Tag Archives: Community

Build a remote control robot with The MagPi 51

via Raspberry Pi

Hi, Rob from The MagPi here! Issue 51 is out and just in case you weren’t sold on it already, here’s a little something to tempt you.

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Brian Corteil, writer of the feature, has christened this robot ‘Tiny’

Over the past few years, Raspberry Pi robotics has really come into its own, taking strides to make building robots just that little bit more fun and accessible. This month in The MagPi, we’ve decided to take all these advances and use them to create an incredible little robot.

We’ll guide you through the process of making your robot while also giving you top advice on other methods for robot construction, in case you feel the spark of inspiration once the build is over. It’s not just robots we’re building this issue though. We have some amazing tutorials on the following:

  • Building an underwater camera
  • Finishing up our RaspCade arcade cabinet build
  • A guide to NOOBS for beginners
  • Using WiFi signals as a people detector

There’s lots more to enjoy, including reviews, columns, and a series of spooky and simple Halloween projects.

You can get hold of the latest issue in stores now from WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. Alternatively you can grab an issue online or get it digitally via our app on Android and iOS. There’s even a free PDF of it as well! You’re spoilt for choice…

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and get a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero, together with a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 51.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

We hope you enjoy the issue!

The post Build a remote control robot with The MagPi 51 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Celebrating our community!

via Raspberry Pi

Last month, we celebrated the milestone of ten million Raspberry Pi computers sold to date. That’s quite extraordinary, and we’re thrilled to have reached so many people, not just through selling computers, but through our educational programmes and outreach activities. Our successes come in no small part from the support of our wonderful community, and we’d like to take this opportunity to thank you all for the great work that you do to further our mission to put the power of digital making in the hands of people around the world.

Astro Pi winner Hannah Belshaw

Astro Pi winner Hannah Belshaw

One of the things I love most about our community is the mix of people from different backgrounds. When Jams started to appear in mid-2012, all sorts of people came together to learn with Raspberry Pi: hardware hackers, software developers, electronic engineers, teachers, kids, parents, and grandparents.

It’s our great privilege to have the Duke of York as Patron of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and we benefit enormously from his support. On Wednesday evening, he kindly hosted an event at St. James’s Palace to celebrate the Raspberry Pi community. We couldn’t invite everybody we wanted to be there, but we were lucky enough to be able to share the evening with 150 community members.

When we launched the first Raspberry Pi computer four-and-a-half years ago, we had very modest goals. Our founders wanted to inspire more young people to go to university to study computer science. Today, our reach is far greater, and we’re touching the lives of people of all ages in communities around the world.

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It’s amazing to reflect on how far we’ve come in such a short space of time: not only are we now the best-selling British computer in history, but we’ve made a real impact in education by making programmable computers affordable, training teachers, and providing free learning resources. Tens of thousands of young people have taken part in our educational programmes and competitions. Astro Pi, our very own space mission, has seen young people from the UK design experiments and apps that have run on Raspberry Pi computers on the International Space Station; this marvellous feat will continue with our newly announced European-wide competition.

Maria, Clare and Rik

Maria, Clare and Rik

Everybody in the community contributes in a different way. Whether they help run Raspberry Jams, CoderDojos or Code Clubs, write tutorials and lesson plans, share their projects on GitHub and social media, or create open-source software libraries, it all helps us reach more people. It’s amazing how something an individual can do, no matter how small it seems, can make such a big difference. I followed the Raspberry Pi blog through 2011 and bought a Pi on launch day. If you’d have told me that 5 years later my Python library would be in Eben’s top 5 software projects in The MagPi, I’d never have believed you!

I ran a workshop for Jam organisers last weekend, and at the start of the day I asked everyone why they run their Raspberry Jams. The responses really sum up how amazing our community is:

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Thank you from all of us at the Foundation to everyone participating in activities which help us to extend the opportunity to learn computing and digital making to millions of people around the world. You really are making a big difference, and we’re incredibly grateful to have you all as part of our community.

The post Celebrating our community! appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

The 50 greatest Pi projects ever in The MagPi 50

via Raspberry Pi

Rob from The MagPi here! We’re absolutely thrilled finally to be able to share with you The MagPi 50, our landmark issue with a super special feature on the 50 greatest Raspberry Pi projects of all time, the top 20 of which were voted on by you, the Raspberry Pi community.

