Tag Archives: tutorial

Overdrive guitar effects pedal

via Dangerous Prototypes

pstomp-600

Eddie over at Bantam Tools shared detailed instructions of how to build this DIY overdrive effects pedal:

This project shows you how to make your very own effects stompbox! We’ll go through the steps of downloading the .brd file, loading the file into our software, milling the board on the Bantam Tools Desktop PCB Milling Machine, and soldering the components. This is a great tutorial for those new to milling printed circuit boards (PCBs) or for those who want practice soldering components to the board as a part of a larger assembly.

More info at Bantam Tools project page.

How to: STM32F103C8T6 as an USB device (Virtual serial port / CDC)

via Dangerous Prototypes

In this video Hugatry shared detailed instructions of how to use the STM32F103C8T6 as an USB device with virtual serial port:

Cheap STM32F103C8T6 development board
Blue STM32F103C8T6 development boards, also known as “BluePill”, are cheap way to get started with 32bit ARM microcontrollers. The STM32 development board can sometimes be bought for less than $2 and ST-LinkV2 compatible programmer and debugger doesn’t cost much more than that either.
The STM32F103C8T6 has nice amount of flash and RAM, runs at 72MHz and best of all: It has built-in USB. It is possible to program these STM32 boards to act as an USB devices, without “FTDI chip”. In this post and in the embedded video I will teach step by step how to use the STM32F103C8T6 as an USB device, in particular a virtual serial port.

More details at Hugatry’s HackVlog.

Tutorial, experiments and teardown of a 77GHz automotive FMCW radar module

via Dangerous Prototypes

Radar-300x167

Tutorial, experiments and teardown of a 77GHz automotive FMCW radar module from The Signal Path:

In this episode Shahriar explores the principle operation of automotive FMCW radars. Thanks to a donated automotive radar module, various components of the system can be examined and explored. The PCB reveals three die-on-PCB ASICs responsible for generating and receiving 77GHz FMCW signals coupled to a 2D array of antennas. Several microwave components such as rat-race couplers and branchline couplers can also be observed. PCB rulers from SV1AFN Design Lab also show these microwave components at much lower frequencies. Two other ICs are used for ramp generation and PLL as well as a multi-input LNA/PGA/AAF with 12-bit ADC for IF processing. All components are examined under the microscope and the frequency of operation is calculated by measuring the branchline coupler’s dimensions.
Finally a simple Doppler effect radar is constructed by using a doubler, power divider, mixer and a pair of Vivaldi horn antennas. The Doppler effect can be observed by moving an object in front of the antenna pair.

More details at thesignalpath.com.

Check out the video after the break.

Hacker House Smartphone-Connected Door Lock

via Raspberry Pi

The team at YouTube channel Hacker House always deliver when it comes to clear, detailed tutorials, and their newest project, ‘How to Make a Smartphone-Connected Door Lock’, is no exception.

HackerHouse Raspberry Pi Door Lock

Using a Raspberry Pi-powered deadbolt actuator, multiple users can remotely unlock a door via a smartphone app.

The build can be attached to your existing lock, so there’s no need to start pulling out the inner workings of your door.

Hacker House Raspberry Pi Door Lock

The app will also notify you when the door has been unlocked, offering added peace of mind when you’re away from home.

For a full run-through, check out their video below.

How to Make a Smartphone Connected Door Lock

In this video, we show you how to make a smartphone-controlled, internet-connected deadbolt actuator powered by a Raspberry Pi that can be added onto your existing door lock without any modifications to the door. The door lock can be controlled by multiple smartphones, and even notify you whenever someone locks/unlocks the door.

You’ll need access to a 3D printer for some of the parts and, as a way to support their growing channel, the team provide printed parts for sale on eBay.

You may also wish to check out their other Raspberry Pi projects too. They’ve made a lot of cool things, including a Facebook Chatbot, a Portable Arcade Console, a Smart Mirror, and a Motion-tracking Nerf Turret.

How to Make a Raspberry Pi Motion Tracking Airsoft / Nerf Turret

In this video we show you how to build a DIY motion tracking airsoft (or nerf gun) turret with a raspberry pi 3. The airsoft turret is autonomous so it moves and fires the gun when it detects motion. There is also an interactive mode so that you can control it manually from your keyboard.

