Tag Archives: Maker Builds

Gladys Project: a Raspberry Pi home assistant

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If, like me, you’re a pretty poor time-keeper with the uncanny ability to never get up when your alarm goes off and yet still somehow make it to work just in time — a little dishevelled, brushing your teeth in the office bathroom — then you too need Gladys.

Raspberry Pi home assistant

Over the last year, we’ve seen off-the-shelf home assistants make their way onto the Raspberry Pi. With the likes of Amazon Alexa, Google Home, and Siri, it’s becoming ever easier to tell the air around you to “Turn off the bathroom light” or “Resume my audiobook”, and it happens without you lifting a finger. It’s quite wonderful. And alongside these big names are several home-brew variants, such as Jarvis and Jasper, which were developed to run on a Pi in order to perform home automation tasks.

So do we need another such service? Sure! And here’s why…

A Romantic Mode with your Home Assistant Gladys !

A simple romantic mode in Gladys ! See https://gladysproject.com for more informations about the project :) Devices used : – A 5$ Xiaomi Switch Button – A Raspberry Pi 3 with Gladys on it – Connected lights ( Works with Philips Hue, Milight lamp, etc..

Gladys Project

According to the Gladys creators’ website, Gladys Project is ‘an open-source program which runs on your Raspberry Pi. It communicates with all your devices and checks your calendar to help you in your everyday life’.

Gladys does the basic day-to-day life maintenance tasks that I need handled in order to exist without my mum there to remind me to wake up in time for work. And, as you can see from the video above, it also plays some mean George Michael.

A screenshot of a mobile phone showing the Gladys app - Gladys Project home assistant

Gladys can help run your day from start to finish, taking into consideration road conditions and travel time to ensure you’re never late, regardless of external influences. It takes you 30 minutes to get ready and another 30 minutes to drive to work for 9.00? OK, but today there’s a queue on the motorway, and now your drive time is looking to be closer to an hour. Thankfully, Gladys has woken you up a half hour earlier, so you’re still on time. Isn’t that nice of her? And while you’re showering and mourning those precious stolen minutes of sleep, she’s opening the blinds and brewing coffee for you. Thanks, mum!

A screenshot of the Gladys hub on the Raspberry Pi - Gladys Project home assistant

Set the parameters of your home(s) using the dedicated hub.

Detecting your return home at the end of the day, Gladys runs your pre-set evening routine. Then, once you place your phone on an NFC tag to indicate bedtime, she turns off the lights and, if your nighttime preferences dictate it, starts the whale music playlist, sending you into a deep, stressless slumber.

A screenshot of Etcher showing the install process of the Gladys image - Gladys Project home assistant

Gladys comes as a pre-built Raspbian image, ready to be cloned to an SD card.

Gladys is free to download from the Gladys Project website and is compatible with smart devices such as Philips Hue lightbulbs, WeMo Insight Switches, and the ever tricky to control without the official app Sonos speakers!

Automate and chill

Which tasks and devices in your home do you control with a home assistant? Do you love sensor-controlled lighting which helps you save on electricity? How about working your way through an audiobook as you do your housework, requesting a pause every time you turn on the vacuum cleaner?

Share your experiences with us in the comments below, and if you’ve built a home assistant for Raspberry Pi, or use an existing setup to run your household, share that too.

And, as ever, if you want to keep up to date with Raspberry Pi projects from across the globe, be sure to follow us on social media, sign up to our weekly newsletter, the Raspberry Pi Weekly, and check out The MagPi, the official magazine of the Raspberry Pi community, available in stores or as a free PDF download.

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BitBarista: a fully autonomous corporation

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To some people, the idea of a fully autonomous corporation might seem like the beginning of the end. However, while the BitBarista coffee machine prototype can indeed run itself without any human interference, it also teaches a lesson about ethical responsibility and the value of quality.

BitBarista

Bitcoin coffee machine that engages coffee drinkers in the value chain

Autonomous corporations

If you’ve played Paperclips, you get it. And in case you haven’t played Paperclips, I will only say this: give a robot one job and full control to complete the task, and things may turn in a very unexpected direction. Or, in the case of Rick and Morty, they end in emotional breakdown.

BitBarista

While the fully autonomous BitBarista resides primarily on the drawing board, the team at the University of Edinburgh’s Center for Design Informatics have built a proof-of-concept using a Raspberry Pi and a Delonghi coffee maker.

