Tag Archives: Osmosoft

Performance (MilkyMist)

via OSHUG

It stands to reason that hardware which is open to being studied, modified and improved would be well suited to performance environments, and just as F/OSS has proved popular in support of creative practices so is OSHW similarly gaining favour. With designs ranging from simple electronic instruments that make for an ideal first electronics project to vastly more complex processing and synthesis devices.

At the eighth OSHUG meeting we'll be hearing about the Milkymist™ project which "develops a comprehensive open source solution for the live synthesis of interactive visual effects for VJs (video performance artists)".

MilkyMist - An FPGA-based open-hardware video synthesis platform

The MilkyMist project develops a stand-alone device in a small form factor that is capable of rendering MilkDrop-esque visuals effects in real time, with a high level of interaction with many sensors and using live audio and video streams as a base. The flexibility of the FPGA used as a central component enables advanced users to modify the design, and also permits compact integration of many interfaces (Ethernet, OSC, MIDI, DMX512, video inputs, GPIO, VGA output, USB, Irda ...), making Milkymist™ a platform of choice for the mobile VJ. But Milkymist™ is more than a visual synthesizer - it is also one of the leading open source system-on-chip designs. It is today the fastest open source system-on-chip capable of running Linux, and it comes with an extensive set of features and graphics accelerators. The IP cores that make up the system-on-chip are entirely written in open source synthesizable Verilog HDL and come with test benches and documentation, which makes Milkymist™ a great library of re-usable logic cores to serve as a base for other open source hardware.

Yann Sionneau is a twenty two year old Frenchman and soon to be graduated from the telecommunication and networking engineering school Télécom SudParis. His current interests in the main are low level software development, FPGA design, embedded systems and networks. He read his first C language book when he was 12 and fell in love with the language. He met Sebastien Bourdeauducq (aka lekernel), leader of the Milkymist project, in 2008 while doing whilst an intern at a startup co-founded by Sebastien. He ported RTEMS to Milkymist as part of the Google Summer of Code 2010 program and has been following the project for some time.

Note: Please aim to arrive for 18:00 - 18:15 as the event will start at 18:30 prompt.

Performance (MilkyMist)

via OSHUG

It stands to reason that hardware which is open to being studied, modified and improved would be well suited to performance environments, and just as F/OSS has proved popular in support of creative practices so is OSHW similarly gaining favour. With designs ranging from simple electronic instruments that make for an ideal first electronics project to vastly more complex processing and synthesis devices.

At the eighth OSHUG meeting we'll be hearing about the Milkymist™ project which "develops a comprehensive open source solution for the live synthesis of interactive visual effects for VJs (video performance artists)".

MilkyMist - An FPGA-based open-hardware video synthesis platform

The MilkyMist project develops a stand-alone device in a small form factor that is capable of rendering MilkDrop-esque visuals effects in real time, with a high level of interaction with many sensors and using live audio and video streams as a base. The flexibility of the FPGA used as a central component enables advanced users to modify the design, and also permits compact integration of many interfaces (Ethernet, OSC, MIDI, DMX512, video inputs, GPIO, VGA output, USB, Irda ...), making Milkymist™ a platform of choice for the mobile VJ. But Milkymist™ is more than a visual synthesizer - it is also one of the leading open source system-on-chip designs. It is today the fastest open source system-on-chip capable of running Linux, and it comes with an extensive set of features and graphics accelerators. The IP cores that make up the system-on-chip are entirely written in open source synthesizable Verilog HDL and come with test benches and documentation, which makes Milkymist™ a great library of re-usable logic cores to serve as a base for other open source hardware.

Yann Sionneau is a twenty two year old Frenchman and soon to be graduated from the telecommunication and networking engineering school Télécom SudParis. His current interests in the main are low level software development, FPGA design, embedded systems and networks. He read his first C language book when he was 12 and fell in love with the language. He met Sebastien Bourdeauducq (aka lekernel), leader of the Milkymist project, in 2008 while doing whilst an intern at a startup co-founded by Sebastien. He ported RTEMS to Milkymist as part of the Google Summer of Code 2010 program and has been following the project for some time.

Note: Please aim to arrive for 18:00 - 18:15 as the event will start at 18:30 prompt.

