Tag Archives: The MagPi

Raspberry Pi Zero: the $5 computer

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Of all the things we do at Raspberry Pi, driving down the cost of computer hardware remains one of the most important. Even in the developed world, a programmable computer is a luxury item for a lot of people, and every extra dollar that we ask someone to spend decreases the chance that they’ll choose to get involved.

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The original Raspberry Pi Model B and its successors put a programmable computer within reach of anyone with $20-35 to spend. Since 2012, millions of people have used a Raspberry Pi to get their first experience of programming, but we still meet people for whom cost remains a barrier to entry. At the start of this year, we began work on an even cheaper Raspberry Pi to help these people take the plunge.

Four fathers!?!??

Four fathers!?!??

Today, I’m pleased to be able to announce the immediate availability of Raspberry Pi Zero, made in Wales and priced at just $5. Zero is a full-fledged member of the Raspberry Pi family, featuring:

  • A Broadcom BCM2835 application processor
    • 1GHz ARM11 core (40% faster than Raspberry Pi 1)
  • 512MB of LPDDR2 SDRAM
  • A micro-SD card slot
  • A mini-HDMI socket for 1080p60 video output
  • Micro-USB sockets for data and power
  • An unpopulated 40-pin GPIO header
    • Identical pinout to Model A+/B+/2B
  • An unpopulated composite video header
  • Our smallest ever form factor, at 65mm x 30mm x 5mm

Raspberry Pi Zero runs Raspbian and all your favourite applications, including Scratch, Minecraft and Sonic Pi. It is available today in the UK from our friends at element14, The Pi Hut and Pimoroni, and in the US from Adafruit and in-store at your local branch of Micro Center. We’ve built several tens of thousands of units so far, and are building more, but we expect demand to outstrip supply for the next little while.

One more thing: because the only thing better than a $5 computer is a free computer, we are giving away a free Raspberry Pi Zero on the front of each copy of the December issue of The MagPi, which arrives in UK stores today. Russell, Rob and the team have been killing themselves putting this together, and we’re very pleased with how it’s turned out. The issue is jam-packed with everything you need to know about Zero, including a heap of project ideas, and an interview with Mike Stimson, who designed the board.

MagPi #40 in all its glory

MagPi #40 in all its glory

If you’re looking for cables to go with your free Zero, head over to the newly revamped Swag Store, where we’re offering a bundle comprising a mini-HDMI and a micro-USB adapter for just £4, or alternatively subscribe and we’ll send you them for free.


Happy hacking!​

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The Official Raspberry Pi Projects Book is out now!

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Rob from The MagPi here again! Two posts from me in one week? You’re a very lucky bunch.

One thing we’re very proud of at The MagPi is the quality of our content: articles, features, tutorials, guides, reviews, inspirational projects and all the other bits and pieces that have made The MagPi great for 39 issues and counting. When we went back into actual print in a big way with issue 36, we had people asking us whether we’d ever release issues 31-35 as printed copies; we assume they wanted copies to frame and hang on their walls, or maybe to donate to a museum collection. Either way, we definitely haven’t been ignoring your cries.

A picture of the cover of the Official Raspberry Pi Projects book

200 pages. Dozens of articles. Out right this second.



Instead of releasing these individual issues in the Swag Store like in the old days, we decided to give them the shelf space in bricks-and-mortar shops that they deserved all along. So please welcome The Official Raspberry Pi Projects Book, packed with 200 pages full of the best projects, tutorials, reviews and much, much more, out right now for only £12.99!

You’ll find it in the magazine racks next to (or very near) The MagPi, and to be honest the image doesn’t do the cover justice. It’s beautifully glossy and slightly embossed. It’s definitely worth popping down to WHSmiths just to be dazzled by its glory.

Otherwise, you can grab a copy from the Swag Store, get a copy in our app available for Android and iOS, or grab the free PDF of the whole thing!

A picture of the contents spread of the Official Raspberry Pi Projects book

With almost 100 articles in the book, there are definitely a few things for everyone.
Click for a larger image.

Even if you’re not so bothered about completing your collection of The MagPi (however much it breaks my heart), this is a book with 200 pages of fantastic Raspberry Pi content that’s extremely handy if you want ideas for more awesome stuff to do with your Raspberry Pi. I’d like to point out that it’s a darn good stocking stuffer as well, what with it being only five weeks until Christmas and all.

