Tag Archives: retro games

Recreate Time Pilot’s free-scrolling action | Wireframe #41

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Fly through the clouds in our re-creation of Konami’s classic 1980s shooter. Mark Vanstone has the code

Arguably one of Konami’s most successful titles, Time Pilot burst into arcades in 1982. Yoshiki Okamoto worked on it secretly, and it proved so successful that a sequel soon followed. In the original, the player flew through five eras, from 1910, 1940, 1970, 1982, and then to the far future: 2001. Aircraft start as biplanes and progress to become UFOs, naturally, by the last level.

Players also rescue other pilots by picking them up as they parachute from their aircraft. The player’s plane stays in the centre of the screen while other game objects move around it. The clouds that give the impression of movement have a parallax style to them, some moving faster than others, offering an illusion of depth.

To make our own version with Pygame Zero, we need eight frames of player aircraft images – one for each direction it can fly. After we create a player Actor object, we can get input from the cursor keys and change the direction the aircraft is pointing with a variable which will be set from zero to 7, zero being the up direction. Before we draw the player to the screen, we set the image of the Actor to the stem image name, plus whatever that direction variable is at the time. That will give us a rotating aircraft.

To provide a sense of movement, we add clouds. We can make a set of random clouds on the screen and move them in the opposite direction to the player aircraft. As we only have eight directions, we can use a lookup table to change the x and y coordinates rather than calculating movement values. When they go off the screen, we can make them reappear on the other side so that we end up with an ‘infinite’ playing area. Add a level variable to the clouds, and we can move them at different speeds on each update() call, producing the parallax effect. Then we need enemies. They will need the same eight frames to move in all directions. For this sample, we will just make one biplane, but more could be made and added.

Our Python homage to Konami’s arcade classic.

To get the enemy plane to fly towards the player, we need a little maths. We use the math.atan2() function to work out the angle between the enemy and the player. We convert that to a direction which we set in the enemy Actor object, and set its image and movement according to that direction variable. We should now have the enemy swooping around the player, but we will also need some bullets. When we create bullets, we need to put them in a list so that we can update each one individually in our update(). When the player hits the fire button, we just need to make a new bullet Actor and append it to the bullets list. We give it a direction (the same as the player Actor) and send it on its way, updating its position in the same way as we have done with the other game objects.

The last thing is to detect bullet hits. We do a quick point collision check and if there’s a match, we create an explosion Actor and respawn the enemy somewhere else. For this sample, we haven’t got any housekeeping code to remove old bullet Actors, which ought to be done if you don’t want the list to get really long, but that’s about all you need: you have yourself a Time Pilot clone!

Here’s Mark’s code for a Time Pilot-style free-scrolling shooter. To get it running on your system, you’ll need to install Pygame Zero. And to download the full code and assets, head here.

Get your copy of Wireframe issue 41

You can read more features like this one in Wireframe issue 41, available directly from Raspberry Pi Press — we deliver worldwide.

And if you’d like a handy digital version of the magazine, you can also download issue 41 for free in PDF format.

Make sure to follow Wireframe on Twitter and Facebook for updates and exclusive offers and giveaways. Subscribe on the Wireframe website to save up to 49% compared to newsstand pricing!

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Code retro games with Digital Making at Home

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Join us for Digital Making at Home: this week, young people can recreate classic* video games with us! Through Digital Making at Home, we invite kids all over the world to code along with us and our new videos every week.

So get ready to code some classic retro games with us:

Check out this week’s code-along projects!

And tune in on Wednesday 2pm BST / 9am EDT / 7.30pm IST at rpf.io/home to code along with our live stream session!

* Be warned that we’re using the terms ‘classic/retro’ in line with the age of our young digital makers — a LOT of games are retro for them 😄

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Code Jetpac’s rocket building action | Wireframe #40

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Pick up parts of a spaceship, fuel it up, and take off in Mark Vanstone’s Python and Pygame Zero rendition of a ZX Spectrum classic

The original Jetpac, in all its 8-bit ZX Spectrum glory

For ZX Spectrum owners, there was something special about waiting for a game to load, with the sound of zeros and ones screeching from the cassette tape player next to the computer. When the loading screen – an image of an astronaut and Ultimate Play the Game’s logo – appeared, you knew the wait was going to be worthwhile. Created by brothers Chris and Tim Stamper in 1983, Jetpac was one of the first hits for their studio, Ultimate Play the Game. The game features the hapless astronaut Jetman, who must build and fuel a rocket from the parts dotted around the screen, all the while avoiding or shooting swarms of deadly aliens.

