Tag Archives: PIC

Get ready for MPLAB Express, throw away your Arduino

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Chas from iradan.com writes:

I credit the maker movement with bringing electronics back from the crusty old and lonely electronics hobby back into the main stream. The Arduino is the micro of choice for this army of makers and I conceded it made sense… you install the IDE, plugged in your board into the USB port and a couple clicks later and you have an LED blinking.. the most exciting blinking LED you’d ever seen in most cases. I stuck with the PIC micros because I didn’t see any need to put back on the training wheels.
I got invited to a conference call earlier this week as they rolled out MPLAB Express. I almost passed the email up as spam, I’m glad I didn’t… a quick half hour later and I was in shock. Microchip is now relevant in the hobbyist realm.. They just leapfrogged over Arduino in usability for the beginner. They just released Microchip MPLAB Express a new, free, online cloud-IDE. Write your code (or pick a sample), press the compile button and the .hex file downloads.. DRAG AND DROP the .hex file on to the dev board. … the dev board looks like a plain flash drive… just drag and drop and the code is automatically programmed to the device… DRAG AND DROP.. brilliant.

Details at iradan.com homepage.

Automatic monitor brightness controller

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Dilshan Jayakody writes:

This is an automatic “monitor brightness controller” based on environmental light conditions. This system use USB port base sensor unit to measure the light level and control monitor brightness accordingly. We design this system to reduce the eye stress by matching the monitor brightness with environmental lighting.

Project info at Dilshan Jayakody’s blog.

Indestructibles: The Lure of Tube Audio Equipment

via Nuts and Volts

My Sony integrated amp with copper chassis and huge toroidal transformers was a tour de force in my audio setup before the power mains took an indirect lightning hit. Because the microcontroller was fried, I couldn’t even get the unit to power up.

Without access to spare parts — including a new microcontroller assembly — I was at the mercy of factory certified technicians. And — because the unit was just out of warranty — I was going to be out $100 plus shipping in order to get an estimate on the repair.

10A Variac Soft Starter

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Steve Gardner did a repair of a 10A Carroll & Meynell Variac and documented the whole process on his blog:

I recently purchased a used 10A Carroll & Meynell Variac from eBay for use in the lab, however the variac often caused the 32A B-curve MCB in the consumer unit to trip due to the high inrush current of the variac core. To prevent this from happening and to add a few additional features I created the soft start circuit outlined on this page.
The idea of the soft start circuit is to limit the inrush current whilst the variac core is first magnetising. There are many ways to achieve this and most involve adding some form of resistive element in series with the transformer to prevent the transformer appearing as a very low impedance to the mains AC supply.

The method used in this project was to use a high power resistor in series with the transformer to limit the current. Once the current has settled, the resistor is shorted out by a relay to then allow the full load current of the variac to be drawn from the mains.

More details at SDG Electronics.

Check out the video after the break.

Geiger counter with SBM20 tube

via Dangerous Prototypes

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j3tstream writes:

I “rebuild” my Geiger counter, the SBM-20 tube was initially inside the box, i have put this one inside a 32mm diam plastic tube, for more convenience, wired through a XLR3 cable. This counter is from “Electronique-Pratique” n°368, a french electronic magazine. Shem, pcb, and PIC hex & C source code available.

More details at Weird-Lab blog.

PIC32 Tic-Tac-Toe: Demonstration of using touch-screen, TFT and the Protothreads threading library

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Tahmid writes:

I had previously used the Adafruit TFT display using my library (ported from the Adafruit Arduino library). I decided to optimize the library to improve drawing speed. The same display I use comes with a 4-wire resistive touch-screen as well. I decided to write a simple library for the touch-screen and give Protothreads a try. To incorporate all this, I thought it would be cool if I used these to make a simple game. Tic-tac-toe came to mind as a fun little demo.

Project info at Tahmid’s blog.

Check out the video after the break.