Learning (BBC, Tinker London)

via OSHUG

The ability to study and improve the design of open source hardware is a core principle and it follows therefore that as a methodology it is well suited to learning environments. Community, collaboration and ecosystem are also central open source hardware, however, ambitious projects that embraced these principles existed long before its advent.

At the seventh OSHUG meeting we'll be hearing from ex-BBC employees that were intimately involved in the BBC's Computer Literacy Project, the creation of the BBC Micro and the Domesday project. First hand experiences from that heady time during the 1980s when the UK was at the forefront of microcomputer development will frame the opportunity that faces us once again. Whereas lessons learnt will help us to build on these experiences and to strive to ensure that pitfalls are avoided.

We will also be hearing from Tinker London about experiences of teaching open source technologies and how this differs from more traditional approaches to learning.

Kindly hosted by BBC Learning Development.

The BBC Computer Literacy Project

Why did the BBC embark on one of its most ambitious projects - the Computer Literacy Project - in 1982? What was the scene like then and how successful was the enterprise. What technical issues were involved? 85% of schools used BBC Micros and millions were sold, along with best selling books and software, including 'telesoftware'. What is the legacy - if at all? How did the work then benefit BBC technology now?

After being Head of Science at Beaumont and Stonyhurst Colleges, David Allen joined the BBC in 1969 as an Assistant producer/director. He became producer and then executive producer of a range of programmes. As a programme maker, he was series editor of the BBC Computer Literacy Project 1982-1986 and intimately connected with the creation of the BBC Microcomputer. He received seven awards (including the New York Film Festival, Sony Innovation awards, RTS Judges Award and Times Technology Programme of the Year two years running. With BBC R&D helped evolve radio cameras and virtual studio production. When David retired he was executive producer in Production Modernisation. He is currently making documentaries for BBC R&D and for Historic Royal Palaces.

The BBC Domesday Project - If I could Do it All Over Again

The BBC Domesday Project was an interactive media production made as part of celebrations of the 900th anniversary of William the Conqueror's Domesday Book of 1086. It was a technical triumph, combining digital data with analogue pictures, video and sound with an innovative user interface running on an 8-bit BBC Microcomputer controlling a state-of-the-art laser videodisc. 25 years later it has still not been possible to republish something that over a million people helped to make, and despite sometime heroic reclamation and preservation, it is still virtually impossible to access the original software. Andy Finney was one of the project founders and he produced some of the material in the project. He will explain the origins and technical background to the Domesday discs in the context of both it 1980s origins and how much of what it pioneered has since become commonplace.

Andy Finney started in radio and moved into television, video and interactive video within the BBC over a 21 year career. Since leaving he has concentrated on web-based technologies including databases, these days with a lean towards digital television reception. He worked with the then Public Record Office and the BBC to help preserve the audio-visual content of the Domesday discs and still keeps a fatherly eye out for re-publication.

Standing on the Shoulders of Hackers

Learning is an intrinsic aspect of open source projects. Practices such as documenting and sharing work, following one’s own interests, and ad hoc organizing open up - and complicate - opportunities for learning and teaching, especially in informal and semi-formal contexts. Drawing on his experiences teaching Arduino workshops, Daniel will talk about how both the hardware and open-source aspects of OSH affect processes and tools for learning and teaching.

Daniel Soltis is an interaction designer specializing in physical interfaces, play and games, and the rough edges where engineering, design, art, and learning meet. He has been working with Tinker London since 2008, studied physical computing and game design at NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program, and in prior life had various adventures in math and physics, teaching, editing, and medical writing. He has taught Arduino, Processing, and rapid prototyping for events and institutions including Thinking Digital, CIID, the V&A, and dConstruct, and has spoken about games and hardware at events including SXSW, the SIGGRAPH Video Game Symposium, Playful, and Open Hardware Camp.

Note: Please aim to arrive for 18:00 - 18:15 as the event will start at 18:30 prompt. Note also that the venue is the Media Centre at White City and not the main White City building itself! On arrival please report to reception.

Learning (BBC, Tinker London)

via OSHUG

The ability to study and improve the design of open source hardware is a core principle and it follows therefore that as a methodology it is well suited to learning environments. Community, collaboration and ecosystem are also central open source hardware, however, ambitious projects that embraced these principles existed long before its advent.

