Tag Archives: Software

Arduino Create comes to Chrome OS devices!

via Arduino Blog

Arduino Create is now available to everyone on Chrome OS devices, with $0.99 per month subscription. An Arduino account and Google ID is all you need to use it, just follow the Create Getting Started guide on your Chrome OS device. We are actively working on specific licensing and pricing for schools, so stay tuned.

The new Arduino Create Chrome App enables students and other users to write code, access tutorials, configure boards, and share projects. Designed to provide a continuous workflow from inspiration to implementation, Makers can easily manage every aspect of their project right from a single dashboard.

Developed with the classroom in mind: The Arduino Chrome App allows you to teach and tinker with Arduino electronics and programming in a collaborative, always-up-to-date environment.

Built for Chrome OS: Code online, save your sketches in the cloud, and upload them to any Arduino connected to your Chrome OS device, without having to install anything locally. All the contributed libraries are automatically included.

The following Arduinos are currently supported: Uno, 101, Mega, Esplora, Nano (ATmega328), Micro, Zero, MKR1000, MKR Zero, MKR Fox 1200, Pro and Pro Mini (ATmega328). We are actively working with the Chromium team to restore support for the Arduino Leonardo in a future Chrome OS release.

The launch of this app would not have been possible without the following open source components:

As usual if you encounter any bugs, issues, or have an idea on how we can improve the Chrome app, please open a discussion thread on this Forum page.
Please note that this app will work only on Chrome OS, if you click on the Google Store link on any other OS you will not be able to install it.

8-bit assembler compiler project

via Dangerous Prototypes

8-bit assembler compiler

Dilshan Jayakody writes, “8-bit Assembler compiler is NASM compatible assembler compiler to generate binaries for 8-bit x86 like CPUs. The binaries produced with this compiler can execute on Marco Schweighauser’s 8-bit virtual Javascript CPU.
This native compiler can build using Lazarus / FPC. During the implementation we build and test this compiler successfully on Linux and Windows operating systems.”

More details at Dilshan Jayakody’s blog.

8-bit assembler compiler project

via Dangerous Prototypes

8-bit assembler compiler

Dilshan Jayakody writes, “8-bit Assembler compiler is NASM compatible assembler compiler to generate binaries for 8-bit x86 like CPUs. The binaries produced with this compiler can execute on Marco Schweighauser’s 8-bit virtual Javascript CPU.
This native compiler can build using Lazarus / FPC. During the implementation we build and test this compiler successfully on Linux and Windows operating systems.”

More details at Dilshan Jayakody’s blog.

Web Editor updates: Import your sketchbook and more

via Arduino Blog

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Some useful updates on the Arduino Web Editor!

Are you sticking to the desktop Arduino IDE because all your work is saved locally? That’s no longer a problem! Our brand new import tool enables you to upload your entire sketchbook with just a few clicks on the Arduino Web Editor. It is particularly handy because it lets you move all your sketches and libraries to the cloud in a single flow.

Once your sketches and libraries are online, they will be available on any device and backed up. For details on how to migrate all your code online, check out this tutorial.

Screenshot 2016-12-06 14.48.49-01

Sadly, Codebender is shutting down. You can use the import feature also to easily migrate to the Web Editor. (More details here.)

If you have a big sketchbook, you may want to clean up or categorize things once in awhile. With our bulk action tool, you can delete, move, or download multiple sketches at the same time. Go to the Sketchbook panel, hover on the sketch icon, and select all the files you want to act on. Doubts on how this will work? Learn more in this guide.

BulkSelect

What’s coming next?

We are currently working on a super streamlined way to edit your libraries within the Web Editor, and looking for the best way to implement the Chromebook plugin. Stay tuned!

3 simple filtering techniques to eliminate noise

via Arduino Blog

plant-data

Increasing accuracy in the collection of data coming from sensors is a need that, sooner or later, Makers need to face. Paul Martinsen from MegunoLink created a tutorial to eliminate noise from sensor readings on Arduino with three simple filtering techniques.

The Averaging and Running Average techniques are easy to implement as they work by adding a number of measurements together, then dividing the total by the number of measurements. In both cases, the downside is that it can use a lot of memory.

The Exponential filter is a better solution for several reasons: it doesn’t require much memory, you can control how much filtering is applied with a single parameter, and it saves battery power because you don’t need to make many measurements at once. For this solution, they developed an Arduino filter library so you don’t need to go mad with math!

Filtering

Interested? You can find the tutorial and explore the code on MegunoLing’s blog post here.

Software, the unsung hero

via Raspberry Pi

This column is from The MagPi issue 48. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals. The MagPi 48

As Raspberry Pi enthusiasts, we tend to focus a lot on hardware. When a new or updated board is released, it garners a lot of attention and excitement. On one hand, that’s sensible because Raspberry Pi is a leader in pushing the boundaries of affordable hardware. On the other hand, it tends to overshadow the fact that strong software support makes an enormous contribution to Raspberry Pi’s success in education, hobby, and industrial markets.

Because of that, I want to take the opportunity this month to highlight how important software is for Raspberry Pi. Whether you’re using our computer as a desktop replacement, a project platform, or a learning tool, you depend on an enormous amount of software built on top of the hardware. From the foundation of the Linux kernel, all the way up to the graphical user interface of the application you’re using, you rely on the work of many people who have spent countless hours designing, developing, and testing software.

clean_desktop

The look and feel of the desktop environment in Raspbian serves as a good signal of the progress being made to the software made specifically for Raspberry Pi. I encourage you to compare the early versions of Raspbian’s desktop environment to what you get when you download Raspbian today. Many little tweaks are made with each release, and they’ve really built up to make a huge difference in the user experience.

Skin deep

And keep in mind that’s only considering the desktop interface of Raspbian. The improvements to the operating system under the hood go well beyond what you might notice on screen. For Raspberry Pi, there’s been updates for firmware, more functionality, and improved hardware drivers. All of this is in addition to the ongoing improvements to the Linux kernel for all supported platforms.

For those of us who are hobbyists, we have access to so many code libraries contributed by developers, so that we can create things easily with Raspberry Pi in a ton of different programming languages. As you probably know, the power of Raspberry Pi lies in its GPIO pins which make it perfect for physical computing projects, much like the ones you find in the pages of The MagPi. New Python libraries like GPIO Zero make it even easier than ever to explore physical computing. What used to take four lines of code is boiled down to just LED.blink(), for example.

etcher-500pxwide

Not all software that helps us was made to run on Raspberry Pi directly. Take, for instance, Etcher, a wonderful program from the team at Resin.io. Etcher is the easiest SD card flasher I have ever used, and takes a lot of guesswork out of flashing SD cards with Raspbian or any other operating system. Those of us who write tutorials are especially happy about this; since Etcher is cross-platform, you don’t need to have a separate set of instructions for people running Windows, Mac, and Linux. In addition, its well-designed graphical interface is a sight for sore eyes, especially for those of us who have been using command line tools for SD card flashing.

The list of amazing software that supports Raspberry Pi could go on for pages, but I only have limited space here. So I’ll leave you with my favourite point about Raspberry Pi’s strong software support. When you get a Raspberry Pi today and download Raspbian, you can rest assured that, because of the rapidly improving software support, it will only get better with age. You certainly can’t say that about everything you buy.

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