Tag Archives: Teardowns

Teardown of an Extech 380460 milliohm meter

via Dangerous Prototypes

Extech380460

Kerry Wong did a teardown of an Extech 380460  miliohm meter:

This is a highly specialized instrument, all it does is measuring low ohm range resistance (from 200mΩ to 2000Ω in five ranges) and nothing else. The meter came with a rugged case which is handy for field use, although its portability is hampered by the requirement of a wall outlet.
Since this meter is designed for low resistance measurement, it came with a set of 4 wire Kelvin clips. The stock leads are not my favorite though, as the design uses rubber rings to hold the two clip pieces together. One issue of this (instead of proper spring tensioned clips) is that the tension is quite weak and it is difficult to make secure contact with small dimension leads. Also, the rubber ring is likely to lose tension and fail over repeated use.

See the full post on his blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Teardown and testing of an 800W PureSine inverter

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Kerry Wong has posted a detailed teardown and testing of a Reliable Electric 800W PureSine Inverter:

The last ingredient for my backup power project is an inverter. Since the battery bank I built is a 12V 1.5kWh one, an inverter that can handle a load between 500W and 1000W would be a suitable choice. In theory, all the lights and the refrigerator in my house consume just around 500W. So the 1.5kWh battery bank should be able to power all the essentials for at least a couple of hours in the event of a power failure.
I wanted a pure sine wave inverter as opposed to a modified sine wave inverter since many household appliances and electronics do not play well with modified sine wave inverters due to the high harmonic distortions. After some extensive research, I finally settled on this 12V 800W pure sine inverter made by a little known Chinese company Yueqing Reliable Electric Co. Ltd.

See the full post on his blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Teardown and repair of an Agilent E3632A DC power supply

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Teardown and repair of an Agilent E3632A DC power supply from The Signal Path:

In this episode Shahriar & Rosanah investigate an Agilent power supply which does not appear to power on. It can be quickly observed that the fuse has failed on the unit. Using an isolation transformer a small amount of AC voltage is applied to the unit after the fuse replacement. It is clear that a short is present somewhere in the instrument since even at 10V AC the instrument consumes more than 1A.

See the full post at thesignalpath.com.

Check out the video after the break.

Teardown and experiments with a Doppler microwave transceiver

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Kerry Wong did a teardown of Microsemi’s C900502 X-band planar transceiver:

I got a couple of Microsemi’s C900502 10.525 GHz X-band Doppler radar motion sensors a while ago. This batch was made in UK and had “UK patents 2243495 and/or 2253108 apply” printed on the case. I have seen a teardown of an HB100 Doppler radar module before and was wondering if I this one is any different inside.

See the full post on his blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Teardown of a Philips dimmable LED bulb

via Dangerous Prototypes

philipsLED-600

Kerry Wong did a teardown of a Philips dimmable LED bulb:

One of the first things you will notice about this light bulb is that the compact construction. Most noticeably the lack of the telltale heatsink fins. As a result however, the heat dissipation capability is greatly sacrificed. During normal operation when mounted pointing downwards without any airflow obstruction, the case temperature raised to above 60°C within a few minutes. I could only imagine what the temperature would be like when the light bulb is mounted facing upwards in a semi-enclosed light fixture.
So I decided to take it apart to see the what the construction looks like inside.

See the full post on his blog.

Check out the video after the break.