Tag Archives: how-to

3D POV display

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Gelstronic shared detailed instructions of how to build this 3D POV display, project instructables here:

In my project i use a spinning helix of LED strips. There are a total of 144 LEDs that can displays 17280 voxels with 16 colors. The voxels are arranged circularly in 12 levels. The LEDs are controlled by only one microcontroller. Because i have used the APA102 LEDs i need no additional drivers or transistors. So the electronic part is easier to build. Another advantage is the wireless electrical supply. You need no brushes and there is no friction loss.

Check out the video after the break.

Build an open source laser reflection barrier

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Boris Landoni from Open Electronics writes about an open source project laser reflection barrier:

It allows us to detect the presence and passage of an object thanks to the combination of a laser diode which emits a light ray and a phototransistor which detects reflected light.

Robotics applications and industrial control systems normally make use of optical systems in order to detect proximity and passing of objects, taking advantage of light interruption or light reflection on a surface of the object to be detected. In this article, we want to show you the project of a laser barrier: however this is not an interruption-type barrier, which needs the object to be detected to pass through a meter and a photodetector, in fact, this is a reflection barrier: in our circuit, a laser projects a ray of focused and infinitely-collimated light and any object passing in front of it will reflect a portion of it, which will be intercepted by a lens on its way back and focused on the sensible surface of a photo-sensible component.

Full details at Open Electronics project page.

Build your very own drink mixing robot

via Dangerous Prototypes

Yu Jiang Tham designed and built his own bartender robot named Bar Mixvah, that is available on Github:

I built a robot that mixes drinks named Bar Mixvah.  It utilizes an Arduino microcontroller switching a series of pumps via transistors on the physical layer, and the MEAN stack (MongoDB, Express.js, Angular.js, Node.js) and jQuery for the frontend and backend.  In this post, I’ll teach you how I made it.  You can follow along and build one just like it!

Check out Yu Jiang’s 3-part blog post here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3.

Pool playing robot

via Dangerous Prototypes

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BVarv  wrote an instructable detailing the build of his pool playing robot project with Arduino:

I redesign the prototype with servos, belts and gears at the points of rotation to add programmable motion.
While doing so, I stumble across an easy win. It turns out that the “parked under the table” orientations, and the “perpendicular to the table” orientations are regular stops for pool playing robots. Adding two tabs to a layer of the table pedestal and placing two switches on the motion platform is a simple way to reliably detect those positions.

Project instructables here.

Check out the video after the break.

DIY polarity Led tweezers

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Jesus Echavarria shared detailed instructions of how to make a simple tweezers for checking led polarity:

I usually assemble by hand all the boards I make. I use SMD components, especially in 0805 format for resistors, capacitors and leds. With the last ones, I always have the same problem: I need to check the polarity of it, to ensure that I assemble on the right way. To do it, I need the multimeter, select the diode position and test the led’s for the right polarity. Because on the assembly process I don’t usually the multimeter, why don’t make a tweezers to test the led’s? It’s an easy and very cheap project, and you’ll have a usefull tool when assembly boards. Here’s the result, after a couple of hours working on it ;).

More details at Jesus Echavarria’s blog.

PogoPlug Hacking: A Step by Step Guide to Owning The Device

via hardware – Hackaday

[Films By Kris Hardware] has started quite an interesting YouTube series on hacking and owning a PogoPlug Mobile v4. While this has been done many times in the past, he gives a great step by step tutorial. The series so far is quite impressive, going into great detail on how to gain root access to the device through serial a serial connection.

PogoPlugs are remote-access devices sporting ARM processor running at 800 MHz, which is supported by the Linux Kernel.  The version in question (PogoPlug Mobile v4) have been re-purposed in the past for things like an inexpensive PBX, an OpenWrt router and even a squeezebox replacement. Even if you don’t have a PogoPlug, this could be a great introduction to hacking any Linux-based consumer device.

So far, we’re at part three of what will be an eight-part series, so there’s going to be more to learn if you follow along. His videos have already covered how to connect via a serial port to the device, how to send commands, set the device up, and stop it calling home. This will enable the budding hacker to make the PogoPlug do their bidding. In this age of the cheap single-board Linux computer, hacking this type of device may be going out of style, but the skills you learn here probably won’t any time soon.


Filed under: hardware, how-to