At the seventh OSHUG meeting we'll be hearing from ex-BBC employees that were intimately involved in the BBC's Computer Literacy Project, the creation of the BBC Micro and the Domesday project. First hand experiences from that heady time during the 1980s when the UK was at the forefront of microcomputer development will frame the opportunity that faces us once again. Whereas lessons learnt will help us to build on these experiences and to strive to ensure that pitfalls are avoided.

We will also be hearing from Tinker London about experiences of teaching open source technologies and how this differs from more traditional approaches to learning.

Kindly hosted by BBC Learning Development.

The BBC Computer Literacy Project

Why did the BBC embark on one of its most ambitious projects - the Computer Literacy Project - in 1982? What was the scene like then and how successful was the enterprise. What technical issues were involved? 85% of schools used BBC Micros and millions were sold, along with best selling books and software, including 'telesoftware'. What is the legacy - if at all? How did the work then benefit BBC technology now?

After being Head of Science at Beaumont and Stonyhurst Colleges, David Allen joined the BBC in 1969 as an Assistant producer/director. He became producer and then executive producer of a range of programmes. As a programme maker, he was series editor of the BBC Computer Literacy Project 1982-1986 and intimately connected with the creation of the BBC Microcomputer. He received seven awards (including the New York Film Festival, Sony Innovation awards, RTS Judges Award and Times Technology Programme of the Year two years running. With BBC R&D helped evolve radio cameras and virtual studio production. When David retired he was executive producer in Production Modernisation. He is currently making documentaries for BBC R&D and for Historic Royal Palaces.

The BBC Domesday Project - If I could Do it All Over Again

The BBC Domesday Project was an interactive media production made as part of celebrations of the 900th anniversary of William the Conqueror's Domesday Book of 1086. It was a technical triumph, combining digital data with analogue pictures, video and sound with an innovative user interface running on an 8-bit BBC Microcomputer controlling a state-of-the-art laser videodisc. 25 years later it has still not been possible to republish something that over a million people helped to make, and despite sometime heroic reclamation and preservation, it is still virtually impossible to access the original software. Andy Finney was one of the project founders and he produced some of the material in the project. He will explain the origins and technical background to the Domesday discs in the context of both it 1980s origins and how much of what it pioneered has since become commonplace.

Andy Finney started in radio and moved into television, video and interactive video within the BBC over a 21 year career. Since leaving he has concentrated on web-based technologies including databases, these days with a lean towards digital television reception. He worked with the then Public Record Office and the BBC to help preserve the audio-visual content of the Domesday discs and still keeps a fatherly eye out for re-publication.

Standing on the Shoulders of Hackers

Learning is an intrinsic aspect of open source projects. Practices such as documenting and sharing work, following one’s own interests, and ad hoc organizing open up - and complicate - opportunities for learning and teaching, especially in informal and semi-formal contexts. Drawing on his experiences teaching Arduino workshops, Daniel will talk about how both the hardware and open-source aspects of OSH affect processes and tools for learning and teaching.

Daniel Soltis is an interaction designer specializing in physical interfaces, play and games, and the rough edges where engineering, design, art, and learning meet. He has been working with Tinker London since 2008, studied physical computing and game design at NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program, and in prior life had various adventures in math and physics, teaching, editing, and medical writing. He has taught Arduino, Processing, and rapid prototyping for events and institutions including Thinking Digital, CIID, the V&A, and dConstruct, and has spoken about games and hardware at events including SXSW, the SIGGRAPH Video Game Symposium, Playful, and Open Hardware Camp.

Note: Please aim to arrive for 18:00 - 18:15 as the event will start at 18:30 prompt. Note also that the venue is the Media Centre at White City and not the main White City building itself! On arrival please report to reception.

At Home (Tacticalendar, Denkimono Clock)

via OSHUG

Open source hardware is not just about catering for niche applications and marginal use cases and many projects are concerned with creating devices for everyday use. For the sixth OSHUG meeting we'll have presentations on two projects targeted at the home and one that doesn't even involve electricity!

Tacticalendar

Tacticalendar is an open design project for a timeless 4-week-ahead rolling planner. New versions are managed through a github issue-tracker, laser cut from plywood and acrylic, articulated with duct tape, offered at a discount to release candidate testers and finally shared with premium customers. A continually evolving product, it is the first to market from the Enigmaker.org open prototyping experiment - a two-month project to prototype an invention every week in the public domain. Patent protection has been rejected in favour of a share-alike design and an open innovation community. Near-term feature testing includes Google Calendar synchronization using machine-vision and augmented-reality techniques.

