Tag Archives: Led(s)

Programming an 8 digit 7-segment display, the easy way, using a Max7219

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Allan Schwartz shows off the easy way to interface 7-segment displays using the MAX7219:

Previously, in part 1 of my blog posting Programming a 7-segment Display, using just Arduino digital pins (the hard way) we had demonstrated how to hook up a pair of 7-segment displays to an Arduino, treating each individual segment as a separate LED. There was a bit of tricky logic to translate each digit into the segments A, B, C, D, E, F, G plus additional logic to turn the digital pins on or off. Although I tried to code it as efficiently as possible, the logic may have been difficult to understand.
Also, constructing the project was fairly tedious, with dozens of resistors and hook-up wires.
Instead, lets do this the easy way. A typical MAX7219 module comprised of a single MAX7219 chip and eight 7-segment displays.

More details at www.whatimade.today.

Dot² isn’t your typical coffee table

via Arduino Blog

Coffee tables are useful for putting coffee, food, or perhaps way too much junk on, but it’s 2017—we can do better than that! Akshay Baweja certainly has at least with Dot², an interactive piece of furniture that can run animations, display lighting effects, and play old-school games.

The Arduino Mega-based table features a matrix of 296 LEDs that shine up through sections of diffused acrylic, and uses a grid of foam board strips to keep each light in a square. Dot² can be controlled either by a PC running GLEDIATOR software, or via a smartphone using a Bluetooth connection and its own custom app.

The outside doesn’t look too shabby either. With an interesting wood pattern on the side, even when off it seems like there could be something more lurking just below the table’s glass!

Want to build one of your own? Head over to this incredible project’s Instructables page to get started. And, if you’d like to know more about how it’s controlled, check out Baweja’s app here or GLEDIATOR’s site for the computer software he used.

Interactive geodesic LED dome = Extreme geometric fun!

via Arduino Blog

We’ve all seen geodesic domes in one form or another, whether as a modern experiment, as housing from a bygone era, or perhaps as a gigantic structure in Orlando (technically a geodesic sphere). Jon Bumstead apparently wasn’t satisfied with current dome options, and instead created his own, integrating elements from programmable LED tables to make it interactive.

The resulting build is quite spectacular. Each triangular section able to be lit up with an RGB LED, and further information is output to five MIDI signals in order to produce sound. This means that up to five people can play the dome as an instrument simultaneously. If that wasn’t enough, the Arduino Uno-based dome is programmed to play a version of Simon or Pong, and can be set up to display a light show!

I constructed a geodesic dome consisting of 120 triangles with an LED and sensor at each triangle. Each LED can be addressed individually and each sensor is tuned specifically for a single triangle. The dome is programmed with an Arduino to light up and produce a MIDI signal depending on which triangle you place your hand.

Pretty cool, right? Head over to the project’s Instructables page to see more, or if you’d like information on constructing the dome itself, check out Domerama.

Build your own Death Star…sort of

via Raspberry Pi

Why it’s taken me seven months to type ‘Star Wars Raspberry Pi’ into Google is beyond me. But this morning, as I sat on a bus in traffic with BB8 in my bag and memories of watching Rogue One last night, the thought finally came to me.

Cut to a few moments later, as I eagerly scrolled through the Interactive Persistence of Vision Globe website from the School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering team at the University of Leeds.

POV Globe Death Star

The project was originally launched a few years back by a MEng student group consisting of Thomas Carpenter, Oliver Peel, Adam Clarkson, and Laurence Bird, with supervision from Craig Evans. It uses a ring of RGB LEDs, rotating on an axis at 300rpm, to display an image.

POV Globe

A Raspberry Pi sits within the rotating build, offering HDMI connectivity to allow images to be sent to the LEDs via a decoder.

Images can be sent to the globe from any smart device, allowing you to display a map with your own chosen coordinates, visual temperature readings, and much more. This makes the globe useful for marketing and education, as well as good ol’ fashioned fun and total planet destruction.

A Spherical Persistence of Vision Display – 3rd year project

Warning – contains flashing images* Students from the School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering create a Spherical Persistence of Vision Display in their 3rd year group project.

The team go into a lot more detail on their website, explaining the components used and how the globe was built. If you’re interested in the ins and outs, head to their site.

Given it’s been a few years since the launch of the globe, we’d love to hear what its builders are up to now. If you know, leave an update in the comments below.

The post Build your own Death Star…sort of appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Comfort Thermometer display built with 517 individual LEDs

via Dangerous Prototypes

Richard wrote in to tell us about a ‘Comfort Thermometer display built with 517 LEDs’ that he has just finished building:

Comfort Thermometer Display built with 517 individual LEDs and the following microprocessors:
1) PiC24FV16KA301 – controlling outer 36 RGB LEDs
2) PIC16F886 – bargraph and pink LEDs animations
3) ATmega328 – controlling 7-segment display
4) PIC16F57 – rf transmitter and receiver

The bargraph LEDs are current sinked with LM3914 LED display drivers, and current sourced via the PIC16F886 and transistors

Via the contact form.

Control this Ohio home’s Christmas lights from the Internet

via Arduino Blog

If you don’t want to bother putting up your own lights this year, you can just control Tom Hammond’s!

As seen on Good Morning America, Hammond recently put up a Christmas display that can be controlled via a simple online interface between the hours of 5pm and midnight (EST). The setup consists of an Arduino Mega along with a Raspberry Pi running Falcon Player, while the animations were created using xLights.

The website offers nine lighting options that anyone can select and play. Thanks to a webcam on Hammond’s property, the page even features a live stream that lets users see the animation they chose in real-time. However, due to the number of people trying to access it, the video is not always available.

Hammond, who lives in Akron, Ohio, told ABC News:

“I wanted people outside of my community to enjoy it. The nicest thing I got was an email from an older lady who lives with her mother who said they couldn’t decorate their house this year and she showed her mom my website and said that was one of the best gifts, that she got to decorate.”

Want a fun holiday distraction? Check out the Internet-connected lights here! You can also look at these other Arduino-powered dazzling displays to help get you in the festive spirit!