Tag Archives: Electronics

Getting ready for CES in Las Vegas

via Arduino Blog

Arduino At CES 2014

 

CES  (Consumer Electronics Show) is the exhibition showcasing the latest in consumer technology since 1967 and  hosting previews of products and new product announcements by the most important companies in the industry.

If you want to find Arduino at CES, come and visit us at the Atmel booth (see map ) from 7th to 10th of January 2014.

CES 2014

 

 

MinnowBoard Raises the Bar on Embedded Computing

via MAKE » Tag: open source hardware

minnowboardMinnowboard is a new Open Source microcontroller board that is going after the Raspberry Pi market not by emulating the popular RasPi, but by blowing it out of the water with a four-inch $200 mini PC running Ångström Linux on an Intel Atom CPU.

Read more on MAKE

Testing Batteries for Sulfation

via MAKE » Tag: open source hardware

dapimp-0Uber-maker Mikey Sklar demonstrates how to charge, test, and recover a sealed 12V lead-acid battery from the dumpster, using his Power In My Pocket open source kit. Filed under: Electronics

Read more on MAKE

Announcing the Arno Kit, an Arduino-compatible “Beginner Kit on a Board”

via MAKE » Category: Open source hardware

Arno V1Kevin and Peter Gould from Olympia Circuits started selling their own Arduino-compatible LeOlympia development boards at the various Maker Faires. In the course of demoing and talking to people they recognized the need for something even simpler to get people into the world of programming microcontrollers. The result is the [...]

Read the full article on MAKE

Phoebe is hinting that she wants some LEDs

via Raspberry Pi

Meltwater, who you may know from our forums or from the MagPi, where he’s a regular contributor, has been introducing Phoebe, who celebrates her sixth birthday in February, to electronics engineering. He says:

I’ve been working on producing a RGB LED module to use with the Raspberry Pi, since the bright colours and being able to control something so instant is ideal for playing with. I’m using GPIO, LEDs and Scratch being on the to do list (motors to follow).

 

Anyway, I was writing some notes out for it and Phoebe wanted to help, so she copied the entire page, asking about what each part was (this is before I’ve even shown her the LEDs switched on).  She also drew me a diagram of the circuit they did the other week at school, a “battery”, “tough long wires” and “light bulb” (I think I might have to offer an afternoon there at some point, but is only 1st year).

 

Meltwater attached some photos to the email, and I thought they deserved sharing. Our suspicion is that Phoebe really, really wants some LEDs, and this is a subtle way of getting the message across.

Meltwater’s original notebook scribblings (click to embiggen)…

…and Phoebe’s remarkably faithful copy. A father/daughter trip to the electronics shop for LEDs is coming up this week. Phoebe has said she wants pink ones. (Click to enlarge)

Careers day at Phoebe’s school is going to be a hoot.

I will leave you with Phoebe’s robot; she’s been doing some paper prototyping with Dad. What have you been doing with your kids over the holiday? Mail me if you’ve got something you’d like to share; we love looking at your kids’ projects!

Phoebe’s robot. She says that next she wants to go to the metal shop (B&Q) for parts.

 

Limor Fried Named Entrepreneur of the Year

via MAKE » Category: Open source hardware

limor-fried-adafruit-entrepreneur-of-the-yearEntrepreneur magazine has named Adafruit‘s founder and lead engineer, Limor “Ladyada” Fried, as the Entrepreneur of 2012. A tireless proponent of the open source movement, Limor started Adafruit in her dorm room at MIT in 2005. Today, Adafruit is housed in a 12,000-square-foot industrial space in the SoHo neighborhood of New [...]

Read the full article on MAKE

iPacemaker with Arduino

via Arduino Blog

When we say “there are no limit for  Arduino”, here we have a project,  sent by [ladvine] in wich Arduino meets biomedic tech. The WiFi shield is the real application when they speak about Arduino. There is a long paper about it on this [website] that I suggest to visit to understand more this important project.

iPacemaker is an reprogrammable implant pacemaker with wireless connectivity.
A user friendly embedded web interface helps in changing every parameters of the implantable pacemaker. The important feature is the WiFi alliance complaint hardware which supports every wireless device to establish connection with the IMD. GSM connectivity can be used in absence of WiFi in remote areas helping in Telemetry.
Wireless protection in case of WiFi is enabled through WPA2 security with AES Encryption and Java Web interface which has inherent security capabilities. Shielding the GSM and WiFi antennas helps reduce unwanted patient radiations.

Updated Pulse Sensors in the Maker Shed

via MAKE » Category: Open source hardware

MKPLS1-2The Pulse Sensor is a great way to incorporate biofeedback into your projects. This upgraded version adds amplification and noise reduction allowing for faster, more reliable heartbeat readings.

