Tag Archives: DIY

5V Regulator Cap for 9V battery

via Dangerous Prototypes

Test-leads-supplied-power-by-loops-or-interconnect-wires

David Cook built a 5V regulator to sit atop a 9V battery:

For quick portable projects and temporary hacks, it is often faster to reuse a simple 5V regulator circuit than to integrate a power supply into the device design. My toolbox has an LED tester and magnifier light, so why not add a convenient 5V regulator cap to the collection? There are nicer ones on the market that have surface mount components, but half the fun of an electronics hobby is creating something basic in your own style. This double-decker board with flashing LED power indicator allowed me to experiment with flush battery snaps and board interconnects.

More details at David Cook’s Robot Room project page.

A Solid State QRP Rig from 1955!

via Dangerous Prototypes

pics-Solid State QRP Rig

Pete Juliano, N6QW,  built his own vintage 1955 Solid State QRP Transmitter using the Philco SB-100:

Recently my friend Bill, N2CQR posted data on his blog ~ soldersmoke.blogspot.com about a vintage late 1950’s early 1960’s 10 milliwatt 10 Meter transmitter. That was quite a feat!
But given my Italian heritage I could not let that pass without building my own solid state transmitter using a transistor from 1955. My rig operates on 14.060 and produces 0.4 milliwatts with a 3 volt collector supply using a Germanium transistor from Philco. The SB-100 was one of the first RF transistors that could work all the way past the 10 Meter band. The max Pout was 10 milliwatts –so mine is just loafing along.

More details at N6QW Homebrew Radio blog.

Check out the video after the break.

 

Simple 3 phase Arduino energy meter

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Simple 3 Phase Arduino energy meter from The DIY Life:

Again, with this meter I was going for simplicity. Sure, for perfectly accurate measurements you need to measure both the supply current and voltage but for this application and in the interests of keeping the energy meter simple and safe – only requiring a non-contact connection to your mains – I’ve decide to stick with a simple current measurement which gives you an estimate to within a couple of decimal points of a kilowatt hour.
This meter measures the supply current through each phase using a CT (current transformer) and then does a few calculations to give you the current, power, maximum power and kilowatt hours consumed for each phase.

Project info at The DIY Life homepage.

Check out the video after the break.

M2 by Macchina joins At Heart!

via Arduino Blog

M2 by Macchina

We’re excited to announce the latest member of Arduino’s AtHeart program. M2 by Macchinanow live on Kickstarter–is an open-source, versatile development platform for hacking and customizing cars.

M2’s design is compact, modular, wirelessly connectable, and built on the popular Arduino Due. The device can be wired under the hood for a more permanent installation or plugged into the OBD2 port, enabling you to do virtually anything with your vehicle’s software. 

Macchina, a Minnesota-based company, has partnered with Arduino, Digi and Digi-Key to develop M2, and believes that its highly-adaptable hardware will most benefit hot rodders, mechanics, students, security researchers, and entrepreneurs by providing them access to the inner workings of their rides.

M2 accommodates a wide variety of wireless options thanks to its Digi XBee form-factor socket, allowing you to easily connect your car to the Internet, smartphone, satellites, or the cloud using BLE, WiFi, GSM, LTE, and other modules.

The platform can be programmed using the latest Arduino IDE, and is compatible with a number of software packages. Moreover, given its open-source nature, potential applications are bounded only by the collective imagination of the coding community.

Interested? Check out Macchina’s Kickstarter page to learn more or pre-order your M2 today!

DIY laser scanning microscope

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Venkes shared detailed instructions of how to make a DIY Laser Scanning Microscope (LSM):

The reason I was thinking of a DVD pick-up is that it houses a laser and a lens capable of projecting a spot of visible laser light small enough to “see” a bit on a DVD. And those bits are very small (320nm)! Furthermore it houses coils to steere the lens (sideways and up and down) and a detection part. This steering is necessary to be able of following the microscopic narrow tracks on a CD or DVD while spinning (sideways moving of the lens) and follow height differences while spinning (up and douwn movement of the lens). You can imagine that folowing the track must be very precise considdering the turning speed and the bit size! These characteristics are exactly what we need!

Project instructables here.

Check out the video after the break.