Tag Archives: Christmas

The Raspberry Pi Christmas Shopping List 2016

via Raspberry Pi

Feeling stuck for what to buy the beloved maker in your life? Maybe your niece wants to get into Minecraft hacking, or your Dad fancies his hand at home automation on a budget?

Maybe you’ve seen Raspberry Pi in the news and figure it would be a fun activity for the family, or you’re stuck for what to buy the Pi pro who’s slowly filling your spare room with wires, servers, and a mysterious, unidentified object that keeps beeping?

Whatever the reason, you’re in the right place. The Raspberry Pi Christmas Shopping List is here to help you out.

For the beginner

Here are some of our favourite bits to get them started.

  • A Raspberry Pi Starter Kit will give your budding maker everything they need to get started. There’s a whole host of options, from our own kit to project-specific collections from our friends at The Pi Hut and Pimoroni in the UK, Adafruit in the USA, Canakit in Canada, and RS Components across the globe.

Marc Scott Beginner's Guide to Coding Book

  • They may already have a screen, keyboard, and mouse, but having a separate display allows them free rein to play to their heart’s content. The pi-top takes the form of a laptop, while the pi-topCEED still requires a mouse and keyboard.

pi-top

CamJam EduKit

For the hobbyist

They’ve been tinkering with LEDs and servo motors for a while. Now it’s time to pull out the big guns.

  • Help to broaden their interest by introducing them to some of the brilliant products over at Bare Conductive. Pair up the Pi Cap with some Electric Paint, and they’ll create an interactive masterpiece by the time the Queen’s Speech is on.

Bare Conductive

  • Add to their maker toolkit with some of the great products in the RasPiO range. The GPIO Zero Ruler will be an instant hit, and a great stocking filler for anyone wanting to do more with the GPIO pins.

GPIO Zero Ruler

Camera Kit Adafruit

For the tech whizz

You don’t understand half the things they talk about at the dinner table, but they seem to be enthusiastic and that’s all that counts.

  • Help them organise their components with a handy Storage Organiser. We swear by them here at Pi Towers.

Storage

Helping Hand

  • And then there’s the PiBorg. Treat them to the superfast DiddyBorg and you’ll be hailed as gift-buyer supreme (sorry if you’ll have to better this next year).

Diddybord

  • And then there’s the Raspberry Pi Zero. Check out availability here and buy them the sought-after $5 beast of an SBC.

For the… I really have no idea what to buy them this year

There’s always one, right?

  • A physical subscription to The MagPi Magazine is sure to go down well. And with the added bonus of a free Raspberry Pi Zero, you’ll win this Christmastime. Well done, you!

MagPi_Logo

 

Stocking fillers for everyone

Regardless of their experience and tech know-how, here are some great stocking fillers that everyone will enjoy.

 

STEM-ish gifts that everyone will love

These books are top of everyone’s lists this year, and for good reason. Why not broaden the interest of the Pi fan in your life with one of these brilliant reads?

The post The Raspberry Pi Christmas Shopping List 2016 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Alex’s Festive Baubles

via Raspberry Pi

I made a thing. And because I love you all, I’m going to share the thing with you. Thing? Things! I’m going to share the things. Here you go: baubles!

Raspberry Pi and Code Club Christmas Decorations

These 3D-printable Raspberry Pi and Code Club decorations are the perfect addition to any Christmas tree this year. And if you don’t have a tree, they’re the perfect non-festive addition to life in general. There’s really no reason to say no.

The .stl files you’ll need to make the baubles are available via MyMiniFactory (Raspberry Pi/Code Club) and Thingiverse (Raspberry Pi/Code Club). They’re published under a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 3.0 license. This means that you can make a pile of decorations for your tree and for your friends, though we do have to ask you not to change the designs, as the logos they’re based on are our trademarks.

Here’s a video of the prototype printout being made. If you can help it, try not to use a brim on your print. Brims, though helpful, are a nightmare to remove from the fiddly Pi logo.

Enjoy.

3D Printed Raspberry Pi Logo

Print time: 20 mins. Printer: Ultimaker 2+ Material: ABS With thanks to Makespace for use of the 3D printer: http://makespace.org/ and Safakash for the music: https://soundcloud.com/safakash

 

 

The post Alex’s Festive Baubles appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Alex’s Festive Baubles

via Raspberry Pi

I made a thing. And because I love you all, I’m going to share the thing with you. Thing? Things! I’m going to share the things. Here you go: baubles!

Raspberry Pi and Code Club Christmas Decorations

These 3D-printable Raspberry Pi and Code Club decorations are the perfect addition to any Christmas tree this year. And if you don’t have a tree, they’re the perfect non-festive addition to life in general. There’s really no reason to say no.

The .stl files you’ll need to make the baubles are available via MyMiniFactory (Raspberry Pi/Code Club) and Thingiverse (Raspberry Pi/Code Club). They’re published under a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 3.0 license. This means that you can make a pile of decorations for your tree and for your friends, though we do have to ask you not to change the designs, as the logos they’re based on are our trademarks.

Here’s a video of the prototype printout being made. If you can help it, try not to use a brim on your print. Brims, though helpful, are a nightmare to remove from the fiddly Pi logo.

Enjoy.

