Tag Archives: Led(s)

A cool infinity mirror-style bottle opener

via Arduino Blog

In his quest to create “the coolest wall-mounted bottle opener in the entire world,” it would appear that YouTuber “Never Stop Seeking” has succeeded.

As seen below, the infinity mirror-style unit is made of plexiglass and two-way mirror film, and equipped with Arduino Uno-controlled RGB LED strips that are activated by a proximity sensor as you open a beer or soda. He even included a magnetic catch for his bottle caps!

Want to build one of your own? Good news, Never Stop Seeking plans on sharing more details along with a how-to video in the coming days.

Need desk lighting? How about 1,200+ LEDs?

via Arduino Blog

After he’d just finished a project using RGB LEDs, Imgur user nolobot’s brother mentioned he needed a new computer desk. Most people would probably just let their brother buy one, others would make something out of wood, but nolobot instead decided to create something truly amazing using more than 1,200 WS2812 RGB LED modules, an Arduino Mega, aluminum extrusion, and translucent polycarbonate.

The Mega controls these LEDs with the FastLED library, which are sandwiched between a base piece of plywood and a strip of polycarbonate using custom spacers. This diffuses the light nicely, allowing for beautiful light animations directly on the desk’s surface.

You can find more on this awesome build on the project’s Imgur page!

An Arduino Knight Rider Rainbow dice that uses WS2812B RGB LEDs

via Dangerous Prototypes

pics-rainbow_random_clock_dice_arduino-600

An Arduino Knight Rider Rainbow dice built using a clock by Davide Gironi:

This project implements a Knight Rider / Rainbow effect Random Selector.
It uses an Arduino UNO and a WS2812B RGB led strip.
A friend of mine needs a random selector for train scale model.
I’ve developed this using the Arduino framework, because he would like to modify the sketch “the Arduino way”.
Unluckly I have not any picture or video of his build. So I’ve built a dice selector by using an old clock frame. I would like to thank my friend Matteo for cutting vinyls out for this project.

Check out the video after the break.

Programming an 8 digit 7-segment display, the easy way, using a Max7219

via Dangerous Prototypes

p-image

Allan Schwartz shows off the easy way to interface 7-segment displays using the MAX7219:

Previously, in part 1 of my blog posting Programming a 7-segment Display, using just Arduino digital pins (the hard way) we had demonstrated how to hook up a pair of 7-segment displays to an Arduino, treating each individual segment as a separate LED. There was a bit of tricky logic to translate each digit into the segments A, B, C, D, E, F, G plus additional logic to turn the digital pins on or off. Although I tried to code it as efficiently as possible, the logic may have been difficult to understand.
Also, constructing the project was fairly tedious, with dozens of resistors and hook-up wires.
Instead, lets do this the easy way. A typical MAX7219 module comprised of a single MAX7219 chip and eight 7-segment displays.

More details at www.whatimade.today.

Dot² isn’t your typical coffee table

via Arduino Blog

Coffee tables are useful for putting coffee, food, or perhaps way too much junk on, but it’s 2017—we can do better than that! Akshay Baweja certainly has at least with Dot², an interactive piece of furniture that can run animations, display lighting effects, and play old-school games.

The Arduino Mega-based table features a matrix of 296 LEDs that shine up through sections of diffused acrylic, and uses a grid of foam board strips to keep each light in a square. Dot² can be controlled either by a PC running GLEDIATOR software, or via a smartphone using a Bluetooth connection and its own custom app.

The outside doesn’t look too shabby either. With an interesting wood pattern on the side, even when off it seems like there could be something more lurking just below the table’s glass!

Want to build one of your own? Head over to this incredible project’s Instructables page to get started. And, if you’d like to know more about how it’s controlled, check out Baweja’s app here or GLEDIATOR’s site for the computer software he used.

Interactive geodesic LED dome = Extreme geometric fun!

via Arduino Blog

We’ve all seen geodesic domes in one form or another, whether as a modern experiment, as housing from a bygone era, or perhaps as a gigantic structure in Orlando (technically a geodesic sphere). Jon Bumstead apparently wasn’t satisfied with current dome options, and instead created his own, integrating elements from programmable LED tables to make it interactive.

The resulting build is quite spectacular. Each triangular section able to be lit up with an RGB LED, and further information is output to five MIDI signals in order to produce sound. This means that up to five people can play the dome as an instrument simultaneously. If that wasn’t enough, the Arduino Uno-based dome is programmed to play a version of Simon or Pong, and can be set up to display a light show!

I constructed a geodesic dome consisting of 120 triangles with an LED and sensor at each triangle. Each LED can be addressed individually and each sensor is tuned specifically for a single triangle. The dome is programmed with an Arduino to light up and produce a MIDI signal depending on which triangle you place your hand.

Pretty cool, right? Head over to the project’s Instructables page to see more, or if you’d like information on constructing the dome itself, check out Domerama.