And in celebration of hitting 50k subscribers, the team are giving away two Raspberry Pis! Just subscribe to their channel and tell them how you would use one in your own project to be in with a chance of winning.

If you have built your own Raspberry Pi-powered lock or security system, we’d love to see it. So go ahead and share it in the comments below, or post it across social media, remembering to tag us in the process.

The post Hacker House Smartphone-Connected Door Lock appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Build an automatic cat treat dispenser with Hummingbird

via Arduino Blog

cattreat01

The Hummingbird by BirdBrain Technologies is an Arduino AtHeart microcontroller designed to enable beginners to create robots from craft materials. Hummingbird kits include LEDs, motors, and sensors that connect directly to the board. This eliminates the need for soldering or breadboarding and ensures that users have the parts they need to build their first robots. All of the components are reusable, so the same kit can be used to build many different robots.

In addition, the Hummingbird supports a variety of programming options, making it appropriate for beginning programmers as well as those who are more advanced. Some programming languages, such as Scratch and Snap!, can only be used when the board is connected to the computer. We will concentrate here on programming alternatives that enable users to upload a program onto the board’s Arduino.

Classrooms all over the world have used the Hummingbird from elementary to high school for projects ranging from Shakespeare dioramas to the physics of amusement park rides. In the following project, the BirdBrain Technologies team will show how they used the Hummingbird to build an automatic cat treat dispenser and demonstrate how the Hummingbird can be utilized to construct robots from everyday materials.

Building with the Hummingbird
Beginners can easily get started building Hummingbird robots with cardboard and craft materials. Motors, sensors, and LEDs can be connected directly to the Hummingbird board, and these elements can be added to the robot with hot glue. Hot glue peels off the components so that they can later be reused.

The example project uses one servo motor, one single color LED, and a light sensor. The dispenser consists of a servo motor attached to craft sticks that block the bottom of a chute containing cat treats. The position of the servo motor can be changed in software to release treats.

To receive a treat, the cat must cover a light sensor in front of the chute. When the cat covers the sensor, the servo motor briefly moves to open the chute and dispense a treat. The LED was included to show our test cat the location of the light sensor.

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Programming with the Hummingbird
One unique feature of the Hummingbird is that it supports three different programming options for producing an Arduino program. These options provide steps of increasing difficulty to support learners as they transition from programming novices to Arduino experts.

Beginners can start with the CREATE Lab Visual Programmer. This software option is based on storyboarding. Users can select the motors and LEDs that they are using on a schematic of the Hummingbird board. Then they can create expressions by using sliders to set the values of these outputs. The expression below sets a servo motor to 100°.

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Expressions can be combined to create sequences. For example, the sequence below controls our automatic cat treat dispenser. This sequence is controlled by a sensor block. If the light level is low, the three expressions on the left are executed. If the light level is high, the three expressions on the right are executed. The user can then convert this sequence to an Arduino program by simply clicking the “Export Sequence” button (shown outlined in red). The Hummingbird can then be placed into Arduino mode and the program uploaded to the microcontroller.

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Another option for beginners is ArduBlock, which provides a visual introduction to the Arduino language. The Hummingbird extension for ArduBlock includes a block for each Hummingbird component. A program in ArduBlock to control the treat dispenser is shown below. This program is equivalent to the CREATE Lab Visual Programmer sequence shown above.

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The Arduino code generated by this ArduBlock program is shown below. Individuals moving from the CREATE Lab Visual Programmer or ArduBlock to Arduino can start by modifying the generated code. For example, in the video we modified the commands inside the else to make the LED blink to attract the cat’s attention.

cattreat06

Once individuals are comfortable with the Arduino programming language, they can create more complex programs in Arduino. For instance, the video shows how we modified our robot and our code to incorporate three lights and three sensors. To get a treat, the cat must cover the sensor when the corresponding light is on.

The cat treat dispenser is only one example of a Hummingbird robot using the power of the Arduino at its core. The parts can be used and reused to construct an unlimited number of robots with low-cost materials such as cardboard, pipe cleaners, recycled materials, and even paper mache!