Tag Archives: Raspberry Pi 3B+

Can’t Drive This, the 4D arcade machine

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A Raspberry Pi–powered arcade display with hidden interactive controls won over the crowds at Gamescom. Rosie Hattersley and Rob Zwetsloot got the inside scoop.

Pixel Maniacs is a Nuremberg-based games maker that started out making mobile apps. These days it specialises in games for PC, Xbox One, PlayStation, and Nintendo Switch. You Can’t Drive is its first foray into gaming with a Raspberry Pi.

If you’re going to add a little something extra to wow the crowd at the Gamescom video games trade fair, a Raspberry Pi is a surefire way of getting you noticed. And that’s the way Pixel Maniacs went about it.

The Nuremberg-based games developer retrofitted an arcade machine with a Raspberry Pi to showcase its intentionally silly Can’t Drive This precarious driving game at Gamescom.

This two-player co-operative game involves one player building the track while the other drives along it.

Complete with wrecking balls, explosions, an inconvenient number of walls, and the jeopardy of having to construct your road as you negotiate your way, at speed, across an ocean to the relative safety of the next lump of land, Can’t Drive This is a fast‑paced racing game.

Splash action

Pixel Maniacs then took things up a notch by providing interactive elements, building a mock 4D arcade game (so-named because they feature interactive elements such as motion cabinets). The fourth dimension, in this case, saw the inclusion of a water spray, fan, and console lights. For its Gamescom debut, Pixel Maniacs presented Can’t Drive This in a retro arcade cabinet, where hordes of gaming fans gathered round its four-way split screen to enjoy the action.

Getting to the heart of the matter and replacing the original 1980s kit with modern-day processors and Pi-powered additions

Adding Raspberry Pi gaming to the mix was about aiding the game development process as much as anything. Andy Holtz, Pixel Maniacs’ software engineer, told The MagPi that the team wanted an LED matrix with 256 RGB LEDs to render sprite-sheet animations. “We knew we needed a powerful machine with enough RAM, and a huge community, to get the scripts running.”

Pixel Maniacs’ offices have several Raspberry Pi–controlled monitors and a soundboard, so the team knew the Pi’s potential.

The schematic for the 4D arcade machine, showing the importance of the Raspberry Pi as a controller.

The arcade version of the game runs off a gaming laptop cunningly hidden within the walls of the cabinet, while the Raspberry Pi delivers the game’s surprise elements such as an unexpected blast from a water spray. A fan can be triggered to simulate stormy weather, and lights start flashing crazily when the cars crash. Holtz explains that the laptop “constantly sends information about the game’s state to the Raspberry Pi, via a USB UART controller. The Pi reads these state messages, converts them, and sends according commands to the fans, water nozzle, camera, and the LED light matrix. So when players drive through water, the PC sends the info to the Pi, and [the latter] turns on the nozzle, spraying them.”

Having played your heart out, you get a photo-booth-style shot of you in full-on gaming action.

The arcade idea came about when Pixel Maniacs visited the offices of German gaming magazine M! Games and spied an abandoned, out-of-order 1980s arcade machine lurking unloved in a corner. Pixel Maniacs set about rejuvenating it, Da Doo Ron Ron soundtrack and all.

Sustained action

Ideas are one thing; standing up to the rigours of a full weekend’s uninterrupted gameplay at the world’s biggest games meet is something else. Holtz tells us, “The Raspberry Pi performed like a beast throughout the entire time. Gamescom was open from 9am till 8pm, so it had to run for eleven hours straight, without overheating or crashing. Fortunately, it did. None of the peripherals connected to the Pi had any problems, and we did not have a single crash.”

A Raspberry Pi 3B+ was used to trigger the water spray, lights, and fans, bringing an extra element to the gameplay, as well as rendering the arcade machine’s graphics.

Fans were enthusiastic too, with uniformly positive feedback, and one Gamescom attendee attempting to buy the arcade version there and then. As Andy Holtz says, though, you don’t sell your baby. Instead, Pixel Maniacs is demoing it at games conventions in Germany this autumn, before launching Can’t Drive This across gaming platforms at the end of the year.

This article was printed in The MagPi issue 75. Get your copy of The MagPi in stores now, or download it as a free PDF here.