Cefn Hoile sculpts open source hardware and software, and supports others doing the same. Drawing on ten years of experience in R&D for a multinational technology company, he works as a public domain inventor through Enigmaker.org, and an innovation catalyst and architect of bespoke digital installations and prototypes, working most recently with Tinker.it, BT, the BBC, EDF, Nokia. Cefn is a founder-member of the CuriosityCollective.org digital arts group, and a regular contributor to open source projects and not-for-profits.

slides [jpegs]

Denkimono Clock

TheDenkimono Clock is a kit to build a countdown timer, fully functional alarm clock and stopwatch, that is not only fun to build but that also provides a practical device for everyday use. This talk will cover the initial design and build as a personal hobby project, to its redesign as a commercial kit and the associated sales, marketing and after-sales service. Initial concerns over open sourcing and how these turned out to be unfounded will also be covered.

Mark Longstaff-Tyrrell trained as an electronics engineer and was seduced by the money and glamour of software and began his career writing code for fruit machines in a shed in Wolverhampton. He subsequently progressed to developing for mobile handsets with extendible aerials in the late 90s, and then for stylus driven PDAs and currently develops software for Android devices.

slides [PDF]

Lightning Talks

Take the stage for five minutes and tell us all about your open hardware home hacks!

At Home (Tacticalendar, Denkimono Clock)

via OSHUG

Open source hardware is not just about catering for niche applications and marginal use cases and many projects are concerned with creating devices for everyday use. For the sixth OSHUG meeting we'll have presentations on two projects targeted at the home and one that doesn't even involve electricity!

Tacticalendar

Tacticalendar is an open design project for a timeless 4-week-ahead rolling planner. New versions are managed through a github issue-tracker, laser cut from plywood and acrylic, articulated with duct tape, offered at a discount to release candidate testers and finally shared with premium customers. A continually evolving product, it is the first to market from the Enigmaker.org open prototyping experiment - a two-month project to prototype an invention every week in the public domain. Patent protection has been rejected in favour of a share-alike design and an open innovation community. Near-term feature testing includes Google Calendar synchronization using machine-vision and augmented-reality techniques.

Cefn Hoile sculpts open source hardware and software, and supports others doing the same. Drawing on ten years of experience in R&D for a multinational technology company, he works as a public domain inventor through Enigmaker.org, and an innovation catalyst and architect of bespoke digital installations and prototypes, working most recently with Tinker.it, BT, the BBC, EDF, Nokia. Cefn is a founder-member of the CuriosityCollective.org digital arts group, and a regular contributor to open source projects and not-for-profits.

slides [jpegs]

Denkimono Clock

TheDenkimono Clock is a kit to build a countdown timer, fully functional alarm clock and stopwatch, that is not only fun to build but that also provides a practical device for everyday use. This talk will cover the initial design and build as a personal hobby project, to its redesign as a commercial kit and the associated sales, marketing and after-sales service. Initial concerns over open sourcing and how these turned out to be unfounded will also be covered.

Mark Longstaff-Tyrrell trained as an electronics engineer and was seduced by the money and glamour of software and began his career writing code for fruit machines in a shed in Wolverhampton. He subsequently progressed to developing for mobile handsets with extendible aerials in the late 90s, and then for stylus driven PDAs and currently develops software for Android devices.

slides [PDF]

Lightning Talks

Take the stage for five minutes and tell us all about your open hardware home hacks!

Radio (HPSDR)

via OSHUG

Radio spectrum is a finite resource and it should therefore come as no surprise that radio systems are a particularly hot area of research. Whilst ever more advanced schemes for modulation, digital encoding and spectrum access promise increased efficiency, step upgrades more often than not require new hardware. As has been evidenced in the evolution of mobile telephony from analogue to GSM and 2.5G (GPRS) to 3G, and similarly in the evolution of wireless computer networks. A disruptive development in radio technology promises to change this and to bring an unprecedented flexibility to radio systems, and one similar to that which programming brought to the task of machine computation. Despite, or perhaps due to being at the cutting edge there are a number of open source hardware projects concerned with developing software-defined radio (SDR) technology. As with the earliest developments in radio systems radio amateurs are once again at the forefront, and at this month's meeting we will have a presentation on the comprehensive HPSDR platform.

