Tag Archives: The MagPi

The MagPi issue 26 – out now!

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August’s MagPi, the magazine for the Raspberry Pi community written by the Raspberry Pi community, is out now. As always, it covers the whole spectrum of Pi users, from absolute beginners to people looking for challenges; and as always, it’s a free download.

MagPi issue 26

This month you’ll find a continuation of the robot series that kicked off last month, adding voice control, facial recognition and speech to your home-made friend. There’s a fun persistence of vision (POV) magic wand project, an in-depth introduction to the new Model B+, and a great example of a dynamic art application for total beginners.

Our favourite project this month is Mashberry, a home brewery project which you can control using a TV remote. There’s lots more too: click on the image above (or here) to read the latest issue.

The MagPi team are always looking for volunteers to help produce the magazine: there’s a lot involved in getting a monthly publication ready beyond the writing and proofing. They’re always looking for writers and proofreaders, but if you’re interested in the production side of things in particular – that’s layout, typesetting, graphical work and testing – they’d especially love you to get in touch. If you can help, email editor@themagpi.com, or comment on their Facebook
page.

MagPi issue 25 – out now!

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For your weekend reading pleasure, here’s issue 25 of the MagPi! Published just yesterday, the latest issue of everyone’s favourite free, monthly, community-produced Raspberry Pi magazine is as full of fantastic stuff as ever.

The MagPi issue25

Click to read The MagPi!

The cover story is one that’ll definitely get some attention in our house this weekend: it’s a full Python simulation of the Pocket Enigma Cipher Machine, a cleverly devised toy that demonstrates some of the principles of a real Enigma machine like the one many of you will recognise in the cover photo. Used by the German armed forces during World War II to encipher messages, these used rotating disks to achieve a sophisticated substitution cipher; the Pocket machine, and its Python simulation, use two disks to arrive at a fun, if not exactly unbreakable, cipher.

We’re delighted to see an article by Andrew Suttle, the MagPi’s youngest guest writer so far. Andrew reviews the Fish Dish, an easy-to-build add-on board aimed at beginners, which he has tested with ScratchGPIO and Python. Also aimed at beginners is a new series on learning BASIC, which opens this issue with the kind of background that has most of Pi Towers sighing wistfully and exchanging anecdotes about our childhoods.

There’s the second half of a two-part article on understanding networks and network analysis tools, an introduction to electronic measurement with Raspberry Pi and BitScope Micro, a background piece by one of the creators of the Navio autopilot shield which the many backers of its successful Indiegogo campaign will be eager to read, and — another personal favourite — a tutorial on building an iPad/iPhone control panel for Raspberry Pi with RasPiConnect, taking the wonderful MouseAir deluxe automated cat toy as its example.

As usual, there’s so much here that I can’t mention even half of the articles, tutorials and reviews you’ll find here for beginners, advanced users and everyone in between. Download your copy now!

MagPi issue 24, out now!

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The MagPi’s a little late this month, but it’s full of good things. The MagPi is the free magazine for Raspberry Pi enthusiasts, written, typeset and edited by the community for the community.

This month’s issue has plenty for Pi fans of all levels to get their teeth into.

MagPi Jun 14

Click the image to visit The MagPi

We’re biased, but our favourite article this month is the interview with our very own Carrie Anne Philbin about Picademy, our free teacher training courses, where she talks a lot about the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s approach to education. And our hearts went pitter-patter when we saw the Wolfram Language-powered spectrophotometer from Robert J LeSuer, which can be used to calibrate colours: in this instance Robert is using it to make sure his watermelon punch is precisely the correct shade of red. There’s the final instalment in Michael Petersen’s Weather Balloon series, a project from Daniel Pelikan which turns your Raspberry Pi into an oscilloscope, and much more.

The MagPi is a free download: the volunteers on the project donate their time and skill every month for free, and we are very grateful to them. If you’d like a printed magazine, we’re selling the MagPi’s Kickstarted binders of the first nineteen issues in the Swag Store: get them while they’re hot!