BitBarista fully autonomous coffee machine using Raspberry Pi

Recently described by the BBC as ‘a coffee machine with a life of its own, dispensing coffee to punters with an ethical preference’, BitBarista works in conjunction with customers to source coffee and complete maintenance tasks in exchange for BitCoin payments. Customers pay for their coffee in BitCoin, and when BitBarista needs maintenance such as cleaning, water replenishment, or restocking, it can pay the same customers for completing those tasks.

BitBarista fully autonomous coffee machine using Raspberry Pi

Moreover, customers choose which coffee beans the machine purchases based on quality, price, environmental impact, and social responsibility. BitBarista also collects and displays data on the most common bean choices.

BitBarista fully autonomous coffee machine using Raspberry Pi

So not only is BitBarista a study into the concept of full autonomy, it’s also a means of data collection about the societal preference of cost compared to social and environmental responsibility.

For more information on BitBarista, visit the Design Informatics and PETRAS websites.

Home-made autonomy

Many people already have store-bought autonomous technology within their homes, such as the Roomba vacuum cleaner or the Nest Smart Thermostat. And within the maker community, many more still have created such devices using sensors, mobile apps, and microprocessors such as the Raspberry Pi. We see examples using the Raspberry Pi on a daily basis, from simple motion-controlled lights and security cameras to advanced devices using temperature sensors and WiFi technology to detect the presence of specific people.

How to Make a Smart Security Camera with a Raspberry Pi Zero

In this video, we use a Raspberry Pi Zero W and a Raspberry Pi camera to make a smart security camera! The camera uses object detection (with OpenCV) to send you an email whenever it sees an intruder. It also runs a webcam so you can view live video from the camera when you are away.

To get started building your own autonomous technology, you could have a look at our resources Laser tripwire and Getting started with picamera. These will help you build a visitor register of everyone who crosses the threshold a specific room.

Or build your own Raspberry Pi Zero W Butter Robot for the lolz.

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Hacker House’s gesture-controlled holographic visualiser

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YouTube makers Hacker House are back with a beautiful Flick-controlled holographic music visualiser that we’d really like to have at Pi Towers, please and thank you.

Make a Holographic Audio Visualizer with Gesture Control

Find all the code and materials on: https://www.hackster.io/hackerhouse/holographic-audio-visualizer-with-motion-control-e72fee A 3D holographic audio visualizer with gesture control can definitely spice up your party and impress your friends. This display projects an image from a monitor down onto an acrylic pyramid, or “frustum”, which then creates a 3D effect.

Homemade holographic visualiser

You may have seen a similar trick for creating holograms in this tutorial by American Hacker:

How To Make 3D Hologram Projector – No Glasses

Who will know that from plastic cd case we can make mini 3d hologram generator and you can watch 3d videos without glasses.

The illusion works due to the way in which images reflect off a flat-topped pyramid or frustum, to use its proper name. In the wonderful way they always do, the residents of Hacker House have now taken this trick one step further.

The Hacker House upgrade

Using an LCD monitor, 3D-printed parts, a Raspberry Pi, and a Flick board, the Hacker House team has produced a music visualiser truly worthy of being on display.

Hacker House Raspberry Pi holographic visualiser

The Pi Supply Flick is a 3D-tracking and gesture board for your Raspberry Pi, enabling you to channel your inner Jedi and control devices with a mere swish of your hand. As the Hacker House makers explain, in this music player project, there are various ways in which you could control the playlist, visualisation, and volume. However, using the Flick adds a wow-factor that we highly approve of.

The music and visualisations are supplied by a Mac running node.js. As the Raspberry Pi is running on the same network as the Mac, it can communicate with the it via HTTP requests.

Sketch of network for Hacker House Raspberry Pi holographic visualiser

The Pi processes incoming commands from the Flick board, and in response send requests to the Mac. Swipe upward above the Flick board, for example, and the Raspberry Pi will request a change of visualisation. Swipe right, and the song will change.

Hacker House Raspberry Pi holographic visualiser

As for the hologram itself, it is formed on an acrylic pyramid sitting below an LCD screen. Images on the screen reflect off the three sides of the pyramid, creating the illusion of a three-dimensional image within. Standard hocus pocus trickery.

Full details on the holographic visualiser, including the scripts, can be found on the hackster.io project page. And if you make your own, we’d love to see it.

Your turn

Using ideas from this Hacker House build and the American Hacker tutorial, our maker community is bound to create amazing things with the Raspberry Pi, holograms, and tricks of the eye. We’re intrigued to see what you come up with!