Read the full article on MAKE

Radio (HPSDR)

via OSHUG

Radio spectrum is a finite resource and it should therefore come as no surprise that radio systems are a particularly hot area of research. Whilst ever more advanced schemes for modulation, digital encoding and spectrum access promise increased efficiency, step upgrades more often than not require new hardware. As has been evidenced in the evolution of mobile telephony from analogue to GSM and 2.5G (GPRS) to 3G, and similarly in the evolution of wireless computer networks. A disruptive development in radio technology promises to change this and to bring an unprecedented flexibility to radio systems, and one similar to that which programming brought to the task of machine computation. Despite, or perhaps due to being at the cutting edge there are a number of open source hardware projects concerned with developing software-defined radio (SDR) technology. As with the earliest developments in radio systems radio amateurs are once again at the forefront, and at this month's meeting we will have a presentation on the comprehensive HPSDR platform.

HPSDR - High Performance Software Defined Radio

HPSDR is an open source (GNU type) hardware and software project intended as the "next generation" software-defined radio for radio amateurs and shortwave listeners. It is being developed by a group of software-defined radio enthusiasts around the world, and in a modular hardware fashion to help promote experimentation by both hardware and software developers.

John Melton has held an amateur radio license since 1984 when he was first licensed as N6LYT while living and working in California, and he was assigned the UK callsign of G0ORX on moving back to the UK. He became interested in developing open source software in 1990 with the launch of AMSAT Oscar 16, an amateur radio satellite with a store and forward messaging payload. He developed an open source software package to communicate with the satellite that ran on Linux (pre 1.0) and subsequently wrote an open source fully automated satellite ground station software package in Java. John has been a software engineer since 1970 when he was employed by Burroughs Corporation, and for the last 14 years he has worked for Sun Microsystems who were acquired by Oracle this year.

slides [PDF]

Open Discussion - Ideas for Future Meetings

Themes, speakers, venues - it's all up for grabs! Have your say and help shape future OSHUG meetings. Offer to present, suggest a speaker or sit quietly until it's time to cross the road to the pub...

Radio (HPSDR)

via OSHUG

Radio spectrum is a finite resource and it should therefore come as no surprise that radio systems are a particularly hot area of research. Whilst ever more advanced schemes for modulation, digital encoding and spectrum access promise increased efficiency, step upgrades more often than not require new hardware. As has been evidenced in the evolution of mobile telephony from analogue to GSM and 2.5G (GPRS) to 3G, and similarly in the evolution of wireless computer networks. A disruptive development in radio technology promises to change this and to bring an unprecedented flexibility to radio systems, and one similar to that which programming brought to the task of machine computation. Despite, or perhaps due to being at the cutting edge there are a number of open source hardware projects concerned with developing software-defined radio (SDR) technology. As with the earliest developments in radio systems radio amateurs are once again at the forefront, and at this month's meeting we will have a presentation on the comprehensive HPSDR platform.

HPSDR - High Performance Software Defined Radio

HPSDR is an open source (GNU type) hardware and software project intended as the "next generation" software-defined radio for radio amateurs and shortwave listeners. It is being developed by a group of software-defined radio enthusiasts around the world, and in a modular hardware fashion to help promote experimentation by both hardware and software developers.

John Melton has held an amateur radio license since 1984 when he was first licensed as N6LYT while living and working in California, and he was assigned the UK callsign of G0ORX on moving back to the UK. He became interested in developing open source software in 1990 with the launch of AMSAT Oscar 16, an amateur radio satellite with a store and forward messaging payload. He developed an open source software package to communicate with the satellite that ran on Linux (pre 1.0) and subsequently wrote an open source fully automated satellite ground station software package in Java. John has been a software engineer since 1970 when he was employed by Burroughs Corporation, and for the last 14 years he has worked for Sun Microsystems who were acquired by Oracle this year.

slides [PDF]

Open Discussion - Ideas for Future Meetings

Themes, speakers, venues - it's all up for grabs! Have your say and help shape future OSHUG meetings. Offer to present, suggest a speaker or sit quietly until it's time to cross the road to the pub...

Arduino: An Open Source Hardware Success Story

via OSHUG

For the third meeting we'll be asking the question "what factors contribute to the success of an open source hardware project?", and using Arduino and derivatives LilyPad Arduino and the concurrency.cc board as the basis for an informal case study

Current Cost Bridge - an Arduino based, hackable consumer device

The Current Cost Bridge was developed using the open-source Arduino platform. The reason for using Arduino, was to speed up the development process of the bridge, allowing for fast prototyping and producing a hackable device

Chris Dalby (twitter) is Lead Software Developer at Current Cost Ltd with over 10 years experience in software development and network infrastructure. Chris joined Current Cost in December 2009 to develop desktop and web based software for the Current Cost monitor range.

