Tag Archives: how-to

How to: STM32F103C8T6 as an USB device (Virtual serial port / CDC)

via Dangerous Prototypes

In this video Hugatry shared detailed instructions of how to use the STM32F103C8T6 as an USB device with virtual serial port:

Cheap STM32F103C8T6 development board
Blue STM32F103C8T6 development boards, also known as “BluePill”, are cheap way to get started with 32bit ARM microcontrollers. The STM32 development board can sometimes be bought for less than $2 and ST-LinkV2 compatible programmer and debugger doesn’t cost much more than that either.
The STM32F103C8T6 has nice amount of flash and RAM, runs at 72MHz and best of all: It has built-in USB. It is possible to program these STM32 boards to act as an USB devices, without “FTDI chip”. In this post and in the embedded video I will teach step by step how to use the STM32F103C8T6 as an USB device, in particular a virtual serial port.

More details at Hugatry’s HackVlog.

Display Arduino analog input using LabVIEW

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Zx Lee shared detailed instructions of how to display the Arduino measurements using LabVIEW:

To get started, I will explain what is actually going on in Arduino. In this project, I am using an Arduino Nano to acquire signals and send the data to PC. As mentioned earlier, two analog input channels (A0 & A1) will be used to measure input signals. To ensure an accurate measurement is performed at fixed sample rate, the Arduino is configured to wait the predefined interval before taking a measurement and send to PC serially. The concept used is similar to the BlinkWithoutDelay example in Arduino. The benefit of using this method is that there is a while loop that always checks if it has crossed the desired interval. If it is reached, it will take the measurement, else it will skip and you can make it to work on other task.

More details at his blog here.

Panelization – using GerberPanelizer on Windows (Linux possible)

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Arsenijs over at Hackaday.io writes:

This tutorial was done on Windows. Authors claim it could also be used on Linux by using Mono, but I haven’t tried and don’t understand a lot about Mono to see what could be done. I am switching to Linux nowadays, so I’d be very grateful to anybody that’d make instructions on how to launch it, however – and I’m sure other fellow Linux-wielding engineers will be grateful, too =)
This is the GitHub issue describing steps to launch it on Linux, half-successfully (thanks to @jlbrian7 for figuring this out

More details at Hackaday.io project page.

Thanks Scrubis! Via the contact form.

3D POV display

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Gelstronic shared detailed instructions of how to build this 3D POV display, project instructables here:

In my project i use a spinning helix of LED strips. There are a total of 144 LEDs that can displays 17280 voxels with 16 colors. The voxels are arranged circularly in 12 levels. The LEDs are controlled by only one microcontroller. Because i have used the APA102 LEDs i need no additional drivers or transistors. So the electronic part is easier to build. Another advantage is the wireless electrical supply. You need no brushes and there is no friction loss.

Check out the video after the break.

Build an open source laser reflection barrier

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Boris Landoni from Open Electronics writes about an open source project laser reflection barrier:

It allows us to detect the presence and passage of an object thanks to the combination of a laser diode which emits a light ray and a phototransistor which detects reflected light.

Robotics applications and industrial control systems normally make use of optical systems in order to detect proximity and passing of objects, taking advantage of light interruption or light reflection on a surface of the object to be detected. In this article, we want to show you the project of a laser barrier: however this is not an interruption-type barrier, which needs the object to be detected to pass through a meter and a photodetector, in fact, this is a reflection barrier: in our circuit, a laser projects a ray of focused and infinitely-collimated light and any object passing in front of it will reflect a portion of it, which will be intercepted by a lens on its way back and focused on the sensible surface of a photo-sensible component.

Full details at Open Electronics project page.

Build your very own drink mixing robot

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Yu Jiang Tham designed and built his own bartender robot named Bar Mixvah, that is available on Github:

I built a robot that mixes drinks named Bar Mixvah.  It utilizes an Arduino microcontroller switching a series of pumps via transistors on the physical layer, and the MEAN stack (MongoDB, Express.js, Angular.js, Node.js) and jQuery for the frontend and backend.  In this post, I’ll teach you how I made it.  You can follow along and build one just like it!

Check out Yu Jiang’s 3-part blog post here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3.