Tag Archives: DIY

DIY Analog resource monitor for your PC

via Dangerous Prototypes

Sasa Karanovic posted detailed instructions of how to build a physical dashboard for your PC, that is available on GitHub:

The overall architecture is very simple; There is a python script that is running on a PC and collects CPU, memory, network and GPU usage. Then, it sends that information over serial COM port to the hardware monitor board for processing. New voltage values are calculated and passed to the digital-to-analog converter (DAC) which drives analog dials (galvanometers) by applying a voltage that will move the needle to a desired location. Super simple but it get’s the job done.

See the full post at sasakaranovic.com.

Check out the video after the break.

The Annoying CAPS LOCK warning buzzer

via Dangerous Prototypes

Glen Akins made a USB notification device that make annoying warning noise when CAPS LOCK is enabled:

The only way to make CAPS LOCK even more annoying was to make it audible! Now never type a password in all upper case, join 500 lines together in vi, or turn a harmless forum post into an ANGRY SCREED without warning again! This project uses a PIC16F1459 to monitor the USB output report containing the CAPS LOCK status from the connected PC. When CAPS LOCK is enabled, the PIC turns on an annoying warning buzzer.

Project details at bikerglen.com, see Part 1 here. All design files are available on github.

Sequence controller

via Dangerous Prototypes

Eric Gunnerson has been working on a sequence controller project:

Yeah. Those pins are beautifully aligned a very precise 0.1” from where they are supposed to be…
Pro tip: Print out your design and put your components on it so that you can check the design.
Meta pro tip: Follow your pro tips.
Anyway, that’s not the only problem; it turns out that the power and LED parts of the connector are right underneath the end of the board, so you can’t use a normal header on them (you could use a right-angle one if you wanted), so I did a new revision of the board with 1.0” rather than 1.1” for the ESP and extended the board so the connectors are out on the end. That’s on the slow ship from China right now.

See the full post on Eric’s Arcana and RiderX blog.

DIY AD9833 signal generator

via Dangerous Prototypes

Daumemo has been working on a DIY signal generator based on an AD9833 IC:

In this post I am going to continue with the DIY signal generator based on the AD9833 IC where I have left in the previous part. Earlier, I have talked how I had built my first analog signal generator’s stage – variable gain amplification circuit. Usually, a generator needs to have an ability to change not only the signal’s amplitude, but also its offset. So, today I will walk you through a circuit which adds an offset to the DIY generator’s output signal.

More details on his blog. See part 1 of this series for the analog signal generator’s stage.

Arduboy with removable flash cart

via Dangerous Prototypes

A homebrew Arduboy with removale flash cart from Facelesstech:

I’ll start with the Arduboy its self. I wanted to make a small Arduboy that anyone with basic soldering skills could make. I don’t think its the easies of boards to solder but its the only way I could make it small enough and have all the features I wanted. I just went with the standard SSH1106 0.96″ screen that most people use in their homemade builds. The buttons I went with are the ones I’ve been using on my other RetroPie builds in the past. They are soft touch but they are not mushy like some are and have a small foot print.

More details on Facelesstech homepage.

Check out the video after the break.

Pogo pins + laser cutter = test fixture

via Dangerous Prototypes

Eric Gunnerson made this DIY pogo-pin test jig:

I decided to build a pogo-pin test jig, and since the approach I came up with was different than the other approaches I’ve seen I thought it would be worth sharing. I’m going to be targeting my laser cutter for fabrication, though I could have chosen to use my 3D printer instead.

See the full post on Eric’s Arcana and RiderX blog.

Check out the video after the break.