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Build your own robotic cat: Petoi returns

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Who wouldn’t want a robot kitten? Exactly — we knew you’d understand! And so does the Petoi team, hence their new crowdfunding campaign for Petoi Nybble.

Petoi Nybble

Main campaign video. Back our Indiegogo campaign to adopt Nybble the robo kitten! Share with your friends who may love it! Indiegogo: https://igg.me/at/nybble A more technical post: https://www.hackster.io/RzLi/petoi-nybble-944867 Don’t forget to follow Twitter @PetoiCamp and subscribe to Petoi.com for our newsletters! Most importantly, enjoy our new kitten!

Petoi mark 2

Earlier this year, we shared the robotic cat project Petoi by Rongzhong Li. You all loved it as much as we did, and eagerly requested more information on making one.

Petoi Raspberry Pi Robot Cat

Rongzhong’s goal always was for Petoi to be open-source, so that it can be a teaching aid as much as it is a pet. And with his team’s crowdfunding campaign, he has made building your own robot cat even easier.

Petoi the laser-cut robotic cat

Laser kitty

In the new Nybble version of Petoi, the team replaced 3D-printed parts with laser-cut wood, and cut down the parts list to be more manageable: a Raspberry Pi 3B+, a Sparkfun Arduino Pro Mini, and the Nybble kit, available in the Nybble IndieGoGo campaign.

Petoi the laser-cut robotic cat

The Nybble kit! “The wooden frame is a retro design in honor of its popstick-framed ancestor. I also borrowed the wisdom from traditional Chinese woodwork (in honor of my ancestors), to make the major frame screw-free.”

But Nybble is more than just wooden parts and servo motors! The robotic cat’s artificial intelligence lets users teach it as well as control it,  so every kitty will be unique.

Nybble’s motion is driven by an Arduino-compatible micro-controller. It stores instinctive “muscle memory” to move around. An optional AI chip, such as a Raspberry Pi, can be mounted on top of Nybble’s back, to help Nybble with perception and decision. You can program in your favorite language, and direct Nybble to walk around simply by sending short commands, such as “walk” or “turn left”!

The NyBoard

For this version, the Petoi team has created he NyBoard, an all-in-one controller board for the Raspberry Pi. It’s available to back for $45 if you don’t want to pledge $200 for the entire cat kit.

Petoi the laser-cut robotic cat

Learn more

If you’d like to learn more about Nybble, visit its IndieGoGo campaign page, find more technical details on its Hackster.io project page, or check out the OpenCat GitHub repo.

Petoi the laser-cut robotic cat

And if you’ve built your own robotic pet, such as a K-9–inspired dog, or Raspberry Pi–connected android sheep, let us know!

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You wouldn’t download a car…

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You wouldn’t download a car…but is that just because none of us know how to? And OF COURSE none of us know how to: it’s a really hard thing to do!

Raspberry Pi Tesla

Dramatic reenactment using a Mini because, c’mon, as if I can afford a Tesla!

Nikola Tesla was in love with a pigeon 😍🐦

True story. He was also the true father of the electrical age (sorry, not sorry, Edison) and looked so much like David Bowie that here’s David Bowie playing Nikola Tesla:

David Bowie as Nicola Tesla — Raspberry Pi Tesla

Not even pigeon love

Which is the perfect segue, as here’s a Tesla playing David Bowie, and here’s also where our story truly begins…

Some people dislike Tesla (the car manufacturer, not the pigeon enthusiast Bowie lookalike scientist)

But some people also dislike going to the dentist, so ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

I’m pretty sure the reason some people have issues with Tesla is that electric cars still seem like a form of magic we’re not quite comfortable with. (Go, fossil fuels, amirite?)

And it may also be because spending a house deposit on a car seems a little absurd. (Oh, did anyone see the new iPhone XS Max? Take my money, amirite?)

Whatever people’s reason for holding a grudge against Tesla, recent findings at a university in Belgium this week have left the tech community aflutter: the academics announced that, with the aid of a “$35 computer”, they can clone your Tesla car key and steal. Your. Car.

If you haven’t guessed yet, we’re the ones behind the $35 computer. (Hi!)