This month’s code snippet will provide the mechanics of collecting the ship parts and fuel to get Jetman’s spaceship to take off.  We can use the in-built Pygame Zero Actor objects for all the screen elements and the Actor collision routines to deal with gravity and picking up items. To start, we need to initialise our Actors. We’ll need our Jetman, the ground, some platforms, the three parts of the rocket, some fire for the rocket engines, and a fuel container. The way each Actor behaves will be determined by a set of lists. We have a list for objects with gravity, objects that are drawn each frame, a list of platforms, a list of collision objects, and the list of items that can be picked up.

Jetman jumps inside the rocket and is away. Hurrah!

Our draw() function is straightforward as it loops through the list of items in the draw list and then has a couple of conditional elements being drawn after. The update() function is where all the action happens: we check for keyboard input to move Jetman around, apply gravity to all the items on the gravity list, check for collisions with the platform list, pick up the next item if Jetman is touching it, apply any thrust to Jetman, and move any items that Jetman is holding to move with him. When that’s all done, we can check if refuelling levels have reached the point where Jetman can enter the rocket and blast off.

If you look at the helper functions checkCollisions() and checkTouching(), you’ll see that they use different methods of collision detection, the first being checking for a collision with a specified point so we can detect collisions with the top or bottom of an actor, and the touching collision is a rectangle or bounding box collision, so that if the bounding box of two Actors intersect, a collision is registered. The other helper function applyGravity() makes everything on the gravity list fall downward until the base of the Actor hits something on the collide list.

So that’s about it: assemble a rocket, fill it with fuel, and lift off. The only thing that needs adding is a load of pesky aliens and a way to zap them with a laser gun.

Here’s Mark’s Jetpac code. To get it running on your system, you’ll need to install Pygame Zero. And to download the full code and assets, head here.

Get your copy of Wireframe issue 40

You can read more features like this one in Wireframe issue 40, available directly from Raspberry Pi Press — we deliver worldwide.

And if you’d like a handy digital version of the magazine, you can also download issue 40 for free in PDF format.

Make sure to follow Wireframe on Twitter and Facebook for updates and exclusive offers and giveaways. Subscribe on the Wireframe website to save up to 49% compared to newsstand pricing!

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(Raspberry) Pi Commander | The MagPi 95

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Adrien Castel’s idea of converting an old electronic toy into a retro games machine was no flight of fancy, as David Crookes discovers

The 1980s was a golden era for imaginative electronic toys. Children would pester their parents for a Tomytronic 3D or a Nintendo Game & Watch. And they would enviously eye anyone who had a Tomy Turnin’ Turbo Dashboard with its promise of replicating the thrill of driving (albeit without the traffic jams).

All of the buttons, other than the joystick, are original to the toy – as are the seven red LED lights

Two years ago, maker Matt Brailsford turned that amazing toy into a fully working Out Run arcade machine and Adrien Castel was smitten. “I loved the fact that he’d upcycled an old toy and created something that could be enjoyed as a grown-up,” he says. “But I wanted to push the simulation a bit further and I thought a flying sim could do the trick.”

“I didn’t want to modify the look of the toy”

Ideas began flying around Adrien’s mind. “I knew what I wanted to achieve so I made an overall plan in my head,” he recalls. First he found the perfect toy: a battery-powered Sky Fighter F-16 tabletop game made by Dival. He then decided to base his build around a Raspberry Pi 3A+. “It’s the perfect hardware for projects like this because of its flexibility,” Adrien says.

Taking off

The toy needed some work. Its original bright red joystick was missing and Adrien knew he’d have to replace the original screen with a TFT LCD. To do this, he 3D-printed a frame to fit the TFT display and he created a smaller base for the replacement joystick. Adrien also changed the microswitches for greater sensitivity but he didn’t go overboard with the changes.