 

Happy second birthday to The MagPi!

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We were amazed to learn that this month’s edition represents The MagPi’s second anniversary. The MagPi is the Raspberry Pi magazine, produced by the community for the community; it has no association with us at the Foundation (besides the fact that we love it and think it’s the best thing since sliced maltloaf).

MagPi May 14

Click to read or download The MagPi

Ian McAlpine, one of the group of volunteers who produce the magazine every month, had this to say.

Looking back on Year 2 of The MagPi, the magazine has continued to grow from strength to strength. The MagPi is produced every month by a geographically dispersed group of volunteers and authors whose only motivation is to share their knowledge. By all accounts it shouldn’t work, yet here we are on our second birthday having just released Issue 23.

With an average monthly readership of 150K, The MagPi has had to evolve out of necessity. For our readers the visible change of our evolution came in issues 10 and 11 with the introduction of a more professional layout style, but one which provides a consistent template that allows new volunteers to learn Scribus quickly. With the increasing number of hits, our website at www.themagpi.com also got a significant refresh.

Behind the scenes there have been many changes. We moved from using Dropbox as a document repository to Git, which also has the added benefit of source control. Internally we have a bespoke “Magazine Management System” (MMS) which helps us manage the content of each issue, who is the article author, layouter, tester and proof reader, the state of progress of each article plus it tracks all the tickets for each article. The MMS is also the repository for the final PDFs which it merges automatically and uploads to Issuu.com every hour.

Our second year also saw the introduction of sponsored advertising. This was somewhat controversial. The MagPi is a community driven, peer-reviewed journal and it will always be available to download for free. But we wanted to also make it available as a printed magazine. We have been careful to limit the advertising in each issue, but it is with thanks to those advertisers that we are able to make printed editions of the magazine available each month. Additionally, we averaged 32 pages in each issue in our first year, but this has increased throughout our second year to 48 pages. Some issues of The MagPi have also been translated into Chinese, German, Korean, French and Spanish.

Ignoring our first year, in just this second year alone there have been a staggering 67 different authors who have produced over 100 articles. The MagPi exists because of these authors. There is also a core group of folks across the world who volunteer a huge amount of time every month to deliver The MagPi; William Bell, Bryan Butler, Tim Cox, Colin Deady, Matthew Judge, Ian McAlpine, Claire Price, Aaron Shaw and Ash Stone. There are many other unnamed volunteers and we thank them all for their help every month and for helping The MagPi to grow.

Finally thank you to you, our readers… without your support the efforts of everyone involved would be wasted. We hope you keep enjoying and reading The MagPi every month.

This month being a birthday month, there are a few special items in May’s issue, including a competition to win £2000 of kit. Thanks to all of you at The MagPi from all of us at the Raspberry Pi Foundation: we’re incredibly grateful for your support, and we’re always amazed at what you achieve every month.

MagPi issue 22

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I’m about two weeks late to the party on this one – massive apologies to all at The MagPi. It’s been a bit busy around here so far this month. Right now, Picademy’s underway in the office space we’ve got set up as a classroom, and 24 teachers are busy making blooping noises with Sonic Pi while Clive booms at them in Teachervoice. It’s distracting but curiously enjoyable.

Alongside the preparation for Picademy, this month we’ve seen the launch of this new website, and the announcement about the new Compute Module. While all this was going on, the April edition of The MagPi came out, and I didn’t notice because I was too busy glueing Raspberry Pi logos on sticks and sending boxes of jam to Johnny Ball (true story).

MagPi April 14

As usual, The MagPi is full of wonderful things like internet-enabled garage doors, night lights that repel under-bed goblins, reviews, competitions, tutorials and much more. My favourite article this month discusses a solar cell (this month’s cover star) that tracks the sun to provide 140% more energy than a static cell. Go and read it online for free: you can also order a printed copy for your personal library or for your school. Thanks MagPi folks – I promise to be more timely about letting people know about next month’s issue!