Says WIRED: A team of researchers at the KU Leuven University in Belgium on Monday plan to present a paper at the Cryptographic Hardware and Embedded Systems conference in Amsterdam, revealing a technique for defeating the encryption used in the wireless key fobs of Tesla’s Model S luxury sedans. With about $600 in radio and computing equipment, they can wirelessly read signals from a nearby Tesla owner’s fob. Less than two seconds of computation yields the fob’s cryptographic key, allowing them to steal the associated car without a trace.

When I said that the tech community was all aflutter, what I meant was, on the whole, we find this hack somewhat entertaining but aren’t all that shocked by it. Not because we hate Tesla, but because these things happen. Technology is ever evolving, and that $600 worth of kit can do a thing to another thing isn’t all that unbelievable.

Sweet Cyber Jones on Twitter

The keys to my new Tesla https://t.co/jNViEZBxrB

The academics showed an example of the hack using “just” a couple of radios, a Raspberry Pi, some batteries, and your basic, off-the-shelf “pre-computed table of keys on a portable hard drive”. And through the magic of electric car IoT technology, Tesla instantly released a series of fixes to allow existing Tesla users to protect their cars against the attack, which is all kinds of cool.

Alex, why are you making such light of this?!

Because The Fast and the Furious isn’t real. And I highly doubt there’s a criminal enterprise out there that’s capable of building the same technology as well-funded university researchers.

Yes, this study from KU Leuven University is interesting. And yes, we all had a good laugh at the expense of Tesla and Elon Musk, but we don’t need academics to provide material for that. And I genuinely love Tesla and the work Elon is doing. True love.

Instead, we should be seeing this as a reminder that data encryption and online security are things we all need to take seriously in this digital world. So stop connecting your phone to whatever free WiFi network you can find, stop using PASSWORD123 for all your online accounts, and spend a little more time learning how you can better protect yourself and your family from nasty people on the internet.

And leave Britney Tesla alone!

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Cabin Cloud: bump-free travel on the night bus

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Planes, trains, and automobiles — we all have our preference. And at one company in California, the team is trying to smooth bus travel to broaden commuters’ options for a blissful night’s sleep.

Cabin bus Raspberry Pi Wired

Leaving on a jet plane

Not everyone wants to fly. While many enjoy the feel of take-off and landing and the high speed at which they can travel from A to B, others see planes as worrisome tin cans of doom, suspended in the air by unreliable magic. I consider myself mostly the former, with a hint of the latter for balance.

In truth, I’d rather catch a train, where the smooth ride sends me into blissful sleep, only occasionally interrupted by a snap of “Damn, did I miss my stop?!”.

But trains are limited to where their tracks lead, which is why so many people still opt to travel by bus. But who can sleep on a bus when the roads are dotted with potholes and cracks? I can’t, and neither can many of the 10000 passengers of the Cabin bus, an overnight service running between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Cabin bus travel

To address complaints about the road conditions affecting costumers’ sleep, the Cabin team decided to challenge gravity using a Raspberry Pi and the electric motor from a hoverboard in their new venture Cabin Cloud.

Introducing the first active suspension system designed specifically with passenger sleep in mind. Combining patent-pending software and hardware, our technology mutes ‘road turbulence’ and dramatically reduces vibration, so you can get a good night’s sleep while on a moving vehicle.

“We can isolate a passenger’s body, and input frequencies that help people relax and fall asleep,” explains Cabin CTO Tom Currier. “We have a set of sensors that are measuring the acceleration of the vehicle, and also the bed, to compute in real time what we should be cancelling out.”

Cabin bus Raspberry Pi Wired

The sensors are accelerometers, two per bed, that measure the bumps from the road and adjust the bed accordingly — up to 1000 times a second. The Cabin Cloud beds only adjust for motion up and down: the team isn’t too concerned about back-and-forth movements due to breaking too hard or turning corners, since Cabin busses predominantly travel on wide, open highways.

Delve a little deeper

Check out this article from Wired for more about the project, and about how similar tech is implemented in trucks for long-haul drivers, and in aeroplanes for turbulence-free travel. You can also sign up for the Cabin Cloud newsletter here.

But the big question about Cabin Cloud is…

Does it have Bluetooth?