The games can make use of the full screen. Adrien would have liked a larger screen, but the original ratio oddly lay between 4:3 and 16:9, making a bigger display harder to find

“I knew I would have to adapt some parts for the joystick and for the screen, but I didn’t want to modify the look of the toy,” Adrien explains. “To be honest, modifying the toy would have involved some sanding and painting and I was worried that it would ruin the overall effect of the project if it was badly executed.”

A Raspberry Pi 3A+ sits at the heart of the Pi Commander, alongside a mini audio amplifier, and it’s wired up to components within the toy

As such, a challenge was set. “I had to keep most of the original parts such as throttle levers and LEDs and adapt them to the new build,” he says. “This meant getting them to work together with the system and it also meant using the original PCB, getting rid of the components and re-routing the electronics to plug on the GPIOs.”

There were some enhancements. Adrien soldered a PAM8403 3W class-D audio amplifier to Raspberry Pi and this allowed a basic speaker to replace the original for better sound. But there were some compromises too.

The original PCB was used and the electronics were re-routed. All the components need to work between 3.3 to 5V with the lowest possible amperage while fitting into a tight space

“At first I thought the screen could be bigger than the one I used, but the round shape of the cockpit didn’t give much space to fit a screen larger than four inches.” He also believes the project could be improved with a better joystick: “The one I’ve used is a simple two-button arcade stick with a jet fighter look.”

Flying high

By using the retro gaming OS Recalbox (based on EmulationStation and RetroArch), however, he’s been able to perfect the overall feel. “Recalbox allowed me to create a custom front end that matches the look of a jet fighter,” he explains. It also means the Pi Commander plays shoot-’em-up games alongside open-source simulators like FlightGear (flightgear.org). “It’s a lot of fun.”

Read The MagPi for free!

Find more fantastic projects, tutorials, and reviews in The MagPi #93, out now! You can get The MagPi #95 online at our store, or in print from all good newsagents and supermarkets. You can also access The MagPi magazine via our Android and iOS apps.

Don’t forget our super subscription offers, which include a free gift of a Raspberry Pi Zero W when you subscribe for twelve months.

And, as with all our Raspberry Pi Press publications, you can download the free PDF from our website.

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Code Robotron: 2084’s twin-stick action | Wireframe #38

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News flash! Before we get into our Robotron: 2084 code, we have some important news to share about Wireframe: as of issue 39, the magazine will be going monthly.

The new 116-page issue will be packed with more in-depth features, more previews and reviews, and more of the guides to game development that make the magazine what it is. The change means we’ll be able to bring you new subscription offers, and generally make the magazine more sustainable in a challenging global climate.

As for existing subscribers, we’ll be emailing you all to let you know how your subscription is changing, and we’ll have some special free issues on offer as a thank you for your support.

The first monthly issue will be out on 4 June, and subsequent editions will be published on the first Thursday of every month after that. You’ll be able to order a copy online, or you’ll find it in selected supermarkets and newsagents if you’re out shopping for essentials.

We now return you to our usual programming…

Move in one direction and fire in another with this Python and Pygame re-creation of an arcade classic. Raspberry Pi’s own Mac Bowley has the code.

Robotron: 2084 is often listed on ‘best game of all time’ lists, and has been remade and re-released for numerous systems over the years.

Robotron: 2084

Released back in 1982, Robotron: 2084 popularised the concept of the twin-stick shooter. It gave players two joysticks which allowed them to move in one direction while also shooting at enemies in another. Here, I’ll show you how to recreate those controls using Python and Pygame. We don’t have access to any sticks, only a keyboard, so we’ll be using the arrow keys for movement and WASD to control the direction of fire.

The movement controls use a global variable, a few if statements, and two built-in Pygame functions: on_key_down and on_key_up. The on_key_down function is called when a key on the keyboard is pressed, so when the player presses the right arrow key, for example, I set the x direction of the player to be a positive 1. Instead of setting the movement to 1, instead, I’ll add 1 to the direction. The on_key_down function is called when a button’s released. A key being released means the player doesn’t want to travel in that direction anymore and so we should do the opposite of what we did earlier – we take away the 1 or -1 we applied in the on_key_up function.