3D Printed Raspberry Pi Logo

Print time: 20 mins. Printer: Ultimaker 2+ Material: ABS With thanks to Makespace for use of the 3D printer: http://makespace.org/ and Safakash for the music: https://soundcloud.com/safakash

 

 

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Christmas Special: The MagPi 52 is out now!

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The MagPi Christmas Special is out now.

For the festive season, the official magazine of the Raspberry Pi community is having a maker special. This edition is packed with fun festive projects!

The MagPi issue 52 cover

The MagPi issue 52 cover

Click here to download the MagPi Christmas Special

Here are just some of the fun projects inside this festive issue:

  • Magazine tree: turn the special cover into a Christmas tree, using LED lights to create a shiny, blinky display
  • DIY decorations: bling out your tree with NeoPixels and code
  • Santa tracker: follow Santa Claus around the world with a Raspberry Pi
  • Christmas crackers: the best low-cost presents for makers and hackers
  • Yuletide game: build Sliders, a fab block-sliding game with a festive feel.

Sliders

A Christmas game from the MagPi No.52

Inside the MagPi Christmas special

If you’re a bit Grinchy when it comes to Christmas, there’s plenty of non-festive fun to be found too:

  • Learn to use VNC Viewer
  • Find out how to build a sunrise alarm clock
  • Read our in-depth guide to Amiga emulation
  • Discover the joys of parallel computing

There’s also a huge amount of community news this month. The MagPi has an exclusive feature on Pioneers, our new programme for 12- to 15-year-olds, and news about Astro Pi winning the Arthur Clarke Award.

The Pioneers

The MagPi outlines our new Pioneers programme in detail

After that, we see some of the most stylish projects ever. Inside is the beautiful Sisyphus table; that’s a moving work of art, a facial recognition door lock, and a working loom controlled by a Raspberry Pi.

The MagPi 52 Sisyphus Project Focus

The MagPi interviews the maker of this amazing Sisyphus table

If that wasn’t enough, we also have a big feature on adding sensors to your robots. These can be used to built a battle-bot ready for the upcoming Pi Wars challenge.

The MagPi team wishes you all a merry Christmas! You can grab The MagPi 52 in stores today: it’s in WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda in the UK, and it will be in Micro Center and selected Barnes & Noble stores when it comes to America. You can also buy the print edition online from our store, and it’s available digitally on our Android and iOS app.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and get a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero, and a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

If you subscribe to The MagPi before 7 December 2016, you will get a free Pi Zero in time for Christmas.

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Found a Raspberry Pi in your Christmas stocking this morning? Read on!

via Raspberry Pi

If you woke up this morning to find a Raspberry Pi stuffed into your Christmas stocking then you’ve come to the right place. Hurrah! (And if—like mine—your stocking contained a desiccated satsuma, Captain Pugwash bubble bath, and a pack of “Root Vegetable” Top Trumps then you are equally welcome.)

santa

With a Raspberry Pi computer you can you can build robots, observe wildlife, make music, learn to program, hack Minecraft and generally create amazing things. The Raspberry Pi is also special because you have to tell it what to do, not the other way round. You are in charge and it’s a brilliantly different experience to using a laptop or tablet. So before I go to bed this Christmas morning I thought I’d share a few tips to get you started:

1. Get the latest software

All computers and digital devices need an operating system to tell them how to work. The Raspberry Pi uses a free operating system called Raspbian and it’s really important that you are running the latest version. Download it here.

2. Plug it in and start it up

Our Help pages have full instructions to get up and running, along with lots of other advice for using your Pi. (You can ignore the bit about logging in at the end if you have the latest version of Raspbian.)

If you have any issues setting up your Raspberry Pi that aren’t answered in the Help section then please visit our forums. Our forum members are a very friendly bunch and will help you with any problems. The FAQ also has lots of tips and useful information.

A word on powering your Pi

Do make sure that you have a good quality power supply. Some cheaper supplies do not output the power that they claim. Any quality smartphone charger, for example, rated 2A and above would be perfect (raid the kitchen drawers!)

Buy_Pi_Cover-01

3. It’s plugged in. It’s running. It’s awesome! Now what?

Because the Raspberry Pi is a general purpose computer, you can do loads of stuff with it. But because it’s also small and light and doesn’t use much power, you can do even more amazing things. For younger Pi People we recommend Carrie Anne Philbin’s Adventures in Raspberry Pi, which will get you set up and making cool stuff in no time. Otherwise take a look at the book section of our recommended Christmas gifts. (In fact have a look at the whole post—it’s got some great ideas!)

4. Additional resources and projects

Our lovely and free resources show you how to do everything from making games to composing music;  from making time lapse movies to the basics of programming.

The MagPi magazine is full of tutorials, fun projects, creative ideas, and community love. It’s free and quite excellent.

If you are still stuck for inspiration then have a trawl through our blog, which is an inspiring read and will get you thinking, “Wow! I’m going to have a go at that!”

Screen Shot 2015-12-10 at 13.57.55

5. And finally…

Merry Christmas! After a very busy year we’re taking some time off to spend with our families and we’ll be back in a few days.

Come and talk to us and our wonderful community on the forums if you get stuck. Above all: have fun and make cool stuff! See you soon.

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