HPSDR - High Performance Software Defined Radio

HPSDR is an open source (GNU type) hardware and software project intended as the "next generation" software-defined radio for radio amateurs and shortwave listeners. It is being developed by a group of software-defined radio enthusiasts around the world, and in a modular hardware fashion to help promote experimentation by both hardware and software developers.

John Melton has held an amateur radio license since 1984 when he was first licensed as N6LYT while living and working in California, and he was assigned the UK callsign of G0ORX on moving back to the UK. He became interested in developing open source software in 1990 with the launch of AMSAT Oscar 16, an amateur radio satellite with a store and forward messaging payload. He developed an open source software package to communicate with the satellite that ran on Linux (pre 1.0) and subsequently wrote an open source fully automated satellite ground station software package in Java. John has been a software engineer since 1970 when he was employed by Burroughs Corporation, and for the last 14 years he has worked for Sun Microsystems who were acquired by Oracle this year.

slides [PDF]

Open Discussion - Ideas for Future Meetings

Themes, speakers, venues - it's all up for grabs! Have your say and help shape future OSHUG meetings. Offer to present, suggest a speaker or sit quietly until it's time to cross the road to the pub...

Radio (HPSDR)

via OSHUG

Radio spectrum is a finite resource and it should therefore come as no surprise that radio systems are a particularly hot area of research. Whilst ever more advanced schemes for modulation, digital encoding and spectrum access promise increased efficiency, step upgrades more often than not require new hardware. As has been evidenced in the evolution of mobile telephony from analogue to GSM and 2.5G (GPRS) to 3G, and similarly in the evolution of wireless computer networks. A disruptive development in radio technology promises to change this and to bring an unprecedented flexibility to radio systems, and one similar to that which programming brought to the task of machine computation. Despite, or perhaps due to being at the cutting edge there are a number of open source hardware projects concerned with developing software-defined radio (SDR) technology. As with the earliest developments in radio systems radio amateurs are once again at the forefront, and at this month's meeting we will have a presentation on the comprehensive HPSDR platform.

HPSDR - High Performance Software Defined Radio

HPSDR is an open source (GNU type) hardware and software project intended as the "next generation" software-defined radio for radio amateurs and shortwave listeners. It is being developed by a group of software-defined radio enthusiasts around the world, and in a modular hardware fashion to help promote experimentation by both hardware and software developers.

John Melton has held an amateur radio license since 1984 when he was first licensed as N6LYT while living and working in California, and he was assigned the UK callsign of G0ORX on moving back to the UK. He became interested in developing open source software in 1990 with the launch of AMSAT Oscar 16, an amateur radio satellite with a store and forward messaging payload. He developed an open source software package to communicate with the satellite that ran on Linux (pre 1.0) and subsequently wrote an open source fully automated satellite ground station software package in Java. John has been a software engineer since 1970 when he was employed by Burroughs Corporation, and for the last 14 years he has worked for Sun Microsystems who were acquired by Oracle this year.

slides [PDF]

Open Discussion - Ideas for Future Meetings

Themes, speakers, venues - it's all up for grabs! Have your say and help shape future OSHUG meetings. Offer to present, suggest a speaker or sit quietly until it's time to cross the road to the pub...

Community (mbed, DesignSpark, London Hackspace)

via OSHUG

As with open source software, the development of open source hardware is characterised by not only liberal licensing but by communities that engage in open, collaborative development. For the fourth meeting we'll be joined by speakers from three hardware communities, and gaining an insight into their operation and the motivations of the various stakeholders involved, whilst considering what open source hardware means to them.

mbed - Rapid Prototyping for Microcontrollers

Microcontrollers are getting cheaper, more powerful and more flexible, but there remains a barrier to a host of new applications; someone has to build the first prototype. There is no reason why it has to be so hard, but without the right tools, it really is. So mbed has tackled this by being a tool for the sole purpose of developing prototypes. We haven't had to dumb down the technology; it's all built on industry standard stuff. We've just done a lot of the groundwork for you, and made the trade-offs and choices appropriate for the task, so you don't have to. With the right tools for the job, you'll be more adventurous, inventive and productive. But best of all, you'll love building things with microcontrollers again. We built it for ourelves really!