For inspiration, another example of a Raspberry Pi optical illusion project is Brian Corteil’s Digital Zoetrope:

Brian Corteil's Digital Zoetrope - Hacker House Raspberry Pi holographic visualiser

Are you up for the challenge of incorporating optical illusions into your Raspberry Pi builds? Share your project ideas and creations in the comments below!

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A Raspberry Pi Halloween projects spectacular

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Come with us on a journey to discover the 2017 Raspberry Pi Halloween projects that caught our eye, raised our hair, or sent us screaming into the night.

A clip of someone being pulled towards a trap door by hands reaching up from it - Raspberry Pi Halloween projects

Happy Halloween

Whether you’re easily scared or practically unshakeable, you can celebrate Halloween with Pi projects of any level of creepiness.

Even makers of a delicate constitution will enjoy making this Code Club Ghostbusters game, or building an interactive board game using Halloween lights with this MagPi tutorial by Mike Cook. And how about a wearable, cheerily LED-enhanced pumpkin created with the help of this CoderDojo resource? Cute, no?

Felt pumpkin with blinking LED smiley face - Raspberry Pi Halloween projects

Speaking of wearables, Derek Woodroffe’s be-tentacled hat may writhe disconcertingly, but at least it won’t reach out for you. Although, you could make it do that, if you were a terrible person.

Slightly queasy Halloween

Your decorations don’t have to be terrifying: this carved Pumpkin Pi and the Poplawskis’ Halloween decorations are controlled remotely via the web, but they’re more likely to give you happy goosebumps than cold sweats.

A clip of blinking Halloween decorations covering a house - Raspberry Pi Halloween projects

The Snake Eyes Bonnet pumpkin and the monster-face projection controlled by Pis that we showed you in our Halloween Twitter round-up look fairly friendly. Even the 3D-printed jack-o’-lantern by wermy, creator of mintyPi, is kind of adorable, if you ignore the teeth. And who knows, that AlexaPi-powered talking skull that’s staring at you could be an affable fellow who just fancies a chat, right? Right?

Horror-struck Halloween

OK, fine. You’re after something properly frightening. How about the haunted magic mirror by Kapitein Haak, or this one, with added Philips Hue effects, by Ben Eagan. As if your face first thing in the morning wasn’t shocking enough.

Haunted magic mirror demonstration - Raspberry Pi Halloween projects

If you find those rigid-faced, bow-lipped, plastic dolls more sinister than sweet – and you’re right to do so: they’re horrible – you won’t like this evil toy. Possessed by an unquiet shade, it’s straight out of my nightmares.

Earlier this month we covered Adafruit’s haunted portrait how-to. This build by Dominick Marino takes that concept to new, terrifying, heights.

Haunted portrait project demo - Raspberry Pi Halloween projects

Why not add some motion-triggered ghost projections to your Halloween setup? They’ll go nicely with the face-tracking, self-winding, hair-raising jack-in-the-box you can make thanks to Sean Hodgins’ YouTube tutorial.

And then, last of all, there’s this.

The Saw franchise's Billy the puppet on a tricycle - Raspberry Pi Halloween projects

NO.

This recreation of Billy the Puppet from the Saw franchise is Pi-powered, it’s mobile, and it talks. You can remotely control it, and I am not even remotely OK with it. That being said, if you’re keen to have one of your own, be my guest. Just follow the guide on Instructables. It’s your funeral.

Make your Halloween

It’s been a great year for scary Raspberry Pi makes, and we hope you have a blast using your Pi to get into the Halloween spirit.

And speaking of spirits, Matt Reed of RedPepper has created a Pi-based ghost detector! It uses Google’s Speech Neural Network AI to listen for voices in the ether, and it’s live-streaming tonight. Perfect for watching while you’re waiting for the trick-or-treaters to show up.

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The Poplawski’s Holiday Frights

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After becoming internet-famous for their interactive Christmas lights, the Poplawskis have expanded their festive offerings this year with Holiday Frights, a fiendish collection of spooky decor controlled by a Raspberry Pi.

Poplawski's Holiday Frights Raspberry Pi Halloween

The Poplawskis’ holiday lights

Full of lights and inflatable decorations sprawling across the front lawn, the annual pi-powered Poplawski Christmas setup is something we await eagerly here at Pi Towers. What better way to celebrate the start of the holiday season than by inflating reindeer and flashing fairy lights on another continent?

