Tag Archives: Makers

This animatronic device turns speech into sign language

via Arduino Blog

Using a couple Arduinos, a team of Makers at a recent McHacks 24-hour hackathon developed a speech-to-sign language automaton.

Alex Foley, along with Clive Chan, Colin Daly, and Wilson Wu, wanted to make a tool to help with translation between oral and sign languages. What they came up with was an amazing animatronic setup that can listen to speech via a computer interface, and then translate it into sign language.

This device takes the form of two 3D-printed hands, which are controlled by servos and a pair Arduino Unos. In addition to speech translation, the setup can sense hand motions using Leap Motion’s API, allowing it to mirror a person’s gestures.

You can read about the development process in Foley’s Medium write-up, including their first attempt at control using a single Mega board.

An experimental game with a conductive rubber band controller

via Arduino Blog

RubberArms is an experimental rubber band game, created by Robin Baumgarten at the Global Game Jam 2017 in Yverdon-les-Bains, Switzerland.

The controller uses a conductive rubber cord from Adafruit that changes resistance as it’s stretched. This resistance is measured by an Arduino Micro/Leonardo (or a Teensy 3.2), which acts as a USB joystick sending signals to Unity3D. (The game is coded in Unity3D using Spring Joints and Line Renderers.)

At this point, the game is a simple prototype where you control the distance of two characters whose arms stretch whenever you stretch the rubber band, throwing little ‘Bleps’ around. You can read more about RubberArms on Baumgarten’s page, as well as his earlier project “Line Wobbler” here.

Pioneers: the first challenge is…

via Raspberry Pi

After introducing you all to Pioneers back in November, we’ve seen some amazing responses across social media with teams registering, Code Clubs and Jams retweeting and everyone getting themselves pumped up and ready for action.

Nicholas Tollervey on Twitter

This is the best thing I’ve seen in all my years involved in tech related education: https://t.co/5jerR9770r #MakeYourIdeas

Mass excitement all round – including here at Pi Towers! So, without further ado, here’s the delightful Owen to reveal the first challenge.

Pioneers Theme Launch

The eagerly anticipated Pioneers theme launch is here! If you’re yet to register for Pioneers, make sure you head to raspberrypi.org/pioneers And if you’ve no idea what we’re talking about, here’s Owen to explain more https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPP3dfTlLOs&t=18s

That’s right: we want you to make us laugh with tech. As well as the great examples that Owen provides, you’ll also find some great starters on the Pioneers website, along with hundreds of projects online.

If you’ve yet to register your team, make sure you do so via this form. And if you’re struggling to find a mentor for your team, or a team to mentor, make sure to use the #MakeYourIdeas tag on social media to keep in the loop. It’s also worth checking organisations such as your local Code Club, CoderDojo, or makerspace for anyone looking to get involved.

This Pioneers challenge is open to anyone in the UK between the ages of twelve and 15. If you’re soon to turn twelve or have just turned 16, head over to the Pioneers FAQ page – you may still be eligible to enter.

So get making, and make sure to share the process on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat using #MakeYourIdeas!

posting your projects progress

The post Pioneers: the first challenge is… appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

An Arduino laser pinball machine

via Arduino Blog

Pinball machines may seem like a good Maker project, but the mechanical components are quite involved. “Joesinstructables,” however, decided to take on this project on using an Erector Set, solenoids, and an Arduino board. In order to get around the challenge of using a heavy steel ball, he instead used a much lighter ping pong ball, sensed in the game by laser tripwires.

A number of solenoids propel the ball around and sound a service desk bell whenever a target is hit–one to three times depending on the difficulty level. Once the ball comes to rest in a target, a laser tripwire automatically triggers a solenoid to eject the ball, putting it back in play.

You can see more info on this build here, or even check out an earlier version for more inspiration!

A DIY Segway-style vehicle

via Arduino Blog

Instructables user “stoppi71” has been building a DIY Segway for a while now, and just posted a bunch of info on the project.

Balancing on two side-by-side wheels is rather difficult, though as the original Segway showed us, it’s quite possible with electronics to help. Naturally, hobbyists have tried to duplicate this effort, including stoppi71, who started his experiments several years ago. He uses both an accelerometer and gyroscope to determine the angle, along with PID control to apply the correct amount of power to each wheel. Buttons on either side handle steering.

Though not the easiest project featured here, if you’re thinking about doing something simlar, his writeup is worth a look! If you enjoy alternative modes of transportation, you may want to check out this electric unicycle as well!

Peeqo is a desktop bot that communicates through GIFs

via Arduino Blog

If you’ve been looking for a robotic assistant with the functionality of an Amazon Echo and the cuteness of a Disney character, you’re in luck. That’s because Abhishek Singh has created Peeqo, an open-source DIY device that responds to human speech through GIFs.

Peeqo has a Raspberry Pi 3 for his brain along with a pair of Arduino Mini boards for controlling movement and LED notifications. The 3D-printed bot is equipped with a half-dozen servos, four custom microphones, a NeoPixel ring on top of his head, a camera at his chest, a USB speaker, and an LCD display.

As for voice recognition, Peeqo uses the Google Speech API for detecting the wake word ‘Peeqo’ and API.AI for responding to the query. The desktop companion can also serve as a full-fledged entertainment system that plays your favorite Spotify tunes. Ask for a song and he’ll sway to the beat.

But that’s not all. Singh even developed a Chrome extension that uses Peeqo to boost his productivity and motivate him to avoid social media while working. Once he tells it to block a certain site, the robot lets his displeasure be known in the form of a GIF.

Intrigued? You can see how Singh brought Peeqo to life on Imgur.