Tag Archives: Led(s)

Happy Valentines day!

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Sjaak built this blinky heart for his girlfriend this Valentines day. It is based on a MAX7219 and a PIC16f1823:

My girlfriend persuaded me to start this hobby side project and as a favor I made her this blinky heart. I don’t want to buy a standard trumpery from the shop, so I locked myself up into my mancave and started to solder and code as a monkey. I put a MAX7219 8×8 LED matrix, a PIC16f1823, a CR2032 coin cell with holder and a vibration switch together. Most of the stuff I had already lying around so I started immediately.
Somewhere on the web I found a small tutorial how to use the MAX7219 with the buspirate. That made it really simple for me to test the display for faults and get myself familiar with the command set.

Project info at SMDprutser blog.

LED strips installation beyond Xmas

via Arduino Blog

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The installation of Dmitry Morozov (:: vtol: :)”Wave is my nature” exhibited at the Mars center in Moscow is focused on the concept of Wave as the basis of all audiovisual art:

The project draws from the theory of Wave–particle duality which considers the light to be a particle and a wave at the same time. In this case, the notion of the “wave” is uniform for the sound wave, light wave and a “tangible” kinetic wave with wide amplitude, physically presented in the space as stretched cables moved by a system of motors. The piece also refers to the topic of physical modeling of the wave processes which take place in various media and materials: “string”, “data flow”, “visualisation of sound”, “sonification of light” etc. In general, the installation can be viewed as a kinetic spacial light installation which reacts to the presence of audience and creates an autonomous sound and light composition.

The artist used led strips, servo motors, 2-channel sound system, ir motion sensors running on Arduino Mega and Arduino Uno:

Lab LED constant current controller board

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Ladvien blogged about his Lab LED constant current controller board project he made using DirtyBoard PCBs:

A little lab controller PCB I’m working on. It centers around four high-power constant current circuits meant to be driven by an Atmega328’s PWM.
I hate working on anything mechanical in dim light; comes from dropping parts down under the engine when working on cars. I’m also pretty particular about my type of light. The “Cool White” or CFLs really bother me. I feel like I’m a bug headed towards a bug-zapper.

I have a few design goals,
1. Warm white is the way to go. I’m shooting for four 1k lumen warm-white LEDs at 12v at ~1A.
2. I’ve a plug for an Arduino Pro Mini (APM). It’s hard to fight the APM when it comes to small footprint and versatility, oh, and price. They are super cheap if you buy them on eBay.
3. I want to make a BLE serial interface using my HM-10. This would allow me to control my LEDs using my iOS devices.
4. The A4 and A5 pins are broken out, this is meant to make the boards chainable using I2C.

Check out the video after the break.

Replacement LED driver for AN6877

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Dilshan Jayakody writes:

AN6877 is linear AF level meter IC produced by Panasonic and it is commonly found on many audio equipment. This chip is no longer manufactured by Panasonic and finding replacement chip for AN6877 is also quiet difficult.
The circuit described in this article is design to replace AN6877 base LED drivers and it is based on commonly available components. This replacement LED driver is design using 10, MMBT3904/2N3904 transistors and it can easily modify to get necessary number of outputs.

Project info at Jayakody’s blog and elect.wikispaces.com.

Light painting with a Raspberry Pi

via Raspberry Pi

Before we get to the meat of today’s post, we’ve two bits of news. Just over an hour ago we watched the Soyuz rocket carrying British ESA astronaut Tim Peake, who will be in charge of the two Astro Pis on the ISS, lift off. The Soyuz will dock with the ISS around 17:24 GMT today: please join us following Tim’s progress on Twitter from about 16:45 GMT. (You can also watch live footage at NASA TV.)

In other Raspberry Pi community news, we’re very pleased to announce that Yasmin Bey, a 14-year-old Pi developer from Southend, organiser of school computer clubs, and friend of many at Pi Towers, won the EU Digital Girl of the Year award, which this year was awarded jointly with Niamh Scanlon from Dublin. We’ve been watching Yasmin’s progress over the last year or so: she’s an astonishingly focussed and exceptionally smart girl, and we wish her all the success in the world. Well done Yasmin – we’re really proud of you!

Back to light painting.

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LadyAda from New York’s Adafruit dropped me a very short email at the end of last week, saying “You must see this.” As usual, she was right. This is one of the most eye-catching projects we’ve come across this year.

What you’re seeing in the photo above is a persistence of vision (POV) effect, where a slow shutter speed is used to capture a row of LEDs which change as they’re moved across the frame (in this instance by someone carrying and sweeping the LEDs from one side of the picture to the other over a period of a couple of seconds).

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It’s a really impressive effect, and it’s a rig you should be able to build yourself at home, using a Raspberry Pi and some additional kit. Adafruit has covered the subject before, but they’ve discovered that their new DotStar LEDs make things much easier and much better looking. DotStar LEDs use generic 2-wire SPI, so you can push data much faster than with the NeoPixels’ 800 KHz protocol, and you don’t need to mess around with specific timing functions. They also have much higher pulse width modulation (PWM), which means that things look a lot smoother and less flickery than in POV projects made with other LEDs. Result: cleaner, more detailed light painting.

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Adafruit have a made a very thorough tutorial which will help you build a 1m light painter which can support most common image formats. They’ve also helpfully included instructions on making your photos taken with this setup as bright and sharp as possible.

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We’re wondering if we have enough time to build our own rig for Christmas. If you make your own, please post a link in the comments!

 

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A connected lamp to wake me up

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Limpkin writes, “I’ve always wanted to play with these 10W RGB LEDs!
So for some reason I bought 2 IKEA lamps at a flea market. As IKEA furniture has a long history of being hacker-friendly, I figured they shouldn’t be an exception to the rule.
My plan? Fit a few 10W RGB LEDs in there together with an ESP8266 to use the final result as an alarm clock.”

Project info at Limpkin blog.