Chris Dalby and Paul Downey talking about the Current Cost Bridge from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Concurrency.cc - parallel programming for makers and artists

The concurrency.cc project describes itself as "a group of educators and researchers exploring the development of tools that make parallel programming more accessible to more people. Our hope is that concurrency.cc will serve the community of developers surrounding parallel and concurrent languages on the Arduino and other low-cost embedded platforms."

Adam Sampson is a research associate in the field of concurrent programming and complex systems simulation at the University of Kent. He has enjoyed electronics as a hobby ever since being told off for dismantling the family vacuum cleaner as a small child.

Omer Kilic (twitter) is a research student at the University of Kent working on dynamically reconfigurable architectures and embedded systems. He is passionate about the open-source hardware movement and likes tinkering, so much so that he founded TinkerSoc, The University of Kent Tinkering Society

Adam Sampson demonstrates a pair of concurrencyCC devices running an Occam driven LED display from Paul Downey on flickr

Adam Sampson and Omer Kilic talking with Dj Walker-Morgan after #oshug from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

LilyPad - an Arduino based platform for wearables and e-textiles

The LilyPad Arduino is a microcontroller, plus a set of sewable electronic components designed so they can be put together to create interactive wearables or textiles based artworks. There is quite a range of components such as LEDS, sensors, buzzer, accelerometer and more that can be connected with conductive thread. The board is based on the ATmega168V/328Vand was designed and developed by Leah Buechley and SparkFun Electronics.

Rain Ashford (twitter) is Senior Producer at BBC Learning where she is presently across the BBC's Media Literacy supertopic portal. During her 10 years at the BBC she has developed and produced many of the BBC's high priority sites and online activities. Passionate about technology, she recently started a Women in Technology network for her colleagues to discuss careers, training, raising their profile and encouraging women to look at careers in tech. She previously worked for BBC R&D as a Technologist where she worked on the groundbreaking R&DTV project and the BBC's developer network, BBC Backstage, she's a hardware hacker, coder, artist, gamer and blogger.

Rain Ashford talking about Arduino and open source hardware from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Arduino: An Open Source Hardware Success Story

via OSHUG

For the third meeting we'll be asking the question "what factors contribute to the success of an open source hardware project?", and using Arduino and derivatives LilyPad Arduino and the concurrency.cc board as the basis for an informal case study

Current Cost Bridge - an Arduino based, hackable consumer device

The Current Cost Bridge was developed using the open-source Arduino platform. The reason for using Arduino, was to speed up the development process of the bridge, allowing for fast prototyping and producing a hackable device

Chris Dalby (twitter) is Lead Software Developer at Current Cost Ltd with over 10 years experience in software development and network infrastructure. Chris joined Current Cost in December 2009 to develop desktop and web based software for the Current Cost monitor range.

Chris Dalby and Paul Downey talking about the Current Cost Bridge from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Concurrency.cc - parallel programming for makers and artists

The concurrency.cc project describes itself as "a group of educators and researchers exploring the development of tools that make parallel programming more accessible to more people. Our hope is that concurrency.cc will serve the community of developers surrounding parallel and concurrent languages on the Arduino and other low-cost embedded platforms."

Adam Sampson is a research associate in the field of concurrent programming and complex systems simulation at the University of Kent. He has enjoyed electronics as a hobby ever since being told off for dismantling the family vacuum cleaner as a small child.

Omer Kilic (twitter) is a research student at the University of Kent working on dynamically reconfigurable architectures and embedded systems. He is passionate about the open-source hardware movement and likes tinkering, so much so that he founded TinkerSoc, The University of Kent Tinkering Society

Adam Sampson demonstrates a pair of concurrencyCC devices running an Occam driven LED display from Paul Downey on flickr

Adam Sampson and Omer Kilic talking with Dj Walker-Morgan after #oshug from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

LilyPad - an Arduino based platform for wearables and e-textiles

The LilyPad Arduino is a microcontroller, plus a set of sewable electronic components designed so they can be put together to create interactive wearables or textiles based artworks. There is quite a range of components such as LEDS, sensors, buzzer, accelerometer and more that can be connected with conductive thread. The board is based on the ATmega168V/328Vand was designed and developed by Leah Buechley and SparkFun Electronics.

