Tag Archives: tutorials

Pulse Oximeter functionality for a medical device

via Dangerous Prototypes

Pulse Oximeter on my finger-600

Alexander Lang writes:

The gentlemen for whom I’m developing this hardware for has requested some additional functionality. The additional functionality requested is a Pulse Oximetry measurement.  Pulse Oximetry is the measurement of a person’s pulse along with how much oxygen is present within their blood.  It is a common measurement made by medical practitioners to ensure their patients are in good health.  I suspect for the medical device, this information will be correlated with a person’s breathing to assess how well a person’s lungs are working and how much oxygen from the air is getting into their blood.

See the full post on his blog here.

How to build your own RS232 to TTL converter

via Dangerous Prototypes

pix4

A how-to on making a DIY RS232 to TTL converter by Jestine Yong:

As I read many pages on the internet I saw there is a sort of adapter so called “USB to TTL adapter” who can communicate through with the uC. I had not the time to order one but I give a try to make one for the COM port. Actually it is an RS232 to TTL converter which I found better from my opinion than that USB to TTL adapter.
Here is why I like more this RS232 to TTL adapter than the other one:

  • can be used on a real RS232 port
  • it is a stable voltage level converter
  • can be used on USB port too (through USB to RS232 converter)
  • there is no VCC ( somebody would say it’s a disadvantage but wait…) *
  • it is a real hardware stuff, no emulation etc. (if it is used through a real com port)
  • can be built really cheap and easy

More details at Electronics Repair site.

Extend Eagle CAD tool with ULPs: Writing your first User language program

via Dangerous Prototypes

Eagle

Yahya Tawil posted a detailed how-to on writing ULP’s for Eagle CAD:

In this tutorial, you will learn how to write your first ULP in Eagle CAD to add a new capability to your CAD tool.
User Language Program (ULP) is a set of extensions for Eagle CAD users to either facilitate a routine job in an automated way or do a job that can’t be done without a ULP’s help. For example, the only way to import an image to your PCB design is by using the command import-bmp ULP. Auto-placement, exporting BOM, and renumbering parts in a schematic are all routine jobs with which ULP can help.

More details at allaboutcircuits.com.

Via the contact form.

Panelization – using GerberPanelizer on Windows (Linux possible)

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Arsenijs over at Hackaday.io writes:

This tutorial was done on Windows. Authors claim it could also be used on Linux by using Mono, but I haven’t tried and don’t understand a lot about Mono to see what could be done. I am switching to Linux nowadays, so I’d be very grateful to anybody that’d make instructions on how to launch it, however – and I’m sure other fellow Linux-wielding engineers will be grateful, too =)
This is the GitHub issue describing steps to launch it on Linux, half-successfully (thanks to @jlbrian7 for figuring this out

More details at Hackaday.io project page.

Thanks Scrubis! Via the contact form.

MCUXpresso IDE tutorial series

via Dangerous Prototypes

blinky-on-lpc800-dip

Erich Styger has made a series of tutorial blog posts on using the new NXP MCUXpresso IDE.

Published so far are:

  • MCUXpresso IDE: Unified Eclipse IDE for NXPs ARM Cortex-M Microcontrollers
  • MCUXpresso IDE: S-Record, Intel Hex and Binary Files
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Adding the Eclipse Marketplace Client
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Importing Kinetis Design Studio Projects
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Installing Processor Expert into Eclipse Neon
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Terminate and Disconnect a Debug Session
  • MCUXpresso IDE: Blinky the NXP LPC800-DIP Board

More details at mcuoneclipse.com.

Build your very own drink mixing robot

via Dangerous Prototypes

Yu Jiang Tham designed and built his own bartender robot named Bar Mixvah, that is available on Github:

I built a robot that mixes drinks named Bar Mixvah.  It utilizes an Arduino microcontroller switching a series of pumps via transistors on the physical layer, and the MEAN stack (MongoDB, Express.js, Angular.js, Node.js) and jQuery for the frontend and backend.  In this post, I’ll teach you how I made it.  You can follow along and build one just like it!

Check out Yu Jiang’s 3-part blog post here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3.