We repeat this process for each arrow key. Moving the player in the update() function is the last part of my movement; I apply a move speed and then use a playArea rect to clamp the player’s position.

The arena background and tank sprites were created in Piskel. Separate sprites for the tank allow the turret to rotate separately from the tracks.

Turn and fire

Now for the aiming and rotating. When my player aims, I want them to set the direction the bullets will fire, which functions like the movement. The difference this time is that when a player hits an aiming key, I set the direction directly rather than adjusting the values. If my player aims up, and then releases that key, the shooting will stop. Our next challenge is changing this direction into a rotation for the turret.

Actors in Pygame can be rotated in degrees, so I have to find a way of turning a pair of x and y directions into a rotation. To do this, I use the math module’s atan2 function to find the arc tangent of two points. The function returns a result in radians, so it needs to be converted. (You’ll also notice I had to adjust mine by 90 degrees. If you want to avoid having to do this, create a sprite that faces right by default.)

To fire bullets, I’m using a flag called ‘shooting’ which, when set to True, causes my turret to turn and fire. My bullets are dictionaries; I could have used a class, but the only thing I need to keep track of is an actor and the bullet’s direction.

Here’s Mac’s code snippet, which creates a simple twin-stick shooting mechanic in Python. To get it working on your system, you’ll need to install Pygame Zero. And to download the full code and assets, go here.

You can look at the update function and see how I’ve implemented a fire rate for the turret as well. You can edit the update function to take a single parameter, dt, which stores the time since the last frame. By adding these up, you can trigger a bullet at precise intervals and then reset the timer.

This code is just a start – you could add enemies and maybe other player weapons to make a complete shooting experience.

Get your copy of Wireframe issue 38

You can read more features like this one in Wireframe issue 38, available directly from Raspberry Pi Press — we deliver worldwide.

And if you’d like a handy digital version of the magazine, you can also download issue 38 for free in PDF format.

Make sure to follow Wireframe on Twitter and Facebook for updates and exclusive offers and giveaways. Subscribe on the Wireframe website to save up to 49% compared to newsstand pricing!

The post Code Robotron: 2084’s twin-stick action | Wireframe #38 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Make a Side Pocket-esque pool game | Wireframe #36

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Recreate the arcade pool action of Data East’s Side Pocket. Raspberry Pi’s own Mac Bowley has the code.

In the original Side Pocket, the dotted line helped the player line up shots, while additional functions on the UI showed where and how hard you were striking the cue ball.

Created by Data East in 1986, Side Pocket was an arcade pool game that challenged players to sink all the balls on the table and achieve a minimum score to progress. As the levels went on, players faced more balls in increasingly difficult locations on the table.

Here, I’ll focus on three key aspects from Side Pocket: aiming a shot, moving the balls, and handling collisions for balls and pockets. This project is great for anyone who wants to dip their toe into 2D game physics. I’m going to use the Pygame’s built-in collision system as much as possible, to keep the code readable and short wherever I can.

Making a pool game

Before thinking about aiming and moving balls, I need a table to play on. I created both a border and a play area sprite using piskelapp.com; originally, this was one sprite, and I used a rect to represent the play area (see Figure 1). Changing to two sprites and making the play area an actor made all the collisions easier to handle and made everything much easier to place.

Figure 1: Our table with separate border. You could add some detail to your own table, or even adapt a photograph to make it look even more realistic.

For the balls, I made simple 32×32 sprites in varying colours. I need to be able to keep track of some information about each ball on the table, such as its position, a sprite, movement, and whether it’s been pocketed or not – once a ball’s pocketed, it’s removed from play. Each ball will have similar functionality as well – moving and colliding with each other. The best way to do this is with a class: a blueprint for each ball that I will make copies of when I need a new ball on the table.