Chris Styles graduated from Imperial College in 1996 with a degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering. After a few years spent gaining a range of experience in the industry, he joined ARM as an application engineer. For six years he helped numerous ARM partners around the world through the process of turning IP into silicon, supporting them by email and through working onsite at their offices. For the last three years Chris has been a part of a small team developing mbed. The original idea was conceived between Chris and Simon Ford as they both struggled to resolve their frustrations with applying ARM microcontroller technology outside of the embedded profession.

DesignSpark - The gateway to online resources and design support for engineers

DesignSpark is an interactive and social community for electronic design engineers. It allows members to share information and ideas, network with industry experts and partners, read and create reviews, gain and share knowledge and the opportunity to peruse a whole host of development kits. It also hosts the Spark Store, which provides free (as in beer) tools such as DesignSpark PCB for community members to download.

Lee Stacey is community manager at DesignSpark and was formerly an electronics engineer with Beyerdynamic, specialising in audio amplification and processing.

London Hackspace

The London Hackspace is a non-profit, community-run hacker space in central London. It provides a space where people who make things can come to share tools and knowledge.

Tom Doran (London Hackspace)

Community (mbed, DesignSpark, London Hackspace)

via OSHUG

As with open source software, the development of open source hardware is characterised by not only liberal licensing but by communities that engage in open, collaborative development. For the fourth meeting we'll be joined by speakers from three hardware communities, and gaining an insight into their operation and the motivations of the various stakeholders involved, whilst considering what open source hardware means to them.

mbed - Rapid Prototyping for Microcontrollers

Microcontrollers are getting cheaper, more powerful and more flexible, but there remains a barrier to a host of new applications; someone has to build the first prototype. There is no reason why it has to be so hard, but without the right tools, it really is. So mbed has tackled this by being a tool for the sole purpose of developing prototypes. We haven't had to dumb down the technology; it's all built on industry standard stuff. We've just done a lot of the groundwork for you, and made the trade-offs and choices appropriate for the task, so you don't have to. With the right tools for the job, you'll be more adventurous, inventive and productive. But best of all, you'll love building things with microcontrollers again. We built it for ourelves really!

Chris Styles graduated from Imperial College in 1996 with a degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering. After a few years spent gaining a range of experience in the industry, he joined ARM as an application engineer. For six years he helped numerous ARM partners around the world through the process of turning IP into silicon, supporting them by email and through working onsite at their offices. For the last three years Chris has been a part of a small team developing mbed. The original idea was conceived between Chris and Simon Ford as they both struggled to resolve their frustrations with applying ARM microcontroller technology outside of the embedded profession.

DesignSpark - The gateway to online resources and design support for engineers

DesignSpark is an interactive and social community for electronic design engineers. It allows members to share information and ideas, network with industry experts and partners, read and create reviews, gain and share knowledge and the opportunity to peruse a whole host of development kits. It also hosts the Spark Store, which provides free (as in beer) tools such as DesignSpark PCB for community members to download.

Lee Stacey is community manager at DesignSpark and was formerly an electronics engineer with Beyerdynamic, specialising in audio amplification and processing.

London Hackspace

The London Hackspace is a non-profit, community-run hacker space in central London. It provides a space where people who make things can come to share tools and knowledge.

Tom Doran (London Hackspace)

Arduino: An Open Source Hardware Success Story

via OSHUG

For the third meeting we'll be asking the question "what factors contribute to the success of an open source hardware project?", and using Arduino and derivatives LilyPad Arduino and the concurrency.cc board as the basis for an informal case study

Current Cost Bridge - an Arduino based, hackable consumer device

The Current Cost Bridge was developed using the open-source Arduino platform. The reason for using Arduino, was to speed up the development process of the bridge, allowing for fast prototyping and producing a hackable device

Chris Dalby (twitter) is Lead Software Developer at Current Cost Ltd with over 10 years experience in software development and network infrastructure. Chris joined Current Cost in December 2009 to develop desktop and web based software for the Current Cost monitor range.

Chris Dalby and Paul Downey talking about the Current Cost Bridge from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Concurrency.cc - parallel programming for makers and artists

The concurrency.cc project describes itself as "a group of educators and researchers exploring the development of tools that make parallel programming more accessible to more people. Our hope is that concurrency.cc will serve the community of developers surrounding parallel and concurrent languages on the Arduino and other low-cost embedded platforms."

