Tag Archives: music

MIDI-controlled slide whistle made with an Arduino Due

via Arduino Blog

Slide whistles and recorders can be great for learning music, and perhaps a bit of fun, but what about teaching a robot to play such a wind instrument? The Mixed Signal’s MIDI-controlled system could be used for just that.

The project is comprised of a 3D-printed fipple and piston that go into a PVC tube, while air input is via a centrifugal blower fan. A plunger with a rack-and-pinion gear are used to move the piston back and forth, changing the note being played.

A keyboard provides the user interface here, though any number of digital audio workstation devices should be able to duplicate this human task if needed. It’s hooked up to an Arduino Due with a CNC shield, which controls the single stepper motor.

You can find more details on the fipple flute on Hackster and Hackaday, and see a demo of it in action below.

Who needs vinyl records when you’ve got Raspberry Pi and NFC?

via Raspberry Pi

Redditor Mark Hank missed the tactile experience of vinyl records so he removed the insides of an old Sonos Boost to turn it into a Raspberry Pi- and NFC-powered music player. Yes, this really works:

The Sonos Boost was purchased for just £3 on eBay. Mark pulled all the original insides out of it and repurposed it as what they call a ‘vinyl emulator’ to better replicate the experience of playing records than what a simple touchscreen offers.

The Boost now contains a Raspberry Pi 3A+ and an ACR122U NFC reader, and it plays a specific album, playlist, or radio station when you tap a specific NFC tag on it. It’s teamed with Sonos speakers, and NTAG213 NFC tags. The maker recommends you go with the largest tags you can find, as it will improve read performance; they went with these massive ones.

One of the album covers printed onto thick card

The tags are inside printouts mounted on 1mm thick card (those album cover artwork squares getting chucked at the Sonos in the video), and they’re “super cheap” according to the maker.

You’ll need to install the node-sonos-http-api package on your Raspberry Pi; it’s the basis of the whole back-end of the project. The maker provides full instructions on their original post, including on how to get Spotify up and running on your Raspberry Pi.

The whole setup neatened up

Rather than manually typing HTTP requests into a web browser, the maker wanted to automate the process so that the Raspberry Pi does it when presented with certain stimulus (aka when the NFC reader is triggered). They also walk you through this process in their step-by-step instructions.

How the maker hid the mess under the display table

The entire build cost around £50, and the great thing is that it doesn’t need to sit inside an old Sonos Boost if you don’t want it to. The reader works through modest-width wood, so you can mount it under a counter, install it in a ‘now listening’ stand, whatever — it’s really up to you.

Full instructions are available on hackster.io! And here’s all the code you’ll need, handily stored on GitHub.

The post Who needs vinyl records when you’ve got Raspberry Pi and NFC? appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Go back in time with a Raspberry Pi-powered radio

via Raspberry Pi

Take a musical trip down memory lane all the way back to the 1920s.

Sick of listening to the same dozen albums on repeat, or feeling stifled by the funnel of near-identical YouTube playlist rabbit holes? If you’re looking to broaden your musical horizons and combine that quest with a vintage-themed Raspberry Pi–powered project, here’s a great idea…

Alex created a ‘Radio Time Machine’ that covers 10 decades of music, from the 1920s up to the 2020s. Each decade has its own Spotify playlist, with hundreds of songs from that decade played randomly. This project with the look of a vintage radio offers a great, immersive learning experience and should throw up tonnes of musical talent you’ve never heard of.

In the comments section of their reddit post, Alex explained that replacing the screen of the vintage shell they housed the tech in was the hardest part of the build. On the screen, each decade is represented with a unique icon, from a gramophone, through to a cassette tape and the cloud. Here’s a closer look at it:

Now let’s take a look at the hardware and software it took to pull the whole project together…

Hardware:

  • Vintage Bluetooth radio (Alex found this affordable one on Amazon)
  • Raspberry Pi 4
  • Arduino Nano
  • 2 RGB LEDs for the dial
  • 1 button (on the back) to power on/off (long press) or play the next track (short press)

The Raspberry Pi 4 audio output is connected to the auxiliary input on the radio (3.5mm jack).

Software:

    • Mopidy library (Spotify)
    • Custom NodeJS app with JohnnyFive library to read the button and potentiometer values, trigger the LEDs via the Arduino, and load the relevant playlists with Mopidy

Take a look at the video on reddit to hear the Radio Time Machine in action. The added detail of the white noise that sounds as the dial is turned to switch between decades is especially cool.

How do you find ten decades of music?

Alex even went to the trouble of sharing each decade’s playlist in the comments of their original reddit post.

Here you go:

1920s
1930s
1940s
1950s
1960s
1970s
1980s
1990s
2000s
2010s

Comment below to tell us which decade sounds the coolest to you. We’re nineties kids ourselves!

The post Go back in time with a Raspberry Pi-powered radio appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

These loo rolls formed a choir

via Raspberry Pi

Have all of y’all been hoarding toilet roll over recent weeks in an inexplicable response to the global pandemic, or is that just a quirk here in the UK? Well, the most inventive use of the essential household item we’ve ever seen is this musical project by Max Björverud.

Ahh, the dulcet tones of wall-mounted toilet roll holders, hey? This looks like one of those magical ‘how do they do that?’ projects but, rest assured, it’s all explicable.

Max explains that Singing Toilet is made possible with a Raspberry Pi running Pure Data. The invention also comprises a HiFiBerry Amp, an Arduino Mega, eight hall effect sensors, and eight magnets. The toilet roll holders are controlled with the hall effect sensors, and the magnets connect to the Arduino Mega.

In this video, you can see the hall effect sensor and the 3D-printed attachment that holds the magnet:

Max measures the speed of each toilet roll with a hall effect sensor and magnet. The audio is played and sampled with a Pure Data patch. In the comments on his original Reddit post, he says this was all pretty straight-forward but that it took a while to print a holder for the magnets, because you need to be able to change the toilet rolls when the precious bathroom tissue runs out!

Max began prototyping his invention last summer and installed it at creative agency Snask in his hometown of Stockholm in December.

The post These loo rolls formed a choir appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

This maker turned an antique typewriter into a MIDI drum machine

via Arduino Blog

Vintage typewriters are truly amazing pieces of technology, but unlike modern keyboards, they are decidedly one-purpose machines. William Sun Petrus, however, had other ideas for his 1920s-era Remington Portable typewriter, augmenting hammers with wires as inputs to an Arduino Mega.

Input signals are produced when each key strikes a metallic “live plate” in the center, completing a circuit. This info is passed along as MIDI signals to a computer running Ableton digital audio software, allowing him to create the excellent beat seen in the video below. 

Typewriter code is available on GitHub, where you’ll certainly notice the lines from Green Eggs and Ham that are output on an LCD screen at the base of the almost 100-year-old device.

Greg’s Harp is an Arduino-powered robotic string instrument

via Arduino Blog

Frank Piesik recently designed a robotic three-stringed instrument for his friend, Gregor, that features a unique sound and mechanical arrangement. Notes are selected by an array of 12 servos — four for each string — which pull down using a loop mechanism. 

The aptly named Greg’s Harp is played by a solenoid-driven “KickUp” device that hits it from below and a small motor that continuously swipes with a “tape-propeller.” A coil assembly is also implemented to give the notes the ability to keep ringing for as long as needed (infinite sustain).

Everything is controlled by pair of Arduino Nano boards, which allow for the large number of outputs needed here, along with a Teensy 3.2 for audio processing and MIDI capabilities. You can see and hear this amazing project in the video below and more info is available in Piesik’s blog post.