class Ball:
def __init__(self, image, pos):
self.actor = Actor(image, center=pos, anchor=(“center”, “center”))
self.movement = [0, 0]
self.pocketed = False

def move(self):
self.actor.x += self.movement[0]
self.actor.y += self.movement[1]
if self.pocketed == False:
if self.actor.y < playArea.top + 16 or self.actor.y > playArea.bottom-16:
self.movement[1] = -self.movement[1]
self.actor.y = clamp(self.actor.y, playArea.top+16, playArea.bottom-16)
if self.actor.x < playArea.left+16 or self.actor.x > playArea.right-16:
self.movement[0] = -self.movement[0]
self.actor.x = clamp(self.actor.x, playArea.left+16, playArea.right-16)
else:
self.actor.x += self.movement[0]
self.actor.y += self.movement[1]
self.resistance()

def resistance(self):
# Slow the ball down
self.movement[0] *= 0.95
self.movement[1] *= 0.95

if abs(self.movement[0]) + abs(self.movement[1]) < 0.4:
self.movement = [0, 0]

The best part about using a class is that I only need to make one piece of code to move a ball, and I can reuse it for every ball on the table. I’m using an array to keep track of the ball’s movement – how much it will move each frame. I also need to make sure it bounces off the sides of the play area if it hits them. I’ll use an array to hold all the balls on the table.

To start with, I need a cue ball:

balls = []
cue_ball = Ball(“cue_ball.png”, (WIDTH//2, HEIGHT//2))
balls.append(cue_ball)

Aiming the shot

In Side Pocket, players control a dotted line that shows where the cue ball will go when they take a shot. Using the joystick or arrow buttons rotated the shot and moved the line, so players could aim to get the balls in the pockets (see Figure 2). To achieve this, we have to dive into our first bit of maths, converting a rotation in degrees to a pair of x and y movements. I decided my rotation would be at 0 degrees when pointing straight up; the player can then press the right and left arrow to increase or decrease this value.

Figure 2: The dotted line shows the trajectory of the ball. Pressing the left or right arrows rotates the aim.

Pygame Zero has some built-in attributes for checking the keyboard, which I’m taking full advantage of.

shot_rotation = 270.0 # Start pointing up table
turn_speed = 1
line = [] # To hold the points on my line
line_gap = 1/12
max_line_length = 400
def update():
global shot_rotation

## Rotate your aim
if keyboard[keys.LEFT]:
shot_rotation -= 1 * turn_speed
if keyboard[keys.RIGHT]:
shot_rotation += 1 * turn_speed

# Make the rotation wrap around
if shot_rotation > 360:
shot_rotation -= 360
if shot_rotation < 0:
shot_rotation += 360

At 0 degrees, my cue ball’s movement should be 0 in the x direction and -1 in y. When the rotation is 90 degrees, my x movement would be 1 and y would be zero; anything in between should be a fraction between the two numbers. I could use a lot of ‘if-elses’ to set this, but an easier way is to use sin and cos on my angle – I sin the rotation to get my x value and cos the rotation to get the y movement.

# The in-built functions need radian
rot_radians = shot_rotation * (math.pi/180)

x = math.sin(rot_rads)
y = -math.cos(rot_rads)
if not shot:
current_x = cue_ball.actor.x
current_y = cue_ball.actor.y
length = 0
line = []
while length < max_line_length:
hit = False
if current_y < playArea.top or current_y > playArea.bottom:
y = -y
hit = True
if current_x < playArea.left or current_x > playArea.right:
x = -x
hit = True
if hit == True:
line.append((current_x-(x*line_gap), current_y-(y*line_gap)))
length += math.sqrt(((x*line_gap)**2)+((y*line_gap)**2) )
current_x += x*line_gap
current_y += y*line_gap
line.append((current_x-(x*line_gap), current_y-(y*line_gap)))

I can then use those x and y co-ordinates to create a series of points for my aiming line.

Shooting the ball

To keep things simple, I’m only going to have a single shot speed – you could improve this design by allowing players to load up a more powerful shot over time, but I won’t do that here.

shot = False
ball_speed = 30


## Inside update
## Shoot the ball with the space bar
if keyboard[keys.SPACE] and not shot:
shot = True
cue_ball.momentum = [x*ball_speed, y*ball_speed]

When the shot variable is True, I’m going to move all the balls on my table – at the beginning, this is just the cue ball – but this code will also move the other balls as well when I add them.