MagPi issue 21 – out now!

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Last month’s MagPi fundraiser for a Volume 2 binder was a roaring success: check out how they did on KickStarter.

MagPi issue 21

As you’ll know unless you’ve been living in an internet-free commune, The MagPi is the free, monthly Raspberry Pi magazine, created by the Raspberry Pi community. We at the Foundation have no involvement with The MagPi beyond thinking it’s terrific: there are tutorials, listings, project ideas and more for people of all levels; from kids picking up a Raspberry Pi for the first time, to the most grizzled and hairy of systems engineers.

This month’s issue has a second birthday interview with Eben (unfortunately this issue went to the typesetters when the news about Friday’s open source announcement from Broadcom was still under embargo, so make sure you read that too to get a complete picture of what we’ve been up to). You’ll find a project where you can use a Pi for maintaining a notoriously finicky saltwater aquarium for corals – Emma has already asked me if we can get one for the office – and type-in listings for a great old-school text adventure called Stronghold of the Dwarven Lords. There’s another instalment from Project Curacao, the tropical environmental monitoring setup, alongside a weather station project you can make at home, where the environment is less exciting. My favourite piece this issue is from 13-year-old Jacob Roberts, who made his Pi into a portable computer on a pocket-money budget. He’ll show you how you can do the same.

There’s internet radio, motion detection, book reviews, competitions and much more. We really look forward to the MagPi every month: it’s a great resource for all Pi users, and we’re grateful, as always, to Ash, Will, Aaron and the team of volunteers who work so hard on it every month. Thanks gang – we’re looking forward to April’s issue!

The MagPi – Kickstart the Volume 2 Binder for 432 pages of Pi goodness!

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The MagPi magazine is the single thing to have come out of the Raspberry Pi community that I’m proudest of, in a sort of godmotherly way – we at the Raspberry Pi Foundation do not have any association with The MagPi besides thinking it’s the best thing since sliced maltloaf.

They’ve got a new Kickstarter running.

The MagPi is a monthly free download, full of projects, tutorials, reviews and interviews about the Raspberry Pi. The magazine is staffed entirely by volunteers, and it’s just entering its third year of publication. Last year, the MagPi team served up a Kickstarter to bring the magazine to print, which proved really successful: print copies go down especially well if you’re using the magazine for reference or working through the tutorials. That Kickstarter meant that you could get hold of all of the first year’s magazine in a print version, with a handsome binder to put everything in. We have a couple of the first year’s binders filled with magazines in the office: the Pi Towers team finds the MagPi a really useful resource.

Many people have asked for another binder for the second year’s print copies, having accumulated a heap of them at home. So Team MagPi are running a short-duration Kickstarter to fund manufacture of a binder for Vol 2 (i.e. every edition of The MagPi that came out in 2013). They’re keeping it to a two-week funding run because financing a binder costs them much less than last year’s bid to pay for printing what had been a virtual magazine. You can pledge at different levels, so you can fund anything from a sticker, an empty Vol 2 binder for yourself, a Vol 2 binder with all of last year’s magazines inside, or both volumes – complete, of course, with binders.

The MagPi team don’t make a penny for themselves out of this: the project has always been run on a strictly voluntary basis, and it amazes us to see how the magazine continues to evolve, given that it’s run on a shoestring. They say:

Any extra funding will be used to fund the ongoing costs of producing The MagPi, plus it will allow us to explore other ways of expanding the availability of the magazine, introduce other types of content, and translations to other languages. Any profits after that will be invested into future print runs and the Raspberry Pi community.

You can back this project by clicking here, or on any of the images in this post. Good luck, MagPi people – it goes without saying, but we think you’re brilliant!

 

MagPi issue 20 – your free Raspberry Pi magazine, out now

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Issue 20, February 2014, of the excellent MagPi Magazine was released this week. I’m completely stealing the editorial by Matt from The MagPi team to introduce this issue (as you may have guessed, Liz is away. And I am not as good as Liz at this. There, I said it :) )  Anyway, read The MagPi! It’s jam packed with brilliant stuff as ever:

After a massive response, we are pleased to write that the article series ‘Bake your own Pi filling’ is back by popular demand! In this article Martin Kalitis throws down the gauntlet by instructing how to create a bootable Linux SD card which can load within 10 seconds.