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Build a social media follower counter

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In this tutorial from HackSpace magazine issue 9, Paul Freeman-Powell shows you how to keep track of your social media followers, and encourage subscribers, by building a live follower counter. Get your copy of HackSpace magazine in stores now, or download it as a free PDF here.

Issues 10 of HackSpace magazine is available online and in stores from tomorrow!

The finished build with all components connected, working, and installed in the frame ready for hanging on the wall

If you run a local business like an electronics shop or a café, or if you just want to grow your online following and influence, this project is a fun way to help you keep track of your progress. A counter could also help contribute to growing your following if you hang it on the wall and actively ask your customers to like/follow you to see the numbers go up!

You’ve probably seen those social media follower counters that feature mechanical splitflap displays. In this project we’ll build a counter powered by RGB LEDs that scrolls through four social profiles, using APIs to pull the number of followers for each account. I’m using YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram; you can, of course, tailor the project to your needs.

This project involves a bit of electronics, a bit of software coding, and a bit of woodwork, as well as some fairly advanced display work as we transfer a small portion of the Raspberry Pi’s HDMI output onto the LED matrices.

Let’s get social

First, you need to get your Raspberry Pi all set up and talking to the social networks that you’re going to display. Usually, it’s advisable to install Raspbian without any graphical user interface (GUI) for most electronics projects, but in this case you’ll be actively using that GUI, so make sure you start with a fresh and up-to-date installation of full-fat Raspbian.

phpMyAdmin gives you an easy web interface to allow you to access and edit the device’s settings – for example, speed and direction of scrolling, API credentials, and the social network accounts to monitor

You start by turning your humble little Raspberry Pi into your very own mini web server, which will gather your credentials, talk to the social networks, and display the follower counts. To do this, you need to install a LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) stack. Start by installing the Apache web server by opening a Terminal and typing:

sudo apt-get install apache2 -y

Then, open the web browser on your Pi and type http://localhost — you will see a default page telling you that Apache is working. The page on our little ‘website’ will use code written in the PHP language, so install that by returning to your Terminal and typing:

sudo apt-get install php -y

Once that’s complete, restart Apache:

sudo service apache2 restart

Next, you’ll install the database to store your credentials, settings, and the handles of the social accounts to track. This is done with the following command in your Terminal:

sudo apt-get install mysql-server php-mysql -y

To set a root password for your database, type the following command and follow the on-screen instructions:

sudo mysql_secure_installation

Restart Apache again. Then, for easier management of the database, I recommend installing phpMyAdmin:

sudo apt-get install phpMyAdmin -y

At this point, it’s a good idea to connect your Pi to a WiFi network, unless you’re going to be running a network cable to it. Either way, it’s useful to have SSH enabled and to know its IP address so we can access it remotely. Type the following to access Pi settings and enable SSH:

sudo raspi-config

To determine your Pi’s IP address (which will likely be something like 192.168.0.xxx), type either of the following two commands:

ifconfig # this gives you lots of extra info
hostname -I # this gives you less info, but all we need in this case

Now that SSH is enabled and you know the LAN IP address of the Pi, you can use PuTTY to connect to it from another computer for the rest of your work. The keyboard, mouse, and monitor can now be unplugged from the Raspberry Pi.

Social media monitor

To set up the database, type http://XXX/ phpmyadmin (where XXX is your Pi’s IP address) and log in as root with the password you set previously. Head to the User Accounts section and create a new user called socialCounter.

You can now download the first bit of code for this project by running this in your Terminal window:

cd /var/www/html

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get install git -y

sudo git clone https://github.com/paulfp/social- media-counter.git

Next, open up the db.php script and edit it to include the password you set when creating the socialCounter user:

cd ./social-media-counter

sudo nano db.php

The database, including tables and settings, is contained in the socialCounter.sql file; this can be imported either via the Terminal or via phpMyAdmin, then open up the credentials table. To retrieve the subscriber count, YouTube requires a Google API key, so go to console.cloud.google.com and create a new Project (call it anything you like). From the left-hand menu, select ‘APIs & Services’, followed by ‘Library’ and search for the YouTube Data API and enable it. Then go to the ‘Credentials’ tab and create an API key that you can then paste into the ‘googleApiKey’ database field.