Rain Ashford (twitter) is Senior Producer at BBC Learning where she is presently across the BBC's Media Literacy supertopic portal. During her 10 years at the BBC she has developed and produced many of the BBC's high priority sites and online activities. Passionate about technology, she recently started a Women in Technology network for her colleagues to discuss careers, training, raising their profile and encouraging women to look at careers in tech. She previously worked for BBC R&D as a Technologist where she worked on the groundbreaking R&DTV project and the BBC's developer network, BBC Backstage, she's a hardware hacker, coder, artist, gamer and blogger.

Rain Ashford talking about Arduino and open source hardware from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Open Hardware Licensing and Models for Sustainability

via OSHUG

For our second meeting we've presentations from Andrew Katz on licensing Open Source Hardware projects and a representative from Pay It Forward on Altruistic 3D printing using RepRap.

Free and open source software is mainstream. Free and open hardware isn't.

Andrew is increasingly involved in open hardware, and considers what, if anything, is different about hardware which makes open projects a challenge, and whether it is possible to construct a licence, like the GPL, which has a copyleft element applicable to hardware.

Andrew Katz is a partner at Moorcrofts LLP, a boutique law firm in England's Thames Valley and advises a wide range of businesses on free and open source related issues. He has lectured and published widely on the subject and is a founder editor of the International Free and Open Source Software Law Review. Before becoming a solicitor, he trained as a barrister, and moonlighted as a programmer during his studies at Bar School, programming in Turbo Pascal. He has released software under the GPL.

Copy Left Licensing & Hardware, Andrew Katz from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Andrew Back talking with Andrew Katz of Moorcrofts LLP from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Pay It Forward — Alturistic 3D Printing

Pay It Forward is a movement to bootstrap the thingiverse using RepStrap machines to print parts to help other people get started with RepRap machines.

Paul Downey chatting OSHUG with David Flanders from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Open Hardware Licensing and Models for Sustainability

via OSHUG

For our second meeting we've presentations from Andrew Katz on licensing Open Source Hardware projects and a representative from Pay It Forward on Altruistic 3D printing using RepRap.

Free and open source software is mainstream. Free and open hardware isn't.

Andrew is increasingly involved in open hardware, and considers what, if anything, is different about hardware which makes open projects a challenge, and whether it is possible to construct a licence, like the GPL, which has a copyleft element applicable to hardware.

Andrew Katz is a partner at Moorcrofts LLP, a boutique law firm in England's Thames Valley and advises a wide range of businesses on free and open source related issues. He has lectured and published widely on the subject and is a founder editor of the International Free and Open Source Software Law Review. Before becoming a solicitor, he trained as a barrister, and moonlighted as a programmer during his studies at Bar School, programming in Turbo Pascal. He has released software under the GPL.

Copy Left Licensing & Hardware, Andrew Katz from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Andrew Back talking with Andrew Katz of Moorcrofts LLP from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Pay It Forward — Alturistic 3D Printing

Pay It Forward is a movement to bootstrap the thingiverse using RepStrap machines to print parts to help other people get started with RepRap machines.

Paul Downey chatting OSHUG with David Flanders from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

An introduction to the XMOS XCore XS1 and Amino

via OSHUG

For the inaugural event we are fortunate to have presentations from Prof. David May FRS, CTO of XMOS Semiconductor, and Alan Wood of Folknology Labs.

XMOS XCore XS1

XMOS is a fabless semiconductor company that develops multi-core multi-threaded processors designed to execute several real-time tasks, DSP, and control flow all at once. XMOS coined the term software-defined silicon, and this can be seen as midway between FPGA and MCU. However, unlike an FPGA there is no requirement for a complex HDL toolchain, and C and C++ can be employed in development, with XMOS extensions to C for concurrency (XC).

David May will be known to many as architect of the transputer and author of the concurrent programming language, occam. As co-founder and chief technical officer of XMOS Semiconductor, he will be presenting an introduction to the XCore XS1 microprocessor architecture and the associated development environment.

Open Source Hardware User Group - Prof. David May, XMOS from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Amino

Amino (Folknology Labs) is a networked creator tool for hardware and software production. XMOS software-defined silicon technology serves to blur the line between software and hardware, and Amino uses this technology to further blur the line between prototyping and production. Amino is also Internet native, event driven and optimised for concurrency, and may be seen as a building block for networked open source hardware creation.

Alan Wood - a.k.a. Folknology — originally trained in systems engineering, got lost in software engineering and open source for a decade, before returning back to his hardware roots via the open source hardware and makers movement that has gathered momentum over the last few years.

Al's interest lay in pushing the envelope for open source hardware/software production and agility: "We are approaching a tipping point where open source and open creation physically changes the real world not just the virtual world. With Amino we are selling a creative tool, not a finished product. We are selling possibilities. The participant decides what runs on it, not us. We just give them as much as we can to help them through that process."