Poplawski's Holiday Lights Raspberry Pi

image c/o Chris Poplawski

So this year, when an email appeared in our inbox to announce the Holiday Frights Halloween edition, we were over the moon!

Take control

It’s about 5am in Easton, Pennsylvania, but I’m 99% sure the residents of the Poplawski’s Holiday Frights home were fully aware of me endlessly toggling their Halloween decorations  — on, off, on, off — in the process of creating the GIF above.

The decorations of the Poplawski’s Holiday Frights are controlled by a Raspberry Pi which, in turn, takes input from a website. And while we’ve seen many Pi projects with online interfaces controlling real-life devices, we can’t help but have a soft spot for this particular one because of its pretty, flashy lights.

Poplawski's Holiday Frights website Raspberry Pi Halloween

To try out the decorations yourself, go to the Poplawski’s Holiday Frights website. Also make sure to bookmark the site, or follow the Facebook page, for updates on their Christmas edition.

When you’re on the site, you will also see how many other people are currently online. If you’re not alone, the battle over which lights are turned on or off can commence! In case you’re feeling extra generous, you can donate 10¢ to fix the decorations in a state of your choosing for 60 seconds, while also helping the Poplawskis power their lights.

Getting spooky

Have you built something Pi-powered and spooky for Halloween? Make sure to share it with us across our social media accounts or in the comments below.

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Ben’s Raspberry Pi Twilight Zone pinball hack

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When Ben North was faced with the dilemma of his nine-year-old son wanting him to watch his pinball games while, at the same time, Ben should be doing housework, he came up with a brilliant hack. Ben decided to investigate the inner workings of his twenty-year-old Twilight Zone pinball machine to convert its score display data into a video stream he could keep an eye on while working.

Ben North Raspberry Pi Twilight Zone Pinball

Ben ended up with this. Read on to find out how…

Dad? Dad! DAD!!

Kids love sharing their achievements. That’s a given. And so, after Ben introduced his son Zach to his beloved pinball machine, Zach wanted his dad to witness his progress. However, at some point Ben had to get back to the dull reality of adulting.

My son Zach, now 9, has been steadily getting better at [playing pinball], and is keen for me to watch his games. So he and I wanted a way for me to keep an eye on how his game is going, while I do other jobs elsewhere.

The two of them thought that, with the right tools and some fiddling, they could hijack the machine’s score information on its way to the dot matrix display and divert it to a computer. “One way to do this would be to set up a webcam.” Ben explains on his blog, “But where’s the fun in that?”

Twilight Zone pinball wizardry

After researching how the dot matrix receives and displays the score data, Ben and Zach figured out how to fetch its output using a 16-channel USB logic analyser. Then they dove into learning to convert the data the logic analyser outputs back into images.

Ben North Raspberry Pi Twilight Zone Pinball

“Exploring in more detail confirmed that the data looked reasonable. We could see well-distinguished frames and rows, and within each row, the pixel data had a mixture of high (lit pixel) and low (dark pixel).”

After Ben managed to convert the signals of one frame into a human-readable pixel image, it was time to think about the hardware that could do this conversion in real time. Though he and Zach were convinced they would have to build custom hardware to complete their project, they decided to first give the Raspberry Pi a go. And it turned out that the Pi was up to the challenge!

Ben North Raspberry Pi Twilight Zone Pinball - example output

“By an amazing coincidence, the [first] frame I decoded was one showing that I am the current Lost In The Zone champion.”

To decode the first frame, Ben had written a Python script. However, he coded the program to produce a score live stream in C++, since this language is better at handling high-speed input and output. To make sure Zach would learn from the experience, Ben explained the how and why of the program to him.

I talked through with Zach what the program needed to do — detect clock edges, sample pixel data, collect rows, etc. — but then he left me to do ‘all the boring typing’.

Ben used various pieces of open-source software while working on this project, including the sigrok suite for signal analysis and the multimedia framework gstreamer for handling the live video stream to the Raspberry Pi.

Find more information about the Twilight Zone pinball build, including a lot of technical details and the code itself, on Ben’s blog.

Worthy self-promotion from Ben

“I also did an FPGA project to replicate some of the Colossus code-breaking machine used in Bletchley Park during World War II,” explained Ben in our recent emails. “with a Raspberry Pi as the host.”

Colossus computer Twilight Zone Pinball

The original Colossus, not Ben’s.
Image c/o Wikipedia

As a bit of a history nerd myself, I think this is beyond cool. And if, like me, you’d like to learn more, check out the link here.

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