Tag Archives: Led(s)

Lightronome 1 – The light based metronome

via Dangerous Prototypes

Lightronome

Zoltán Gomori documented his lightronome build:

I got a request, to design and build an electronic metronome. You can find several on the market, but the problem it is ether producing voice or the classical mechanical metronome. The requirement here was a visual effect. To be precise four LEDs for 4/4 beat. It is required for drumming where you have no chance to hear the clicking (or maybe just through headphones).

See the full post on PakaHuszar blog.

Check out the video after the break.

STM32F103 vs GD32F103 round 2: Blink a LED

via Dangerous Prototypes

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A follow-up to the STM32F103 vs GD32F103 round 1- Solderability post, Sjaak writes:

The defacto ‘hello world’ for microcontrollers is blink a LED at a steady rate. This is exactly what I’m going to do today. I made a small 5×5 development board, soldered it up and started programming. In this first example we not gonna use fancy IRQs or timers to blink at a steady rate, but we insert NOPsas delay. This would give an idea of the RAW performance of the chip. The used code is simple; set up the maximum available clock available and then toggle RA0 for ever.

More details at smdprutser.nl.

Multicolor signal light with beeper

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Multicolor signal light with beeper for ROS by Gal Pavlin

When debugging algorithms in an autonomous vehicle a light that can show algorithm state in real time was proven to be effective for easier debugging and additional insight to what is going on in the code.
Because all existing signal light were either to bulky or too expensive we decided to build our own. It was actually quite simple with few key elements:

  • 3x RGB LED strip
  • STM32F0 microcontroller with native USB support
  • Beeper

Via Mare & Gal Electronics.

Check out the video after the break.

App note: 12Vac LED Driving without smoothing capacitors

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Application note from Diodes Incorporated on driving 12Vac LED without smoothing capacitors with their Zetex ZXLD1360 LED driver IC and SBR2A40P1 super barrier rectifier. Link here (PDF)

LED based architectural lighting is now coming of age, but there are still some problems to be considered when designing luminaires to be fitted into existing installations.

This Application Note discusses some of the challenges and shows that the omission of the traditional smoothing capacitors has advantages in saving cost, space and PFC problems.

An Arduino-powered backlit Clemson Tiger Paw

via Arduino Blog

Most people support their school or favorite sports team by buying a shirt or tuning into games. Jacob Thompson, however, took things one step further and created his own Arduino-powered, backlit Clemson Tiger Paw.

Thompson’s “WallPaw,” as he calls it, uses an Arduino Uno to receive signals from an infrared remote and to pick up sounds with a small microphone. This information is passed on to an Arduino Mega, which controls a five-meter-long strip of WS2812 LEDs to provide lighting effects.

He notes that it would be possible to use only one Arduino board for everything, but patterned his code after this tutorial that included two. The paw itself is cut out of wood and clear acrylic, allowing the lights underneath to shine through nicely.

You can see the build in action below and find more details on Thompson’s website here.

Driving a 48-segment RGB LED bar graph with a Teensy 3.2

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Glen Akins writes:

In my post Driving a SparkFun 48-Segment RGB LED Bar Graph, I stated that the hardware built there could be used to drive the LED bar graph with any combination of hardware and software that could drive one of the common 32×32 or 32×16 RGB LED matrices. Today I’m back to prove that point. In this post, I ditch the FPGA and drive the 48-segment RGB LED bar graph using a Teensy 3.2 board and the Pixelmatix SmartMatrix 3 library.

More details at Glen Akins’ blog.