Tag Archives: power supply

Tiny transformer inside: Decapping an isolated power transfer chip

via Dangerous Prototypes

Ken Shirriff writes:

I saw an ad for a tiny chip1 that provides 5 volts2 of isolated power: You feed 5 volts in one side, and get 5 volts out the other side. What makes this remarkable is that the two sides can have up to 5000 volts between them. This chip contains a DC-DC converter and a tiny isolation transformer so there’s no direct electrical connection from one side to the other. I was amazed that they could fit all this into a package smaller than your fingernail, so I decided to take a look inside.

See the full details at righto.com.

12V 25A power supply

via Dangerous Prototypes

Stynus blogged about his 12V 25A power supply:

To test my LED Stair Lighting Controller boards I needed a 12V power supply that can deliver a lot of current. For this I chose a SP-320-12 from meanwell. However with the screw terminals it is not easy to use on a lab bench, also there is no display to monitor the output current. Therefore I build an enclosure around the PSU, and added a volt and ampere meter.

See the full post at en.elektronicastynus.be.

App note: Cable compensation of a primary-side-regulation power supply

via Dangerous Prototypes

Another tech note from Richtek on power supply regulation with cable compensation. Link here

Cable compensation has been used to compensate the voltage drop due to cable impedance for providing a regulated charging voltage in battery charger applications. This application note uses a novel cable compensation method, which called cable minus compensation, as an example to describe the concept and design criteria for the cable compensation of a PSR flyback converter. The analytic results are also verified by the simulation results.

App note: Monitoring additional supplies with the ADM1062–ADM1069 super sequencers

via Dangerous Prototypes

App note from Analog Devices about ways to extend capabilities of their ADM106x supply supervisor and sequencer chip. Link here (PDF)

The ADM1062–ADM1069 Super Sequencers accurately monitor a number of input rails. The ADM1062–ADM1067 have 10 input pins dedicated to monitoring (VH, VP1 to VP4, VX1 to VX5) and the ADM1068 and ADM1069 have eight (VH, VP1 to VP3, VX1 to VX4). Each of these pins has two internal programmable comparator circuits. By programming these circuits undervoltage only, overvoltage only or undervoltage and overvoltage trip points can be set up around each monitored supply. These trip points are 1% accurate at all allowable voltages and across the entire operational temperature range of the devices.

Building an extremely high powered 1-12V lab power supply on the cheap

via Dangerous Prototypes

Matthew Millman has published a new build:

For a number of years now I’ve had a couple of high powered switching power supply units made by Power-One. They’re typically found in I.T. equipment and provide a single output rail of either 12 V or 48 V with a very high current rating. The other cool thing is that in the case of the 12 V model – the output voltage can be changed in software from 1 V to 12 V (12.45 V is the max). The 48 V model does not allow configuration of the output voltage frustratingly.

See the full project writeup on Matt’s Tech Pages.

Building a Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) power supply using a DPS5005 module

via Dangerous Prototypes

Dr. Scott M. Baker has designed and built a PoE-powered lab power supply using a DPS5005 and custom PoE board:

The DPS5005 is a DC-DC converter. It can accept an input voltage from 0 to about 55 volts or so, and will regulate an output voltage up to about 1 volt below the input. This version is good to 5 amps, but there are other versions of this supply that will do as little as 30V / 2A and as much as 50V / 20A. 50V 5A seems like a good sweet spot. Since it is a DC-DC converter, you have to have a DC source to drive it. A lot of people use a 48V power brick, as they are commonly available.

Project info at smbaker.com.

Check out the video after the break.