# Shoot the ball and move all the balls on the table
else:
shot = False
balls_pocketed = []
collisions = []
for b in range(len(balls)):
# Move each ball
balls[b].move()
if abs(balls[b].momentum[0]) + abs(balls[b].momentum[1]) > 0:
shot = True

Each time I move the balls, I check whether they still have some movement left. I made a resistance function inside the ball class that will slow them down.

Collisions

Now for the final problem: getting the balls to collide with each other and the pockets. I need to add more balls and some pocket actors to my game in order to test the collisions.

balls.append(Ball(“ball_1.png”, (WIDTH//2 - 75, HEIGHT//2)))
balls.append(Ball(“ball_2.png”, (WIDTH//2 - 150, HEIGHT//2)))

pockets = []
pockets.append(Actor(“pocket.png”, topleft=(playArea.left, playArea.top), anchor=(“left”, “top”)))
# I create one of these actors for each pocket, they are not drawn

Each ball needs to be able to collide with the others, and when that happens, the direction and speed of the balls will change. Each ball will be responsible for changing the direction of the ball it has collided with, and I add a new function to my ball class:

def collide(self, ball):
collision_normal = [ball.actor.x - self.actor.x, ball.actor.y - self.actor.y]
ball_speed = math.sqrt(collision_normal[0]**2 + collision_normal[1]**2)
self_speed = math.sqrt(self.momentum[0]**2 + self.momentum[1]**2)
if self.momentum[0] == 0 and self.momentum[1] == 0:
ball.momentum[0] = -ball.momentum[0]
ball.momentum[1] = -ball.momentum[1]
elif ball_speed > 0:
collision_normal[0] *= 1/ball_speed
collision_normal[1] *= 1/ball_speed
ball.momentum[0] = collision_normal[0] * self_speed
ball.momentum[1] = collision_normal[1] * self_speed

When a collision happens, the other ball should move in the opposite direction to the collision. This is what allows you to line-up slices and knock balls diagonally into the pockets. Unlike the collisions with the edges, I can’t just reverse the x and y movement. I need to change its direction, and then give it a part of the current ball’s speed. Above, I’m using a normal to find the direction of the collision. You can think of this as the direction to the other ball as they collide.

Our finished pool game. See if you can expand it with extra balls and maybe a scoring system.

Handling collisions

I need to add to my update loop to detect and store the collisions to be handled after each set of movement.

# Check for collisions
for other in balls:
if other != b and b.actor.colliderect(other.actor):
collisions.append((b, other))
# Did it sink in the hole?
in_pocket = b.actor.collidelistall(pockets)
if len(in_pocket) > 0 and b.pocketed == False:
if b != cue_ball:
b.movement[0] = (pockets[in_pocket[0]].x - b.actor.x) / 20
b.movement[1] = (pockets[in_pocket[0]].y - b.actor.y) / 20
b.pocket = pockets[in_pocket[0]]
balls_pocketed.append(b)
else:
b.x = WIDTH//2
b.y = HEIGHT//2

First, I use the colliderect() function to check if any of the balls collide this frame – if they do, I add them to a list. This is so I handle all the movement first and then the collisions. Otherwise, I’m changing the momentum of balls that haven’t moved yet. I detect whether a pocket was hit as well; if so, I change the momentum so that the ball heads towards the pocket and doesn’t bounce off the walls anymore.

When all my balls have been moved, I can handle the collisions with both the other balls and the pockets:

for col in collisions:
col[0].collide(col[1])
if shot == False:
for b in balls_pocketed:
balls.remove(b)

And there you have it: the beginnings of an arcade pool game in the Side Pocket tradition. You can get the full code and assets right here.

Get your copy of Wireframe issue 36

You can read more features like this one in Wireframe issue 36, available directly from Raspberry Pi Press — we deliver worldwide. And if you’d like a handy digital version of the magazine, you can also download issue 36 for free in PDF format.

Make sure to follow Wireframe on Twitter and Facebook for updates and exclusive offers and giveaways. Subscribe on the Wireframe website to save up to 49% compared to newsstand pricing!

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