Tag Archives: ON Semiconductors

App note: The importance of compensation capacitors on the eFuse power line

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Inductive spike on voltage rails causes eFuse to shutdown, here’s an app note from ON Semiconductors on how they solve this problem from happening. Link here (PDF)

ON Semiconductor produces a wide variety of silicon based protection products including current limiting devices such as Electronic Fuses (eFuses). During an over−current stress, eFuses can limit the current applied to a load as well as remove power from the load entirely. This fundamental feature of the eFuse makes it an easy choice to protect against inrush currents which can be seen on power lines of hard−disk drive (HDD) and enterprise−server systems during hot−plug operation or load−fault conditions. During the eFuse current limiting operation, the threat exists of an inductive spike on the power line (VCC) at the point of device turn−off due to thermal shutdown. This Application Note will discuss the failure mechanism this threat exposes the eFuse to, and will explain how to combat it by adding compensation capacitors onto the power line when using the auto−retry (MN2) version of the eFuse.

App note: eFuse reverse voltage protection

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App note from ON Semiconductors about eFuses’ ability to block reverse voltage. Link here (PDF)

One area in which they (eFuses) differ in performance is reverse polarity protection. While a TVS device and polyfuse will protect against reverse voltages, the nature of an integrated semiconductor device does not inherently allow for this type of protection.
This simple circuit allows the device to protect against reverse voltage situations by simply blocking the reverse voltage. This is equivalent of the action of a poly fuse only with less leakage. In comparison to a mechanical fuse, this is a far superior solution since the mechanical fuse will not reset and this circuit will automatically reset when the correct voltage is applied.

App note: Implementation of error code correction in EEPROMs

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App note from ON Semiconductors about their EEPROM error correction. Link here (PDF)

Some of ON’s automotive EEPROMs, like the Grade 0 NV25xxx family (SPI, 1 – 64 Kb) and the Grade 1 CAV24Cxx / CAV25xxx (Grade 1, 128 Kb and higher) implement an Error Code Correction scheme. What this means is that for each chunk of data in the EEPROM array (8 bits for 1 – 64 Kb densities, 32 bits for 128 Kb and higher), the memory stores a redundancy code in separate EEPROM cells.

App note: Revolutionizing analog to digital conversion

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App note from ON Semiconductors introducing their nano power ADC NCD9801x. Link here (PDF)

The NCD9801x ADC is a differential 12−bit resolution successive approximation register analog−to−digital converter unlike any other SAR ADC available on the market. It uses an innovative design to keep a low input capacitance of 2 pF, easily besting the typical SAR ADC input capacitance. The analog power consumption of the NCD9801x converter can reach nano−Watt levels during conversion and can be scaled dynamically based on the clock rate. These two unique traits allow designers to utilize the NCD9801x in design applications that have previously been unachievable.

App note: Charging capacitive loads with eFuse

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App note from ON Semiconductors on how eFuse manage to cope up with large capacitive loads. Link here (PDF)

The eFuse protection devices are used for limiting the system load current in the events of overload or short circuit. Many applications employ On Semiconductor eFuses at the power input stage of the system between the main power input connector and DC−DC converters or power regulators. The systems utilizing eFuse protection devices at the power input stage may represent inductive, resistive, capacitive or mixed types of loads.
One of the common load characteristics for various systems is large capacitive load, typically starting from 1mF all the way to few hundred milli Farads. The challenge presented by such load to an overcurrent protection system is large inrush current due to the excessive capacitance which will cause the device to shut down during startup.

App note: Tuning linear redrivers

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App note from ON Semiconductors about linear redrivers setting. Linear redrivers are used in systems in order to improve high speed signal integrity in systems transmitting digital data. Link here (PDF)

Linear redrivers are used in many applications that transmit data at high speeds. They can be found on computer motherboards, gaming consoles, graphics cards, cables, and any other environment that transmits digital data. More specific examples of common applications using linear redrivers include USB, DisplayPort, HDMI, PCIe, and SATA ports.