Adam Sampson is a research associate in the field of concurrent programming and complex systems simulation at the University of Kent. He has enjoyed electronics as a hobby ever since being told off for dismantling the family vacuum cleaner as a small child.

Omer Kilic (twitter) is a research student at the University of Kent working on dynamically reconfigurable architectures and embedded systems. He is passionate about the open-source hardware movement and likes tinkering, so much so that he founded TinkerSoc, The University of Kent Tinkering Society

Adam Sampson demonstrates a pair of concurrencyCC devices running an Occam driven LED display from Paul Downey on flickr

Adam Sampson and Omer Kilic talking with Dj Walker-Morgan after #oshug from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

LilyPad - an Arduino based platform for wearables and e-textiles

The LilyPad Arduino is a microcontroller, plus a set of sewable electronic components designed so they can be put together to create interactive wearables or textiles based artworks. There is quite a range of components such as LEDS, sensors, buzzer, accelerometer and more that can be connected with conductive thread. The board is based on the ATmega168V/328Vand was designed and developed by Leah Buechley and SparkFun Electronics.

Rain Ashford (twitter) is Senior Producer at BBC Learning where she is presently across the BBC's Media Literacy supertopic portal. During her 10 years at the BBC she has developed and produced many of the BBC's high priority sites and online activities. Passionate about technology, she recently started a Women in Technology network for her colleagues to discuss careers, training, raising their profile and encouraging women to look at careers in tech. She previously worked for BBC R&D as a Technologist where she worked on the groundbreaking R&DTV project and the BBC's developer network, BBC Backstage, she's a hardware hacker, coder, artist, gamer and blogger.

Rain Ashford talking about Arduino and open source hardware from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Arduino: An Open Source Hardware Success Story

via OSHUG

For the third meeting we'll be asking the question "what factors contribute to the success of an open source hardware project?", and using Arduino and derivatives LilyPad Arduino and the concurrency.cc board as the basis for an informal case study

Current Cost Bridge - an Arduino based, hackable consumer device

The Current Cost Bridge was developed using the open-source Arduino platform. The reason for using Arduino, was to speed up the development process of the bridge, allowing for fast prototyping and producing a hackable device

Chris Dalby (twitter) is Lead Software Developer at Current Cost Ltd with over 10 years experience in software development and network infrastructure. Chris joined Current Cost in December 2009 to develop desktop and web based software for the Current Cost monitor range.

Chris Dalby and Paul Downey talking about the Current Cost Bridge from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Concurrency.cc - parallel programming for makers and artists

The concurrency.cc project describes itself as "a group of educators and researchers exploring the development of tools that make parallel programming more accessible to more people. Our hope is that concurrency.cc will serve the community of developers surrounding parallel and concurrent languages on the Arduino and other low-cost embedded platforms."

Adam Sampson is a research associate in the field of concurrent programming and complex systems simulation at the University of Kent. He has enjoyed electronics as a hobby ever since being told off for dismantling the family vacuum cleaner as a small child.

Omer Kilic (twitter) is a research student at the University of Kent working on dynamically reconfigurable architectures and embedded systems. He is passionate about the open-source hardware movement and likes tinkering, so much so that he founded TinkerSoc, The University of Kent Tinkering Society

Adam Sampson demonstrates a pair of concurrencyCC devices running an Occam driven LED display from Paul Downey on flickr

Adam Sampson and Omer Kilic talking with Dj Walker-Morgan after #oshug from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

LilyPad - an Arduino based platform for wearables and e-textiles

The LilyPad Arduino is a microcontroller, plus a set of sewable electronic components designed so they can be put together to create interactive wearables or textiles based artworks. There is quite a range of components such as LEDS, sensors, buzzer, accelerometer and more that can be connected with conductive thread. The board is based on the ATmega168V/328Vand was designed and developed by Leah Buechley and SparkFun Electronics.

Rain Ashford (twitter) is Senior Producer at BBC Learning where she is presently across the BBC's Media Literacy supertopic portal. During her 10 years at the BBC she has developed and produced many of the BBC's high priority sites and online activities. Passionate about technology, she recently started a Women in Technology network for her colleagues to discuss careers, training, raising their profile and encouraging women to look at careers in tech. She previously worked for BBC R&D as a Technologist where she worked on the groundbreaking R&DTV project and the BBC's developer network, BBC Backstage, she's a hardware hacker, coder, artist, gamer and blogger.