The MagPi magazine issue 50: silver text on the cover reads "50 greatest Raspberry Pi projects"

The MagPi 50, out right this instant

As well as the thousands who voted, we had a panel of judges choosing the best projects in a few special categories. Eben Upton, the man behind Raspberry Pi, gave us his picks of software projects. Philip Colligan, CEO of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, carefully selected some incredible humanitarian projects. Liz Upton, Director of Communications/my boss, made some tough decisions in the young makers category. Finally, Michael Horne and Tim Richardson of CamJam and Pi Wars fame presided over the Pi robots.

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Hopefully your favourite project made its way into the top 50! It was a hard task whittling it down to this number, and to be perfectly honest we could probably feature another 50 projects next month that are equally good. The Raspberry Pi community has done some incredible things over the last four years and change, and I’m immensely proud that we can share some of the outstanding work you folk have done in this issue.

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But wait, there’s more! As well as our big community celebration, we also have our usual selection of excellent tutorials, news, and reviews. If the reveal of USB and Ethernet booting on Pi 3 piqued your interest a few weeks ago, we have a full eight-page guide on how you can do that yourself. We cover the #10MillionPi event at the Houses of Parliament in the news, along with some wonderful Raspberry Pi-powered tech that’s being used in the health industry.

Also, here’s Mike’s dancing skeleton from the Pi Bakery, in plenty of time for you to get your own spooky version ready for Halloween. We love it.

Danse Macabre

Danse Macabre or Skeleton Dance is a project in the MagPi Magazine No.50 October 2016. It uses the spectrum board from The MagPi No. 46 June 2016 ( https://vimeo.com/167914646 ) , to make one to three skeletons dance to music.

You can grab The MagPi 50 in stores today: it’s in WHSmith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda in the UK, and it will be in Micro Center and selected Barnes & Noble stores when it comes to America. You can also buy the print edition online from our store, and it’s available digitally on our Android and iOS app.

Get a free Pi Zero
Want to make sure you never miss an issue? Subscribe today and get a Pi Zero bundle featuring the new, camera-enabled Pi Zero, and a cable bundle that includes the camera adapter.

Free Pi Zeros and posters: what’s not to love about a MagPi subscription?

Free Creative Commons download
As always, you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the issue page for The MagPi 50.

Don’t forget, though, that like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself, all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals. Help us democratise computing!

We hope you enjoy this issue. We’re off for a cup of tea. See you soon!

The post The 50 greatest Pi projects ever in The MagPi 50 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

A community-made, Arduino-powered interactive town map

via Arduino Blog

MapProject

A group of students from Farmington, Connecticut partnered with artist Balam Soto and master teachers Earl Procko and Jim Corrigan to create a community-based sculpture project that allows people to explore the sights, sounds and history of their town through new media.

The installation runs on Arduino Uno and XBee, and is comprised of two panels which act as viewing screens for multiple visual projections. Visitors can interact with the display and manipulate the images using 24 buttons placed on the physical map. Plus, they are encouraged to record and add their own stories and memories of Farmington to the ever-growing multimedia library.

MapProject03

Permanently exhibited in Farmington’s public library, the Farmington Map Project was also the opportunity to introduce the students to physical computing, digital fabrication, woodworking, Arduino programming, and to the potential that Makerspaces have to offer for bringing ideas to life.

The project was created with the support of an Arts in Education Mini-Grant, funded by the Connecticut State Department of Education, the Department of Economic and Community Development, the Connecticut Office of the Arts, and the Connecticut Association of Schools, Farmington High School’s Fine and Applied Arts.

Interested? Check it out on Hackster.

Vote for the top 20 Raspberry Pi projects in The MagPi!

via Raspberry Pi

Although this Thursday will see the release of issue 49 of The MagPi, we’re already hard at work putting together our 50th issue spectacular. As part of this issue we’re going to be covering 50 of the best Raspberry Pi projects ever and we want you, the community, to vote for the top 20.

Below we have listed the 30 projects that we think represent the best of the best. All we ask is that you vote for your favourite. We will have a few special categories with some other amazing projects in the final article, but if you think we’ve missed out something truly excellent, let us know in the comments. Here’s the list so you can remind yourselves of the projects, with the poll posted at the bottom.