Facebook requires you to create an app at developers.facebook.com, after which you can paste the details into the facebookAppId and facebookSecret fields. Unfortunately, due to recent scandals surrounding clandestine misuse of personal data on Facebook, you’ll need to submit your app for review and approval before it will work.

The ‘social_accounts’ table is where you enter the user names for the social networks you want to monitor, so replace those with your own and then open a new tab and navigate to http://XXX/socialmedia-counter. You should now see a black page with a tiny carousel showing the social media icons plus follower counts next to each one. The reason it’s so small is because it’s a 64×16 pixel portion of the screen that we’ll be displaying on our 64×16 LED boards.

GPIO pins to LED display

Now that you have your social network follower counts being grabbed and displayed, it’s time to get that to display on our screens. The first step is to wire them up with the DuPont jumper cables from the Raspberry Pi’s GPIO pins to the connection on the first board. This is quite fiddly, but there’s an excellent guide and diagram on GitHub within Henner Zeller’s library that we’ll be using later, so head to hsmag.cc/PLyRcK and refer to wiring.md.

The Raspberry Pi connects to the RGB LED screens with 14 jumper cables, and the screens are daisy-chained together with a ribbon cable

The second screen is daisy-chained to the first one with the ribbon cable, and the power connector that comes with the screens will plug into both panels. Once you’re done, your setup should look just like the picture on this page.

To display the Pi’s HDMI output on the LED screens, install Adafruit’s rpi-fb-matrix library (which in turn uses Henner Zeller’s library to address the panels) by typing the following commands:

sudo apt-get install -y build-essential libconfig++-dev

cd ~

git clone --recursive https://github.com/ adafruit/rpi-fb-matrix.git

cd rpi-fb-matrix

Next, you must define your wiring as regular. Type the following to edit the Makefile:

nano Makefile

Look for the HARDWARE_DESC= property and ensure the line looks like this: export HARDWARE_DESC=regular before saving and exiting nano. You’re now ready to compile the code, so type this and then sit back and watch the output:

make clean all

Once that’s done, there are a few more settings to change in the matrix configuration file, so open that up:

nano matrix.cfg

You need to make several changes in here, depending on your setup:

  • Change display_width to 64 and display_height to 16
  • Set panel_width to 32 and panel_height to 16
  • Set chain_length to 2
  • Set parallel_count to 1

The panel array should look like this:

panels = ( 
  ( { order = 1; rotate = 0; }, { order = 0; rotate = 0; } )
)

Uncomment the crop_origin = (0, 0) line to tell the tool that we don’t want to squish the entire display onto our screens, just an equivalent portion starting right in the top left of the display. Press CTRL+X, then Y, then ENTER to save and exit.

It ain’t pretty…but it’s out of sight. The Raspberry Pi plus the power supply for the screens fit nice and neatly behind the screens. I left each end open to allow airflow

Finally, before you can test the output, there are some other important settings you need to change first, so open up the Raspberry Pi’s boot configuration as follows:

sudo nano /boot/config.txt

First, disable the on-board sound (as it uses hardware that the screens rely on) by looking for the line that says dtparam=audio=on and changing it to off. Also, uncomment the line that says hdmi_force_hotplug=1, to ensure that an HDMI signal is still generated even with no HDMI monitor plugged in. Save and then reboot your Raspberry Pi.

Now run the program using the config you just set:

cd ~/rpi-fb-matrix

sudo ./rpi-fb-matrix matrix.cfg

You should now see the top 64×16 pixels of your Pi’s display represented on your RGB LED panels! This probably consists of the Raspberry Pi icon and the rest of the top portion of the display bar.

No screensaver!

At this point it’s important to ensure that there’s no screensaver or screen blanking enabled on the Pi, as you want this to display all the time. To disable screen blanking, first install the xscreensaver tool:

sudo apt-get install xscreensaver

That will add a screensaver option to the Pi’s GUI menus, allowing you to disable it completely. Finally, you need to tell the Raspberry Pi to do two things each time it loads:

  • Run the rpi-fb-matrix program (like we did manually just now)
  • Open the web browser in fullscreen (‘kiosk’ mode), pointed to the Social Counter web page

To do so, edit the Pi’s autostart configuration file:

sudo nano ~/.config/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart

Insert the following two lines at the end:

@sudo /home/pi/rpi-fb-matrix/rpi-fb-matrix /home/ pi/rpi-fb-matrix/matrix.cfg\

@chromium-browser --kiosk http://localhost/ social-media-counter

Et voilà!

