Tag Archives: Video

Harry Potter and the Real-Life Daily Prophet

via Raspberry Pi

Most people would visit The Wizarding World of Harry Potter and bring back a few souvenirs to adorn their shelves. But for Piet Rullens Jr, with a video from his trip to hand, that simply wasn’t enough.

Daily Prophet poster with moving object

Daily Prophet with moving object

Taking to Photoshop, Piet designed a copy of the Daily Prophet, the newspaper from the original book and film series, and included an article about his trip to the Harry Potter theme park.

Within the design I marked an area with the exact size of the Raspberry Pi screen. Next, I plotted the poster on normal paper at 100%, so the marked area still matched the Raspberry Pi screen.

From there, Piet used the design to mark the backing board of a poster frame, allowing him to cut out a hole the size of the 7″ display.

Piet Rullens Harry Potter Poster

The display sits firmly between the lip of the screen and the glass of the frame, secured to the back of the board alongside a Raspberry Pi 3.

Piet Rullens Harry Potter Poster

As the wall behind the poster backs onto a cupboard, Piet was able to drill a small hole for the USB power lead, leaving no unsightly wiring on display after the frame was hung.

Piet Rullens Harry Potter Poster

As for the software?

The software is very simple: I use a small Python script and an Adafruit IR distance sensor to detect if somebody is approaching the poster. If that’s the case, with a simple command I turn on the Raspberry Pi screen and start a H264 movie using Omxplayer. The movie will play for 5 minutes and then I stop the movie and turn off the screen, so it’s not playing 24/7; this saves energy and screen lifetime.

We love this project, in that ‘Oh it’s amazing, but why didn’t I think of this first?’ way that every good maker feels when they see something awesome.

The post Harry Potter and the Real-Life Daily Prophet appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Improve your programming skills with an oscilloscope

via Arduino Blog

Oscillo-02

Starting a new project is always a fun yet effective way to hone your skills while exploring circuitry and programming. To help improve his engineering chops, Joop Brokking recently bought an inexpensive oscilloscope (a device for visualizing voltage over time in an x-y graph) and connected it to an Arduino Uno. He then shared his findings in a detailed tutorial on YouTube.

In the video below, Brokking is using a Hantek 6022BE 20MHz dual-channel oscilloscope and provides three examples to better understand what can go wrong when building a simple Arduino setup.

Shining Back liveset blows your mind with light and sound

via Arduino Blog

angle

Last year, we featured an awesome audiovisual project from ANGLE that applied videomapping techniques to their livesets. Now, the Florence-based duo is back with their latest A/V system, “Shining Back,” which was designed in collaboration with JoinT Studio’s Stefano Bonifazi.

Essentially, it’s a grid structure consisting of LED lights that pulse in a geometric matrix to the duo’s live rhythms. The installation runs on an Arduino Uno and uses Mad Mapper and Modul8 software.

The immersive atmosphere created by the music is emphasized by a new research in the visual realm. Taking an architectural form of a kaleidoscope the lighting visually weaves and refracts the music into a surreal yet symbiotic form.

Teach your drone what is up and down with an Arduino

via Arduino Blog

Gyroscopes and accelerometers are the primary sensors at the heart of an IMU, also known as an internal measurement unit — an electronic sensor device that measures the orientation, gravitational forces and velocity of a multicopter, and help you keep it in the air using Arduino.

Two videos made by Joop Brokking, a Maker with passion for RC model ‘copters, clearly explain how to program your own IMU so that it can be used for self-balancing your drone without Kalman filters,  libraries, or complex calculations.

Auto leveling a multicopter is pretty challenging. It means that when you release the pitch and roll controls on your transmitter the multicopter levels itself. To get this to work the flight controller of the multicopter needs to know exactly which way is down. Like a spirit level that is on top of the multicopter for the pitch and roll axis.

Very often people ask me how to make an auto level feature for their multicopter. The answer to a question like this is pretty involved and cannot be explained in one email. And that is why I made this video series.

You can find the bill of materials and code here.

Holopainting with Raspberry Pi

via Raspberry Pi

We’ve covered 2D light-painting here before. This project takes things a step further: meet 3D holopainting.

Holo_Painting-1

This project’s an unholy mixture of stop-motion, light-painting and hyperlapse from FilmSpektakel, a time-lapse and film production company in Vienna. It was made as part of a university graduation project. (With Raspberry Pis and Raspberry Pi camera boards, natch.)

Getting this footage out was a very labour-intensive process – but the results are stupendous. The subject was filmed by a ring of 24 networked Raspberry Pi cameras working like a 3d scanner, taking pictures around the ring with a delay of 83 milliseconds between each one so that movement could be captured.

Holopainting rig

 

They then cut out all of the resulting images – told you it was labour-intensive – and put them on a black background, then fed that data into a commercial light-painting stick. (If you don’t want to fork out a ton of cash for your own light-painting stick, there are instructions on building one with a Raspberry Pi over at Adafruit.)

A man dressed as a budget ninja walked the stick in front of a series of cameras set up where the original Raspberry Pi cameras had been, to create 3D images hanging in the air.

holopainting ninja

Presto: a holopainting – and the results are tremendous. Here’s a making-of video.

The Invention of #HoloPainting

Holopainting is a combination of the Light Painting, Stop Motion and Hyperlapse technique to create three dimensional light paintings. We didn’t want to use computer generated images, so we built a giant 3D scanner out of 24 Raspberry Pis with their webcams. These cameras took photos from 24 different perspectives of the person in the middle with a delay of 83 milliseconds, so the movement of the person also was recorded.

There’s a comment that often pops up when we describe a project like this: why bother? We’ll head that off right now: because you can. Because nobody’s done it before. Because the end results look phenomenal. We love it, and we’d love to see more projects like this!

The post Holopainting with Raspberry Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.