From paper boats to hybrid sports cars

From paper boats to hybrid sports cars

  1. SeeMore – a huge sculpture of 256 Raspberry Pis connected as a cluster
  2. BeetBox – beets (vegetable) you can use to play sick beats (music)
  3. Voyage – 300 paper boats (actually polypropylene) span a river, and you control how they light up
  4. Aquarium – a huge aquarium with Pi-powered weather control simulating the environment of the Cayman Islands
  5. ramanPi – a Raman spectrometer used to identify different types of molecules
  6. Joytone – an electronic musical instrument operated by 72 backlit joysticks
  7. Internet of LEGO – a city of LEGO, connected to and controlled by the internet
  8. McMaster Formula Hybrid – a Raspberry Pi provides telemetry on this hybrid racing car
  9. PiGRRL – Adafruit show us how to make an upgraded, 3D-printed Game Boy
  10. Magic Mirror – check out how you look while getting some at-a-glance info about your day
Dinosaurs, space, and modern art

Dinosaurs, space, and modern art

  1. 4bot – play a game of Connect 4 with a Raspberry Pi robot
  2. Blackgang Chine dinosaurs – these theme park attractions use the diminutive Pi to make them larger than life
  3. Sound Fighter – challenge your friend to the ultimate Street Fight, controlled by pianos
  4. Astro Pi – Raspberry Pis go to space with code written by schoolkids
  5. Pi in the Sky – Raspberry Pis go to near space and send back live images
  6. BrewPi – a microbrewery controlled by a microcomputer
  7. LED Mirror – a sci-fi effect comes to life as you’re represented on a wall of lights
  8. Raspberry Pi VCR – a retro VCR is turned into a pink media-playing machine
  9. #OZWall – Contemporary art in the form of many TVs from throughout the ages
  10. #HiutMusic – you choose the music for a Welsh denim factory through Twitter
Robots and arcade machines make the cut

Robots and arcade machines make the cut

  1. CandyPi – control a jelly bean dispenser from your browser, without the need to twist the dial
  2. Digital Zoetrope – still images rotated to create animation, updated for the 21st century
  3. LifeBox – create virtual life inside this box, and watch it adapt and survive
  4. Coffee Table Pi – classy coffee table by name, arcade cabinet by nature. Tea and Pac-Man, anyone?
  5. Raspberry Pi Notebook – this handheld Raspberry Pi is many people’s dream machine
  6. Pip-Boy 3000A – turn life into a Bethesda RPG with this custom Pip-Boy
  7. Mason Jar Preserve – Mason jars are used to preserve things, so this one is a beautiful backup server to preserve your data
  8. Pi glass – Google Glass may be gone, but you can still make your own amazing Raspberry Pi facsimile
  9. DoodleBorg – a powerful PiBorg robot that can tow a caravan
  10. BigHak – a Big Trak that is truly big: it’s large enough for you to ride in

Now you’ve refreshed your memory of all these amazing projects, it’s time to vote for the one you think is best!

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll.

The vote is running over the next two weeks, and the results will be in The MagPi 50. We’ll see you again on Thursday for the release of the excellent MagPi 49: don’t miss it!

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European Maker Week

via Raspberry Pi

A large part of the Raspberry Pi community identify as makers. We all love to make things – from robots to yarn to pottery to art – and share our creations with others. European Maker Week is a celebration of this rapidly growing community, and it takes place between 30 May and 5 June in 28 countries.

European Maker Week banner: "a celebration of makers and innovators all over Europe"

EMW is an initiative promoted by European Commission and implemented by Maker Faire Rome in collaboration with Startup Europe. Over 80 events are scheduled for the week so there’s plenty to get involved with. And if you’re running a Raspberry Jam that week, you can submit it to the EMW website to be included on the map.

Map showing European Maker Week events in countries across Europe

European Maker Week events

This weekend, Maker Faire UK takes place in Newcastle. Maker Faire Rome, the largest in Europe, takes place in October, and their call for makers opens on 26 April – it’s a great opportunity to show off your latest Raspberry Pi project, or to attend and observe the great hacks on display in the city of Rome. This year a prize of €100,000 is available for the best maker project with the highest social impact.

Banners at the entrance to Maker Faire Rome: "16-18 Ottobre 2015" and "Scopri. Inventa. Crea."

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Maker Faire Rome

There are many ways of connecting with the wider maker community. We strongly encourage you to check out a Maker Faire if you get the chance, and if you’re near a hackspace, a maker space, a fab lab or a repair café, you’ll find people there who are happy to share skills and tools. And, of course, there are Raspberry Jams around the world for you to get involved with too, such Raspberry Jam Berlin, Pi and More in Trier, and Rhône Raspberry Jam. A jam doesn’t have to be a huge event, it can be a small gathering – why not think about setting one up? Head over to our Jam page to find out how to get started!

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