being used to save the eyesight of people in India thanks to the Open Indirect Ophthalmoscope (OIO) project. 

Inside the OIO, machine learning technology is used to spot eye problems. Subsequently, the OIO becomes better at checking for problems over long-term use.

“The Open Indirect Ophthalmoscope is a portable retinal camera that uses machine learning to make diagnosis not only affordable but also accurate and reliable,” says Sandeep Vempati, a mechanical engineer at the Srujana Center for Innovation, a part of the L V Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI).

The heart of the OIO is a Raspberry Pi. Our low-cost computer drives down the cost of taking high-quality photos of the retina.

“Currently, visual impairment affects 285 million people worldwide,” said Sandeep. “What’s more surprising is the fact that 80 percent of all visual impairment can be prevented or cured, if diagnosed correctly.”

Open Indirect Ophthalmoscope (OIO)

An open-source, ultra-low cost, portable screening device for retinal diseases. OIO(OWL) is an idea conceived in Srujana Innovation Centre at the L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India. It is an open source retinal image capturing device with dynamic diabetic retinopathy grading system.

“India is the diabetes capital of the world,” explained Dr Jay Chhablani, a specialist in retinal disease at the LVPEI. “Diabetes leads to something called diabetic retinopathy”.

For that reason, it’s important to remove barriers to treatment. “If we see the patient at an early stage,” says Dr Chhablani, “we can treat them by controlling diabetes and applying laser treatment”.

“Although eye care services have become increasingly available,” said Sandeep, “diagnosing diseases like diabetic retinopathy is still a problem in many parts of the world.”

Sandeep’s team strove to build an open device. As a result, OIO can be 3D printed and assembled anywhere in the world.

Open Direct Ophthalmoscope

Inside the Open Indirect Ophthalmoscope project

“3D printing creates the OIO for a fraction of the cost of conventional devices, and yet maintains the same quality,” explains Sandeep.

Compared to professional devices, the OIO costs just $800 to build. In contrast, professional retinal cameras can cost around ten times as much.

Over on OIO’s Hackaday page you will find the components. Inside is a Raspberry Pi 3, a Camera Module, a 20 dioptre lens, front-end mirrors, and a 5-inch touchscreen.

“Engineering feels great when you see a product being useful in the real world,” says Sandeep.

The post Ophthalmoscope: Saving eyes with Raspberry Pis appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Infrared Mouse Camera

via Raspberry Pi

When YouTube user mrfid72 discovered evidence of a little critter occupying his shed, he did what every maker would do and set up a Pi camera to catch all their nocturnal antics.

Using four ultrasonic units to create a barrier around his rat trap, Mr. Fid set his Pi to take a high-resolution, timestamped photo alongside two minutes of HD video whenever the distance between the units was shortened by a furry obstruction. The Pi also turned on an infrared light to better catch the action.

Images are then emailed directly to a predetermined address, while all footage is uploaded to a web page via FTP, allowing Mr. Fid to check up on any prerecorded action in the shed whenever he wishes, providing he has internet connectivity.

He continued to record the mouse over several nights, each day reviewing the footage to understand how the mouse was foiling his trap to obtain the delicious treats within. 

Follow the action via the video below, right to the end where OMGIT’SSOCUTEANDFLUFFY!

Raspberry pi infared Mouse Cam.

Raspberry pi infrared mouse camera. using 4 ultrasonic units to measure the distance around a rat trap, as soon as the distance is shorten by an obstruction then the raspberry pi firstly turns on the IR light source, then takes a low resolution time stamped photo, then a big picture followed by two minuted of hd video.

 

The post Infrared Mouse Camera appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Pi-powered Mansfield Holiday Zoom Movie Camera

via Raspberry Pi

When John Sichi discovered a Mansfield Holiday Zoom movie camera on Yerdle, he was instantly transported back to a childhood of making home movies with his family.

The camera was fully operational, but sadly the lens was damaged. 

With the cost of parts, film, and development an unreasonable expense, John decided to digitise the camera using a Raspberry Pi Zero and Pi camera module.

Pi-powered Mansfield Holiday Zoom Movie Camera

To fit the Pi in place, John was forced to pull out the inner workings; unfortunately this meant he had to lose the nostalgic whirring noise of the inner springs which would originally have spun as the movie was recorded.

Using a scrap piece of metal, he was able to create a stop/start button from the existing trigger: hold it down to record, and release to stop.

A USB battery pack provides power to the Pi while bits of LEGO and Sugru hold it in place. 

Pi-powered Mansfield Holiday Zoom Movie Camera

John decided to mount the camera module externally, as he did not want to risk damaging the body of the Mansfield. A further upgrade would aim to use a camera with functional lens, thereby fully incorporating the new tech with the old functionality. 

Code for the camera is available via GitHub while sample footage from the camera can be found below. As you can see, the build works beautifully, and that retro image quality is incredibly evocative. Great work, John! 

Holiday Pi retrocamera

Uploaded by jsichi on 2016-09-14.

 

The post Pi-powered Mansfield Holiday Zoom Movie Camera appeared first on Raspberry Pi.