Disconnect any keyboard, monitor, or mouse from the Pi and reboot it one more time. Once it’s started up again, you should have a fully working display cycling through each enabled social network, showing up-to-date follower counts for each.

It’s now time to make a surround to hold all the components together and allow you to wall-mount your display. The styling you go for is up to you — you could even go all out and design and 3D print a custom package.

The finished product, in pride of place on the wall of our office. Now I just need some more subscribers…!

For my surround, I went for the more rustic and homemade look, and used some spare bits of wood from an internal door frame lining. This worked really well due to the pre-cut recess. With a plywood back, you can screw everything together so that the wood holds the screens tightly enough to not require any extra fitting or gluing, making for easier future maintenance. To improve the look and readability of the display (as well as soften the light and reduce the brightness), you can use a reflective diffuser from an old broken LED TV if you can lay your hands on one from eBay or a TV repair shop, or just any other bit of translucent material. I found that two layers stapled on worked and looked great. Add some hooks to the back and — Bob’s your uncle — a finished, wall-mounted display!

Phew — that was quite an advanced build, but you now have a sophisticated display that can be used for any number of things and should delight your customers whilst helping to build your social following as well. Don’t forget to tweet us a picture of yours!

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Getting started with your Raspberry Pi

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Here on the Raspberry Pi blog, we often share impressive builds made by community members who have advanced making and coding skills. But what about those of you who are just getting started?

Getting started with Raspberry Pi

For you, we’ve been working hard to update and polish our Getting started resources, including a brand-new video to help you get to grips with your new Pi.

Getting started with Raspberry Pi

Whether you’re new to electronics and the Raspberry Pi, or a seasoned pro looking to share your knowledge and skills with others, sit back and watch us walk you through the basics of setting up our powerful little computer.

How to set up your Raspberry Pi || Getting started with #RaspberryPi

Learn how to set up your Raspberry Pi for the first time, from plugging in peripherals to loading Raspbian.

We’ve tried to make this video as easy to follow as possible, with only the essential explanations and steps.

getting started with raspberry pi

As with everything we produce, we want this video to be accessible to the entire world, so if you can translate its text into another language, please follow this link to submit your translation directly through YouTube. You can also add translations to our other YouTube videos here! As a thank you, we’ll display your username in the video descriptions to acknowledge your contributions.

New setup guides and resources

Alongside our shiny new homepage, we’ve also updated our Help section to reflect our newest tech and demonstrate the easiest way for beginners to start their Raspberry Pi journey. We’re now providing a first-time setup guide, and also a walk-through for using your Raspberry Pi that shows you all sort of things you can do with it. And with guides to our official add-on devices and a troubleshooting section, our updated Help page is your one-stop shop for getting the most out of your Pi.

getting started with raspberry pi

For parents and teachers, we offer guides on introducing Raspberry Pi and digital making to your children and students. And for those of you who are visual learners, we’ve curated a collection of our videos to help you get making.

As with our videos, we’re looking for people whose first language isn’t English to help us translate our resources. If you’re able to donate some of your time to support this cause, please sign up here.

The forums

We’re very proud of our forum community. Since the birth of the Raspberry Pi, our forums have been the place to go for additional support, conversation, and project bragging.

Raspberry Pi forums

If your question isn’t answered on our Help page, there’s no better place to go than the forums. Nine times out of ten, your question will already have been asked and answered there! And if not, then our friendly forum community will be happy to share their wealth of knowledge and help you out.

Events and clubs

Raspberry Pi and digital making enthusiasts come together across the world at various events and clubs, including Raspberry Jams, Code Club and CoderDojo, and Coolest Projects. These events are perfect for learning more about how people use Raspberry Pi and other technologies for digital making — as a hobby and as a tool for education.

getting started with raspberry pi

Keep up to date

To keep track of all the goings-on of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, be sure to follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, and sign up to our Raspberry Pi Weekly newsletter and the monthly Raspberry Pi LEARN education newsletter.

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