Tag Archives: tutorials

How to configure I2C sensors with Arduino

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sensorpan-600

Edward Mallon writes:

I’ve spent the last year in the ‘uncanny valley’ of the Arduino. That’s the point where you understand the tutorials at Arduino.cc, but still don’t get much from the material on gitHub because trained programmers would never stoop to using the wire.h library when they could just roll their own in native C++ using the avr-g++ compiler.  The problem with establishing sensor communication at the level of the TWI peripheral inside the AVR is that there are so many fiddling details to keep track of that it quickly overruns the 7±2 things this average human can hold in his head at one time: Computers aren’t the only things that crash after a buffer overflow!  So this post is meant to be a chunking exercise for beginner-intermediate level people like myself who want to get a new sensor working using the standard IDE.  I’ve tried to distill it all down to things that I run into frequently, but there’s still a lot of material here:  So pour yourself a cuppa before diving in…

More details at Arduino based underwater sensors blog.

ESP8266 Deep Sleep with Arduino IDE

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Deep-sleep-blog-1280-600

Rui Santos has written a great guide shows us what’s Deep Sleep and how to use it with the ESP8266 in the Arduino IDE.

With most of the ESP8266 modules, you can’t change the hardware to save power, but you can write software to do it. If you use the sleep functions with the ESP8266, it will draw less power and your batteries will last longer. In this guide, we’re going to talk about Deep Sleep with the ESP8266.

See the full post on his blog, Random Nerd Tutorials.

Check out the video after the break.

Pulse Oximeter functionality for a medical device

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Pulse Oximeter on my finger-600

Alexander Lang writes:

The gentlemen for whom I’m developing this hardware for has requested some additional functionality. The additional functionality requested is a Pulse Oximetry measurement.  Pulse Oximetry is the measurement of a person’s pulse along with how much oxygen is present within their blood.  It is a common measurement made by medical practitioners to ensure their patients are in good health.  I suspect for the medical device, this information will be correlated with a person’s breathing to assess how well a person’s lungs are working and how much oxygen from the air is getting into their blood.

See the full post on his blog here.

How to build your own RS232 to TTL converter

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A how-to on making a DIY RS232 to TTL converter by Jestine Yong:

As I read many pages on the internet I saw there is a sort of adapter so called “USB to TTL adapter” who can communicate through with the uC. I had not the time to order one but I give a try to make one for the COM port. Actually it is an RS232 to TTL converter which I found better from my opinion than that USB to TTL adapter.
Here is why I like more this RS232 to TTL adapter than the other one:

  • can be used on a real RS232 port
  • it is a stable voltage level converter
  • can be used on USB port too (through USB to RS232 converter)
  • there is no VCC ( somebody would say it’s a disadvantage but wait…) *
  • it is a real hardware stuff, no emulation etc. (if it is used through a real com port)
  • can be built really cheap and easy

More details at Electronics Repair site.

Extend Eagle CAD tool with ULPs: Writing your first User language program

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Eagle

Yahya Tawil posted a detailed how-to on writing ULP’s for Eagle CAD:

In this tutorial, you will learn how to write your first ULP in Eagle CAD to add a new capability to your CAD tool.
User Language Program (ULP) is a set of extensions for Eagle CAD users to either facilitate a routine job in an automated way or do a job that can’t be done without a ULP’s help. For example, the only way to import an image to your PCB design is by using the command import-bmp ULP. Auto-placement, exporting BOM, and renumbering parts in a schematic are all routine jobs with which ULP can help.

More details at allaboutcircuits.com.

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