We hope you all enjoy this book, however you plan to use it. And don’t forget to look out for our very exciting issue 40, out next Thursday. You absolutely will not want to miss it.

Anyway, on Monday I put a Picard gif at the end of the post. So here’s another. [This is a thing with Rob; we’re humouring him. Tell us in comments if you want us to make him stop – Ed.] See you next time!

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Digital, free, forever: the first 30 issues of The MagPi

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The MagPi issues one to 30 are now free, forever.

Hopefully that’s caught your attention. Some of you may now be wondering, “hang on, those issues of The MagPi were always free as PDFs, and so are all the newer ones as well!” And you’d be right: every issue of The MagPi has always been released as a free PDF download, and always will be, but we’re talking about our digital platform. Specifically, our app.

Did you know we have an app? It’s really great; it adds an extra layer of readability over the PDFs of the magazine, it remembers your place, and you can subscribe to it so that you always have a copy of The MagPi the moment it’s released. We charge a paltry £2.99 for single digital issues, half the price of our print ones, and £19.99 for a year’s subscription. The best part is, you don’t have to invest in a wheelbarrow to carry all your copies around with you everywhere!

Screenshot of The MagPi app with a selection of magazines in view

Just scroll down in the app to find the issues in beautiful digital HD glory


While these new issues are £2.99 we’ve also put up the first 30 issues of The MagPi for the low, low price of nothing. Zilch. Nada. Completely free.

We don’t want you to feel like you’re missing out on a complete set in our app, so it’s our promise to you that not only will they remain there, they’ll always be free as an excellent complement to your current and any future digital versions of The MagPi.

You can grab the app on the Google Play Store for Android devices and the Apple App Store for iOS now, and relive some great moments from The MagPi’s history.

Like when we showed you how to make an Engima-style cipher in issue 25:

The cover of issue 25 of The MagPi, showing an Enigma machine

Cryptography is important to know in today’s computer world

Or all the little robots that we made:

Two covers of The MagPi side-by-side, each showing a robot

Robots are cool

And don’t forget the great interviews!

An issue of The MagPi with Lady Ada on the front

We love talking to important people about great things

So grab them all today and make yourself feel like Captain Picard, picking up an (i)PADD after a long day of telling off Wesley, so he can dig into some of his favourite literature of early Twenty-First Century Earth. We’d like to think he’d have given The MagPi a shot between Shakespeare and noir adventures.

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Learn to love the command line with The MagPi

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Conquer the Command Line, written by resident Bash expert Richard Smedley for The MagPi, offers ten chapters of essential tips and tricks to help you master the command line…

When we first turned The MagPi into the official Raspberry Pi magazine, we made two very distinct commitments. One was to ensure the magazine represents the needs and celebrates the achievements of the Raspberry Pi community. The other was to ensure all the content we produce should be available free, now and forever.

Last week The MagPi released the first offering in a new series of e-books called The MagPi Essentials. The first release is designed to help you learn to love the command line, and, like everything else we produce, it’s available as a free Creative Commons-licensed PDF.

Learn to love the command line

Learn to love the command line by trying our Essentials e-book

Here’s an excerpt from the introduction to get you in the mood:

Sometimes only words will do.
Graphic user interfaces (GUIs) were a great advance,
creating an easy route into computer use
for many non-technical users. For complex tasks,
though, the interface can become a limitation:
blocking off choices, and leaving a circuitous route
even for only moderately complicated jobs.

(Re-)Enter the command line: the blinking cursor
that many thought had faded away some time in
the 1990s. For getting instructions from user to
computer – in a clear, quick and unambiguous form
– the command line is often the best way. It never
disappeared on Unix systems, and now, thanks to
Raspbian on the Raspberry Pi, a new generation
are discovering the power of the command line
to simplify complex tasks, or instantly carry
out simple ones.

In short: if you’re one of the many Raspberry Pi users not comfortable when faced with the command prompt, don’t panic! Conquer the Command Line is designed to help you feel at home, and equip you with the skills you need to find your way around the Raspberry Pi terminal (or any other GNU/Linux computer for that matter).

Here’s a quick breakdown of what you can expect to learn:

  • Read and write text files
  • Find and install software
  • Manage removable storage
  • Use Secure Shell for remote access
  • Create Raspberry Pi SD cards
  • Customise the command line
  • and much, much more.
Click the tablet to download your PDF copy

Click the tablet to download your PDF copy (2.3MB)

We’ll be following up Conquer the Command Line with a new book in The MagPi Essentials range soon. Assuming enough of you want them, we might even be tempted into releasing a printed A5 box set of the series too.

