Tag Archives: prototyping

Playing with a surplus E-ink module

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Sjaak @ smdprutser.nl writes:

When I was in China last year I sourced a couple of small E-ink displays (GDEH0124S01) through Taobao. They were simple ones with 8 14 segment characters. After some searching on the Chinese website from the manufacturer I found the datasheet. It was by all means not complete and a lot info was missing. After a bit more searching I found the controller used is DM130120 and its datasheet tells a bit more…
I made a PCB quite some time ago, but due to personal matters, I hadn’t the time to solder them up and write some code for it. A couple of days ago I soldered the PCB and fired up the compiler. After struggling through both of the chinglish manuals I converted their pseudo code into something the compiler and the micro understands.

More details at smdprutser.nl blog.

First GD32 tests

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Sjaak has published a new build, the STM32/GD32F103 QFN32 breakout board:

Uptill now I used 0603 sized resistors and capacitors but for this project I switched to 0402 to save a few mm on the board. I have soldered many challenging chip packages so I felt confident. The technique is the same as for bigger sized devices: flux the area generous, hold the device with tweezers, solder one pad with fresh soldered iron and move the device into the molten solder puddle, retract the soldering iron and watch the solder joint cool down. If the solder joint is solid solder the other side too. I suggest using a fine (curved) tweezer and lots of lighting on your workarea. If you are a bit older as I am using a loupe or magnifying glass. Still use flux as much as possible. Never expected but the micro USB connector gave me (several) headaches to get it soldered properly.

Project info at smdprutser.nl

 

Hackaday Prize Entry: You Know, For Kids

via hardware – Hackaday

Like the fictitious invention of the Hula Hoop in Hudsucker Proxy, [David Spinden]’s big idea is small and obvious once you’ve seen it. And we’re not saying that’s a bad thing at all. What he’s done is to make a new kind of prototyping connector; one that hooks into a through-plated hole like a pogo pin, but in the horizontal direction.

9092981463539177581This means that your test-points can do double duty as header connectors, when you need to make something more permanent, or vice-versa. That’s a lot of flexibility for a little wire, and it takes one more (mildly annoying) step out of prototyping — populating headers.

[David] makes them out of readily available header pins that already have the desired spring-like profile, and simply cuts them out and connects them to a standard Dupont-style hookup wire. Great stuff.

When we opened up the “Anything Goes” category for the Hackaday Prize, we meant it. We’re excited to see people entering large and small ideas that improve the world, even if it’s just the world of hackers.

The HackadayPrize2016 is Sponsored by:

Filed under: hardware, The Hackaday Prize

UCload: revisited

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Sjaak has posted an update on his uC controlled dummy load project we covered previously:

I finally found some time to check out the UCload project. A couple of weeks ago I quickly soldered the PCB and wrote a quick’n’dirty firmware for it. The basic functionality was working, but it wouldn’t do good for the shiny display.
Today I locked myself in my mancave and shut myself off from the world. Turned the light down, pulled loud music from the speakers and started coding like hell!! Not exactly but I found some time to write some more decent firmware for this load. In a previous revision of the PCB I forget the pull up resistors and swapped the SDA and SCL signals. I corrected that and made some small other changes (still ****ed up the silkscreen) in revision 2. The hardware is quite OK and rock solid (prolly more due to the robust FET then my analogue skills :)). However I managed to use a 1n4148 diode to measure the temperature. Connect it to the heat sink and if that one gets to hot turn on a fan. It accuracy is terrible but capable of detecting over temperature :)

More details at smdprutser.nl project page.

Discover what sound is made of with Sound Blocks

via Arduino Blog

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Sound Blocks is a tool to teach children and adults what sound is made of. The project was shortlisted in the Expression category of the IXDA Interaction Awards and it was developed by John Ferreira, Alejandra Molina, Andreas Refsgaard at the CIID using Arduino.

soundblocks

The device allows people to learn how, with a few parameters, it’s possible to create new sounds and, also, imitate real world sounds. Users can control waveform, sound decay or wave length and volume of three channels, all mixed together:

Sound blocks first and foremost was created as a tool to experiment with sound, it is playful and engaging.

Watch the video interview to discover more about the project and hear some noise:

Over the top UCload

via Dangerous Prototypes

ucload_rev2a

Sjaak has published a new build, uC controlled dummy load:

I’m mostly a digital guy, but I’m wanting to design my own power supply. If I’m wanting to test that i need a dummy load. I got inspired by the re:load (www.arachnidlabs.com/reload ). I added a microcontroller, rotary switch, external powersupply input and the obligatory 128×32 OLED :)

Project info at smdprutser.nl.

Via the project log forum.