Tag Archives: Osmosoft

Performance (MilkyMist)

via OSHUG

It stands to reason that hardware which is open to being studied, modified and improved would be well suited to performance environments, and just as F/OSS has proved popular in support of creative practices so is OSHW similarly gaining favour. With designs ranging from simple electronic instruments that make for an ideal first electronics project to vastly more complex processing and synthesis devices.

At the eighth OSHUG meeting we'll be hearing about the Milkymist™ project which "develops a comprehensive open source solution for the live synthesis of interactive visual effects for VJs (video performance artists)".

MilkyMist - An FPGA-based open-hardware video synthesis platform

The MilkyMist project develops a stand-alone device in a small form factor that is capable of rendering MilkDrop-esque visuals effects in real time, with a high level of interaction with many sensors and using live audio and video streams as a base. The flexibility of the FPGA used as a central component enables advanced users to modify the design, and also permits compact integration of many interfaces (Ethernet, OSC, MIDI, DMX512, video inputs, GPIO, VGA output, USB, Irda ...), making Milkymist™ a platform of choice for the mobile VJ. But Milkymist™ is more than a visual synthesizer - it is also one of the leading open source system-on-chip designs. It is today the fastest open source system-on-chip capable of running Linux, and it comes with an extensive set of features and graphics accelerators. The IP cores that make up the system-on-chip are entirely written in open source synthesizable Verilog HDL and come with test benches and documentation, which makes Milkymist™ a great library of re-usable logic cores to serve as a base for other open source hardware.

Yann Sionneau is a twenty two year old Frenchman and soon to be graduated from the telecommunication and networking engineering school Télécom SudParis. His current interests in the main are low level software development, FPGA design, embedded systems and networks. He read his first C language book when he was 12 and fell in love with the language. He met Sebastien Bourdeauducq (aka lekernel), leader of the Milkymist project, in 2008 while doing whilst an intern at a startup co-founded by Sebastien. He ported RTEMS to Milkymist as part of the Google Summer of Code 2010 program and has been following the project for some time.

Note: Please aim to arrive for 18:00 - 18:15 as the event will start at 18:30 prompt.

Performance (MilkyMist)

via OSHUG

It stands to reason that hardware which is open to being studied, modified and improved would be well suited to performance environments, and just as F/OSS has proved popular in support of creative practices so is OSHW similarly gaining favour. With designs ranging from simple electronic instruments that make for an ideal first electronics project to vastly more complex processing and synthesis devices.

At the eighth OSHUG meeting we'll be hearing about the Milkymist™ project which "develops a comprehensive open source solution for the live synthesis of interactive visual effects for VJs (video performance artists)".

MilkyMist - An FPGA-based open-hardware video synthesis platform

The MilkyMist project develops a stand-alone device in a small form factor that is capable of rendering MilkDrop-esque visuals effects in real time, with a high level of interaction with many sensors and using live audio and video streams as a base. The flexibility of the FPGA used as a central component enables advanced users to modify the design, and also permits compact integration of many interfaces (Ethernet, OSC, MIDI, DMX512, video inputs, GPIO, VGA output, USB, Irda ...), making Milkymist™ a platform of choice for the mobile VJ. But Milkymist™ is more than a visual synthesizer - it is also one of the leading open source system-on-chip designs. It is today the fastest open source system-on-chip capable of running Linux, and it comes with an extensive set of features and graphics accelerators. The IP cores that make up the system-on-chip are entirely written in open source synthesizable Verilog HDL and come with test benches and documentation, which makes Milkymist™ a great library of re-usable logic cores to serve as a base for other open source hardware.

Yann Sionneau is a twenty two year old Frenchman and soon to be graduated from the telecommunication and networking engineering school Télécom SudParis. His current interests in the main are low level software development, FPGA design, embedded systems and networks. He read his first C language book when he was 12 and fell in love with the language. He met Sebastien Bourdeauducq (aka lekernel), leader of the Milkymist project, in 2008 while doing whilst an intern at a startup co-founded by Sebastien. He ported RTEMS to Milkymist as part of the Google Summer of Code 2010 program and has been following the project for some time.