Cover of Magpi magazine issue 20

We have more from the Caribbean with Project Curacao. This project has been so popular with our readers that John Shovic is extending it further, in a future issue, with a conclusion presenting the project’s results. In this issue John reviews the building and installation of the camera and shutter mount into the project, allowing the production of timed photos, before updating us on changes made to the project from past articles.

Deepak Patil introduces his project for panoramic photography using Pi-Pan, a robotic arm controlled by his Raspberry Pi to move his Pi Camera. Deepak looks at some of the code used to control this clever kit and discusses how to take pictures while out in your car.

We have more from Andy Baker’s Quadcopter series with this issue reviewing his pre-flight checks. His article looks at controlling the movement of the Quadcopter and provides some handy questions and answers for those of you who have been building this project.

We have a great article detailing John Hobson’s and Efrain Olivares’ journey into managing the frustrating problem of internet dropout. We then head over to France where Yann Caron presents his development environment and language ‘Algoid’, before the NanoXion chaps present their Raspberry Pi colocation service.

Clive again: just to add that The MagPi is a magazine produced by the Raspberry Pi community for the Raspberry Pi community. It will always be free to download; but if you prefer a physical magazine you can also buy print copies, thanks to the team’s successful Kickstarter. All the back issues are available for you to download, and they’re full of tutorials, interviews, type-in listings and everything you’ll need to get started with a Raspberry Pi.

MagPi issue 19 – your free Raspberry Pi magazine, out now

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December’s MagPi was released this morning, and it’s full of Christmas cheer. This month you’ll learn how to make your Pi sing carols with Sonic Pi; and you’ll find out about environmental monitoring, so you can keep your electricity bill down without having to turn off the tree lights.

We’re very taken by the first in a new series on building your own quadcopter: and by the second installment from Project Curacao, where a Pi is dangling from a radio tower twelve degrees north of the equator working on environmental monitoring, which makes us feel the cold and dark in Cambridge something rotten.

There’s plenty for beginners, with a continuation of Jake Marsh’s button and switch tutorial (if you’re looking for the earlier part of any of these series, they’re all available for free in back-copies of The MagPi); an OpenELEC tutorial and a tour of the Pi Store. And, of course, that Sonic Pi tutorial, where you’ll be able to program your Pi to play Good King Wenceslas with ease, even if this is the first time you’ve plugged a Raspberry Pi in.

One of our favourite projects this month is the electronic painting tutorial using XLoBorg, where you’ll find yourself Pollocking the night away. And on the practical side of things, you’ll find out how to add an LCD display to your projects via GPIO, and use it to scroll text.

The MagPi is a magazine produced by the Raspberry Pi community for the Raspberry Pi community. It will always be free to download; but if you prefer a physical magazine you can also buy print copies, thanks to the team’s successful Kickstarter. All the back issues are available for you to download, and they’re full of tutorials, interviews, type-in listings and everything you’ll need to get started with a Raspberry Pi.

Team MagPi is always looking for people to join them: at the moment they are particularly in need of volunteers to help with layout (you should be a Scribus user), and testers. You can get in touch with them via the MagPi website – tell them we sent you!

MagPi issue 18 – out now!

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Mail from the folks at the MagPi, the free to download magazine for the Raspberry Pi community, written by the Raspberry Pi community. November’s issue is out now.

This month’s cover star is Pi NoIR. You’ll learn much more about IR photography with Pi NoIR, find out what you can do with it, and why you might want to get your hands on one.

This month’s projects include a plant-monitoring system using a wireless sensor network, and more on interfacing with LEGO sensors and motors, this time using Scratch: an ideal project for beginners. The second part of Mod My Pi’s tutorial on using switches and buttons with your Pi is here, with plenty of other projects and tutorials on topics from the regular camera board to string streams in C++. You’ll find competitions, book reviews and much more besides.

