Tag Archives: Hacks

Feather M0 express supersizing

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Dastels writes, “In my last post I described how I hacked a 2Mbyte SPI flash onto a Trinket M0 to give it the memory space for CircutiPython of one of the M0 Express boards. This time I supersized an M0 Express board, specifically a Feather M0 Express, although the same hack should work on a Circuit Playground Express.”

More details at Curmudgeoclast site.

Vintage MIDI: Roland MT-32, Roland SC-55, HardMPU, and an Xi 8088

via Dangerous Prototypes

Dr. Scott Baker writes:

In this video, I decided to upgrade my home built PC from AdLib sound to MIDI. I tried out a couple different midi modules, the Roland MT-32 and the Roland SC-55. I learned that I’d need an MPU-401 or compatible ISA interface, and I explored the alternatives, eventually settling on the HardMPU by Ab0tj. Using the HardMPU schematic, I built a board, programmed the microcontroller, and tried out Vintage games on my Xi 8088. I also wrote my own Midi player to play .MID files using MPU-401 intelligent mode.

See the full post on his blog.

Modifying a computer ATX power supply for higher output voltage

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Kerry Wong wrote a post on his blog showing how he modified the 12V rail of a TL494 based ATX power supply to 14.6V for 4S LiFePO4 battery charging:

To charge the 110Ah battery bank I built, I need a power supply that can provide at least 10A at 14.6V. Since I have many old ATX power supplies lying around and the 12V rails of these power supplies are more than capable of providing 10A, I decided to modify one such power supply for using as a 4S LiFePO4 battery charger.

More details at his blog here.

Check out the video after the break.

TS100 oscilloscope hack

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Befinitiv wrote an article describing his modification to turn a TS100 soldering iron into an oscilloscope:

As you can see in the video, you can use the soldering tip as your measurement probe. Coincidentally, a soldering iron has already a pretty good form factor for an oscilloscope. Here is a still picture of a UART waveform

See the full post on his blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Halogen floodlight SMT reflow

via Dangerous Prototypes

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David Sanz Kirbis built his own reflow device with an halogen floodlight, that is available on Github:

First test was to check the speed of the temperature rise inside a standard halogen floodlight. Reflow soldering temperature curves are quite demanding, and some adapted ovens can’t reach the degrees-per-second speed of the ramp-up stages of these curves.
I bought the spotlight, put an aluminium sheet covering the inside surface of the protective glass (to reduce heat loss), and measured the temperature rise with a multimeter’s thermometer…. and wow! More than 5ºC/s… and I better turned the thing off after reaching 300ºC and still rising quickly.
So the floodlight was able to fulfill the needs.
Next step was a temperature controller, that is, the device that keeps the temperature as in a specified reflow curve profile in each moment.

See the full post and more details on his blog, TheRandomLab.

Check out the video after the break.