Note: Please aim to arrive for 18:00 - 18:15 as the event will start at 18:30 prompt.

Radio (HPSDR)

via OSHUG

Radio spectrum is a finite resource and it should therefore come as no surprise that radio systems are a particularly hot area of research. Whilst ever more advanced schemes for modulation, digital encoding and spectrum access promise increased efficiency, step upgrades more often than not require new hardware. As has been evidenced in the evolution of mobile telephony from analogue to GSM and 2.5G (GPRS) to 3G, and similarly in the evolution of wireless computer networks. A disruptive development in radio technology promises to change this and to bring an unprecedented flexibility to radio systems, and one similar to that which programming brought to the task of machine computation. Despite, or perhaps due to being at the cutting edge there are a number of open source hardware projects concerned with developing software-defined radio (SDR) technology. As with the earliest developments in radio systems radio amateurs are once again at the forefront, and at this month's meeting we will have a presentation on the comprehensive HPSDR platform.

HPSDR - High Performance Software Defined Radio

HPSDR is an open source (GNU type) hardware and software project intended as the "next generation" software-defined radio for radio amateurs and shortwave listeners. It is being developed by a group of software-defined radio enthusiasts around the world, and in a modular hardware fashion to help promote experimentation by both hardware and software developers.

John Melton has held an amateur radio license since 1984 when he was first licensed as N6LYT while living and working in California, and he was assigned the UK callsign of G0ORX on moving back to the UK. He became interested in developing open source software in 1990 with the launch of AMSAT Oscar 16, an amateur radio satellite with a store and forward messaging payload. He developed an open source software package to communicate with the satellite that ran on Linux (pre 1.0) and subsequently wrote an open source fully automated satellite ground station software package in Java. John has been a software engineer since 1970 when he was employed by Burroughs Corporation, and for the last 14 years he has worked for Sun Microsystems who were acquired by Oracle this year.

slides [PDF]

Open Discussion - Ideas for Future Meetings

Themes, speakers, venues - it's all up for grabs! Have your say and help shape future OSHUG meetings. Offer to present, suggest a speaker or sit quietly until it's time to cross the road to the pub...

Community (mbed, DesignSpark, London Hackspace)

via OSHUG

As with open source software, the development of open source hardware is characterised by not only liberal licensing but by communities that engage in open, collaborative development. For the fourth meeting we'll be joined by speakers from three hardware communities, and gaining an insight into their operation and the motivations of the various stakeholders involved, whilst considering what open source hardware means to them.

mbed - Rapid Prototyping for Microcontrollers

Microcontrollers are getting cheaper, more powerful and more flexible, but there remains a barrier to a host of new applications; someone has to build the first prototype. There is no reason why it has to be so hard, but without the right tools, it really is. So mbed has tackled this by being a tool for the sole purpose of developing prototypes. We haven't had to dumb down the technology; it's all built on industry standard stuff. We've just done a lot of the groundwork for you, and made the trade-offs and choices appropriate for the task, so you don't have to. With the right tools for the job, you'll be more adventurous, inventive and productive. But best of all, you'll love building things with microcontrollers again. We built it for ourelves really!

Chris Styles graduated from Imperial College in 1996 with a degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering. After a few years spent gaining a range of experience in the industry, he joined ARM as an application engineer. For six years he helped numerous ARM partners around the world through the process of turning IP into silicon, supporting them by email and through working onsite at their offices. For the last three years Chris has been a part of a small team developing mbed. The original idea was conceived between Chris and Simon Ford as they both struggled to resolve their frustrations with applying ARM microcontroller technology outside of the embedded profession.

DesignSpark - The gateway to online resources and design support for engineers

DesignSpark is an interactive and social community for electronic design engineers. It allows members to share information and ideas, network with industry experts and partners, read and create reviews, gain and share knowledge and the opportunity to peruse a whole host of development kits. It also hosts the Spark Store, which provides free (as in beer) tools such as DesignSpark PCB for community members to download.

Lee Stacey is community manager at DesignSpark and was formerly an electronics engineer with Beyerdynamic, specialising in audio amplification and processing.

London Hackspace

The London Hackspace is a non-profit, community-run hacker space in central London. It provides a space where people who make things can come to share tools and knowledge.