Here at Pi Towers, we’ve been really interested to watch the development of Raspberry Jams and other Raspberry Pi events outside the UK, and were excited to find a report on the latest bilingual French/English Raspberry Pi event at CERN (I am dying to get to one of the CERN jams) in the form of an interview with one of the presenters, Google’s Bernhard Suter.

Raspberry Jam, CERN

It’s great to see from the events page how people are organising Pi activities all over the world now: you’ll see news about a Dubai Jam, as well as an Italian meeting – and plenty in the UK. And I’m all over a new series called Project Curacao, where John Shovic takes us step-by-step through the installation of an environmental monitoring system on the island of Curacao, just 12 degrees north of the equator. The Pi and its sensor equipment is hung from a radio tower, and is meant to deliver environmental information over a period of six months. John’s going to be talking about everything from powering and installing the project to programming it and interpreting its data.

I can’t believe how fast this month has gone. Enjoy this month’s magazine: as always, all the back issues are available for you to download and read for free at www.themagpi.com. The MagPi team is always looking for volunteers to help with everything from writing to production, so get in touch via their website if you can help.

The MagPi issue 17, out now

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October’s edition of The MagPi, the Raspberry Pi community magazine, which is written, edited and produced by Pi users for Pi users, is available for free download now.

If you’re a robotics hobbyist, you’ll find lots to occupy yourself in this month’s issue: there’s a thorough discussion of the BrickPi, a new addon from Dexter Industries which will allow you to connect your Pi to LEGO NXT motors, and pointers to projects you can make yourself with the setup, interfacing with Python and with Scratch.

My favourite project this month is from Jonathan Chetwynd (who posts here as Peepo). He’s used a head-mounted Raspberry Pi camera board to make an eye-tracking device. (I will not spoil this month’s best MagPi photo for you, which demonstrates what Jonathan calls “load balancing issues” when trying to use a pair of glasses as a mount for a Pi and its accessory bits and pieces.) It’s a mad, brilliant project, and I’m looking forward to seeing more of you replicate it and find out what you use it for.

This only scratches the surface: this month you’ll find tips and projects on games programming, sensors, and much more. (Cannon ball physics for your Scratch games from Will Bell is a real winner – if you’re a kid who wants to make an Angry Birds-type game, you’ll want to read this.)

If you’re new to the Raspberry Pi and don’t know where to start, the MagPi’s back catalogue is a great place to begin. It’s always free to download, it’s made by people who love the Pi and want to help you to get the most out of it, and it’s always a highlight of my month. Head over and get downloading!

MagPi issue 16: out today!

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There are a few changes at the MagPi, the free community magazine about the Raspberry Pi. First of all, you’ll notice they have a new website, with a new and easier layout. And as of today, as many of you have requested, some articles from the magazine are being converted to be readable in HTML format as well as published in the usual whole-magazine PDF form. So far, the team at the MagPi has converted Issue 13, and they’re planning on converting their entire back catalogue to HTML over the coming months, so eventually all articles from all the back issues should also be available to view as separate web pages. It’s a bit of a labour of love, and the team is made up entirely of volunteers, so please be patient while they work! They’ve also set up a blog for MagPi announcements, which you can find at www.themagpi.com/blog/.

This month’s MagPi is the fattest issue so far, with an article on PATOSS, the rescue-bird monitor we covered here in July, going into much more detail about the setup than has been available before, and explaining what progress Jorge Rancé has made since Pato and his broken leg hit the Raspberry Pi blog this summer. There’s more on the skutter robot (hurrah!), with tutorials on adding sensors. You’ll find out how to drive LCD displays, learn about FPGA, and read the usual smorgasbord of software tutorials. This month’s issue comes with two competitions for Pis and accessories – you can read the whole thing over at The MagPi.

MagPi issue 13: out now, and free to download!