If you’d like to support the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s charitable aims you can also buy Conquer the Command Line on your favourite Apple or Android device for £2.99 / $3.99. The MagPi app itself is entirely free to download and comes complete with the first 30 issues of the magazine entirely free!
app_store google_play

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The MagPi #39 is out now!

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The November issue of the official Raspberry Pi magazine, The MagPi, is available now in print and digital. This month our cover feature is all about amazing Raspberry Pi projects that can be made in moments.

click to see the latest issue in all its geeky glory

Time isn’t always on our side, so it’s great to have a quick-fire project you can fire up when you have a spare moment.

They’re also handy to keep the attention of younger hackers, whose making adventures are that much more gratifying when they can achieve something amazing in short amount of time.

Highlights from #39: 

  • 30-Minute projects
  • Introducing GPIO Zero
  • Time-lapse photography
  • Pixel art with the Sense HAT
  • Eight-pageTouchscreen Display special
  • and much more!

Embiggen for a full tour of the latest issue

We’ve got lots of inspiring projects and features for for you to get your teeth into this month, including a whopping eight-page special dedicated to the official Touchscreen Display.

We also speak to the Foundation’s new CEO, Philip Colligan, about what 2016 has in store, while we also review the latest updates to Raspbian and Scratch. Elsewhere we chat with Ben Nuttall about GPIO ZERO to find out exactly how it’s lowering the barrier to entry for physical computing projects at home and in schools. Exciting stuff!

#39 GPIO Zero #39 Mason Jar

As always you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free. Grab it straight from the front page of The MagPi’s new-look website.

If you want something more tangible to prop-up on your desk while you code, you’ll be glad to hear you can get the print edition in more stores than ever:

And all good newsagents

US readers can grab the previous issue from either Barnes & Noble or MicroCenter.

Don’t forget that – like sales of the Raspberry Pi itself – all proceeds from the print and digital editions of the magazine go to help the Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

Rather shop online? The Raspberry Pi Swag Store has copies available – better grab one before it’s sold out!

Swag Store MagPi

Grab a copy online today and have it delivered anywhere in the world!

We’ve updated our subscriptions offerings. Save up to 25% on the cover price with our various subscription options.

Subscribe today for as little as £12.99 / $37.50

Finally, we’ve just launched an eBook! It’s the first of a new The MaPi Essentials range that we’ll be expanding throughout 2016.

It’s currently available as a free download and as a digital edition on The MagPi app for Android and Apple devices. If you’d like to see this as a cute little A5 pocket book – let us know!

It’s dedicated to helping you learn the command line and features all the amazing tutorials from Richard Smedley’s excellent series, plus two bonus chapters you’ll only find the book.

Learn to love the command line – click the pic for more details

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Issue #38 of The MagPi magazine has landed

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The October issue of the official Raspberry Pi magazine has arrived in more stores than ever. Grab it in print or as a digital download and take on the ultimate weekend project for £50 / $75!

Click to see the latest issue on our new-look website!

Click to see the latest issue on our new-look website

Highlights from #38: 
  • Build a Raspberry Pi robot for £50 / $75
  • Make a web-powered plant waterer
  • Create music with the Piano HAT
  • Raspberry Pi Touchscreen Display reviewed
  • Spooky Halloween projects
  • and much more!
Take a closer look at what's inside this issue

Take a closer look at exactly what’s inside the October issue

UK readers can buy it today in newsagents, WHSmiths & Tesco, while US readers can buy the previous issue in Barnes & Noble or MicroCenter.

Buy now from the Raspberry Pi Swag Store and help support the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s charitable mission!

Call +44(0)1202 586848
or visit The MagPi Subscriptions site

Call toll free on 800-428-3003
or visit www.imsnews.com/magpi

As always you can download your copy of The MagPi completely free.
Just go to the new issue page to grab it!

Once more the amazing Mike Cook has put together another cracking Pi Bakery project for you to enjoy. This month it’s a particularly spooky Halloween project you can use to scare your friends and neighbours.

You can read our eight-page step-by-step guide to putting your own Mulder skull project together in this issue as well as loads of other cool Halloween project ideas!

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