Tom Doran (London Hackspace)

Arduino: An Open Source Hardware Success Story

via OSHUG

For the third meeting we'll be asking the question "what factors contribute to the success of an open source hardware project?", and using Arduino and derivatives LilyPad Arduino and the concurrency.cc board as the basis for an informal case study

Current Cost Bridge - an Arduino based, hackable consumer device

The Current Cost Bridge was developed using the open-source Arduino platform. The reason for using Arduino, was to speed up the development process of the bridge, allowing for fast prototyping and producing a hackable device

Chris Dalby (twitter) is Lead Software Developer at Current Cost Ltd with over 10 years experience in software development and network infrastructure. Chris joined Current Cost in December 2009 to develop desktop and web based software for the Current Cost monitor range.

Chris Dalby and Paul Downey talking about the Current Cost Bridge from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Concurrency.cc - parallel programming for makers and artists

The concurrency.cc project describes itself as "a group of educators and researchers exploring the development of tools that make parallel programming more accessible to more people. Our hope is that concurrency.cc will serve the community of developers surrounding parallel and concurrent languages on the Arduino and other low-cost embedded platforms."

Adam Sampson is a research associate in the field of concurrent programming and complex systems simulation at the University of Kent. He has enjoyed electronics as a hobby ever since being told off for dismantling the family vacuum cleaner as a small child.

Omer Kilic (twitter) is a research student at the University of Kent working on dynamically reconfigurable architectures and embedded systems. He is passionate about the open-source hardware movement and likes tinkering, so much so that he founded TinkerSoc, The University of Kent Tinkering Society

Adam Sampson demonstrates a pair of concurrencyCC devices running an Occam driven LED display from Paul Downey on flickr

Adam Sampson and Omer Kilic talking with Dj Walker-Morgan after #oshug from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

LilyPad - an Arduino based platform for wearables and e-textiles

The LilyPad Arduino is a microcontroller, plus a set of sewable electronic components designed so they can be put together to create interactive wearables or textiles based artworks. There is quite a range of components such as LEDS, sensors, buzzer, accelerometer and more that can be connected with conductive thread. The board is based on the ATmega168V/328Vand was designed and developed by Leah Buechley and SparkFun Electronics.

Rain Ashford (twitter) is Senior Producer at BBC Learning where she is presently across the BBC's Media Literacy supertopic portal. During her 10 years at the BBC she has developed and produced many of the BBC's high priority sites and online activities. Passionate about technology, she recently started a Women in Technology network for her colleagues to discuss careers, training, raising their profile and encouraging women to look at careers in tech. She previously worked for BBC R&D as a Technologist where she worked on the groundbreaking R&DTV project and the BBC's developer network, BBC Backstage, she's a hardware hacker, coder, artist, gamer and blogger.

Rain Ashford talking about Arduino and open source hardware from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Open Hardware Licensing and Models for Sustainability

via OSHUG

For our second meeting we've presentations from Andrew Katz on licensing Open Source Hardware projects and a representative from Pay It Forward on Altruistic 3D printing using RepRap.

Free and open source software is mainstream. Free and open hardware isn't.

Andrew is increasingly involved in open hardware, and considers what, if anything, is different about hardware which makes open projects a challenge, and whether it is possible to construct a licence, like the GPL, which has a copyleft element applicable to hardware.

Andrew Katz is a partner at Moorcrofts LLP, a boutique law firm in England's Thames Valley and advises a wide range of businesses on free and open source related issues. He has lectured and published widely on the subject and is a founder editor of the International Free and Open Source Software Law Review. Before becoming a solicitor, he trained as a barrister, and moonlighted as a programmer during his studies at Bar School, programming in Turbo Pascal. He has released software under the GPL.

Copy Left Licensing & Hardware, Andrew Katz from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Andrew Back talking with Andrew Katz of Moorcrofts LLP from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Pay It Forward — Alturistic 3D Printing

Pay It Forward is a movement to bootstrap the thingiverse using RepStrap machines to print parts to help other people get started with RepRap machines.

Paul Downey chatting OSHUG with David Flanders from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.