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Team MagPi have wiped their bleary eyes after celebrating their first anniversary issue, and have come up with a magazine for June that will have you playing the Archimedes version of Elite on your Pi, writing racing games in Scratch, and making music with Schism. You’ll learn how to solder up a LED matrix, find out about the growing number of expansion boards available for your Pi – and this month, there’s a very special cover feature.

You might remember reading about Amy Mather here a few months ago. She’s thirteen, and she’s a super-articulate, super-smart young coder, who we think is one of the best advocates for computing we’ve come across. You can read an interview with Amy in this month’s magazine, where she talks about what resources are available for parents, about young people and coding, and offers us at the Foundation a few ideas for design changes. They’re good ones, too – and much more practical than some of the suggestions that adult readers make. (You, the chap who wanted us to move all the ports onto one side of the board. I’m looking at you.)

As always, there are plenty of type-in listings for you to get your teeth into, a competition, details on Pi events near you, and much more. As always, we at the Foundation would like to say a HUGE thank you to the MagPi team. They’re all volunteers, they don’t get any help from us, and they produce a free magazine every month that we think shows the very best of the Raspberry Pi community. Thanks, guys – we’re looking forward to next month’s issue!

A very happy first birthday to The MagPi!

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The MagPi is a free magazine made by Raspberry Pi fans for Raspberry Pi fans. It’s the example of just how remarkable the Raspberry Pi community is that we point to most often: volunteer enthusiasts with no publishing experience have been producing a really tight, entertaining, and educational magazine for twelve months now, and it’s just getting better and better.

The MagPi is a community magazine, which is not produced or otherwise fiddled around with by the Raspberry Pi Foundation. This month’s issue is a little more Foundation-heavy than usual, though, because it’s a celebratory edition: you’ll find an article from me, and (rather more interestingly) a very in-depth interview with Pete Lomas, our Grand Vizier of Hardware.

Most excitingly of all, there’s a birthday competition this month, where you can win £1000 of Pi hardware to play with. You’ll find a really helpful comparison of Raspberry Pi operating systems, a musical tutorial, an exploration of just how the Sweetbox guys went about bringing their case to market, and much more.

I don’t have enough good things to say about the MagPi team, and the crazy amount of work they’ve put in over the last year to help people get to grips with our little computer. All of us at the Foundation are full of admiration for the year’s achievements; running a magazine isn’t trivial, and with a staff of only volunteers it’s near impossible. That the MagPi is now in a position to start offering print copies (we know of many schools which are buying up bound copies of the first few volumes as a teaching resource) is an extraordinary thing, and we couldn’t be prouder to be associated with them.

Thank you so much, all of you: the writers, editors, layout and graphics, production, distribution team, proofreading army and advertising. The Raspberry Pi would not be where it is today, with about 1.3m units sold, without support from people like you showing everybody what can be done with it. We couldn’t be more grateful.

Issue 11 of the MagPi – out now!

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April’s MagPi has just been released. As well as all the usual goodies, this month the magazine (free to download, as always) contains features on controlling your house’s heating system using a Pi, a guide to turning your Pi into a wireless access point (I’m thinking of pointing one in the general direction of my village bus stop, where I often find myself standing with only a 2G signal for my phone, waiting impatiently until the bus turns up half an hour late), and some really cute Minecraft pointers. This month’s cover, as you can see, was designed in Minecraft: Pi Edition.

There are competitions in which you can win a Pi and add-ons like a Quick2Wire kit, and, excitingly, an opportunity to win one of the very scarce blue Raspberry Pis which were produced by RS components for our first anniversary. (They’re so scarce we don’t even have one at the Foundation!)

Thanks, as always, to the MagPi team – you guys do an amazing job.

If you’re interested in contributing to the magazine, whether your skill is in writing, designing, typesetting or other production work, give Ash and the team a shout at editor@themagpi.com. At the moment they’re particularly in need of someone to help with testing and other technical editorial work; as well as someone with layout skills.