Rain Ashford talking about Arduino and open source hardware from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Open Hardware Licensing and Models for Sustainability

via OSHUG

For our second meeting we've presentations from Andrew Katz on licensing Open Source Hardware projects and a representative from Pay It Forward on Altruistic 3D printing using RepRap.

Free and open source software is mainstream. Free and open hardware isn't.

Andrew is increasingly involved in open hardware, and considers what, if anything, is different about hardware which makes open projects a challenge, and whether it is possible to construct a licence, like the GPL, which has a copyleft element applicable to hardware.

Andrew Katz is a partner at Moorcrofts LLP, a boutique law firm in England's Thames Valley and advises a wide range of businesses on free and open source related issues. He has lectured and published widely on the subject and is a founder editor of the International Free and Open Source Software Law Review. Before becoming a solicitor, he trained as a barrister, and moonlighted as a programmer during his studies at Bar School, programming in Turbo Pascal. He has released software under the GPL.

Copy Left Licensing & Hardware, Andrew Katz from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Andrew Back talking with Andrew Katz of Moorcrofts LLP from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Pay It Forward — Alturistic 3D Printing

Pay It Forward is a movement to bootstrap the thingiverse using RepStrap machines to print parts to help other people get started with RepRap machines.

Paul Downey chatting OSHUG with David Flanders from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Open Hardware Licensing and Models for Sustainability

via OSHUG

For our second meeting we've presentations from Andrew Katz on licensing Open Source Hardware projects and a representative from Pay It Forward on Altruistic 3D printing using RepRap.

Free and open source software is mainstream. Free and open hardware isn't.

Andrew is increasingly involved in open hardware, and considers what, if anything, is different about hardware which makes open projects a challenge, and whether it is possible to construct a licence, like the GPL, which has a copyleft element applicable to hardware.

Andrew Katz is a partner at Moorcrofts LLP, a boutique law firm in England's Thames Valley and advises a wide range of businesses on free and open source related issues. He has lectured and published widely on the subject and is a founder editor of the International Free and Open Source Software Law Review. Before becoming a solicitor, he trained as a barrister, and moonlighted as a programmer during his studies at Bar School, programming in Turbo Pascal. He has released software under the GPL.

Copy Left Licensing & Hardware, Andrew Katz from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Andrew Back talking with Andrew Katz of Moorcrofts LLP from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Pay It Forward — Alturistic 3D Printing

Pay It Forward is a movement to bootstrap the thingiverse using RepStrap machines to print parts to help other people get started with RepRap machines.

Paul Downey chatting OSHUG with David Flanders from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

An introduction to the XMOS XCore XS1 and Amino

via OSHUG

For the inaugural event we are fortunate to have presentations from Prof. David May FRS, CTO of XMOS Semiconductor, and Alan Wood of Folknology Labs.

XMOS XCore XS1

XMOS is a fabless semiconductor company that develops multi-core multi-threaded processors designed to execute several real-time tasks, DSP, and control flow all at once. XMOS coined the term software-defined silicon, and this can be seen as midway between FPGA and MCU. However, unlike an FPGA there is no requirement for a complex HDL toolchain, and C and C++ can be employed in development, with XMOS extensions to C for concurrency (XC).

David May will be known to many as architect of the transputer and author of the concurrent programming language, occam. As co-founder and chief technical officer of XMOS Semiconductor, he will be presenting an introduction to the XCore XS1 microprocessor architecture and the associated development environment.

Open Source Hardware User Group - Prof. David May, XMOS from Matt Lucht on Vimeo.

Amino

Amino (Folknology Labs) is a networked creator tool for hardware and software production. XMOS software-defined silicon technology serves to blur the line between software and hardware, and Amino uses this technology to further blur the line between prototyping and production. Amino is also Internet native, event driven and optimised for concurrency, and may be seen as a building block for networked open source hardware creation.

Alan Wood - a.k.a. Folknology — originally trained in systems engineering, got lost in software engineering and open source for a decade, before returning back to his hardware roots via the open source hardware and makers movement that has gathered momentum over the last few years.

Al's interest lay in pushing the envelope for open source hardware/software production and agility: "We are approaching a tipping point where open source and open creation physically changes the real world not just the virtual world. With Amino we are selling a creative tool, not a finished product. We are selling possibilities. The participant decides what runs on it, not us. We just give them as much as we can to help them through that process."