Tag Archives: wireless

EasyESP-1: a rapid prototyping and development board for ESP8266

via Dangerous Prototypes

pics-EasyESP_Features-600

Raj over at Embedded Lab has designed a development board for ESP8266:

EasyESP-1 is a rapid prototyping board for the low-cost, WiFi-enabled ESP8266 microcontroller. With an onboard USB-to-Serial converter pre-installed, EasyESP-1 does not require any additional hardware to download your application firmware to the ESP8266 chip. The ESP module used in this development board is ESP-12E. All the I/O pins are broken out to 0.1” female headers for easy access, as well as to standard Grove connectors for connecting Grove sensors and other compatible modules. The 180-point breadboard further facilitates experimenting and testing of external circuits.

List of features

  • Easy access to all GPIO pin through female headers and Grove connectors
  • On-board USB-UART chip for easy programming and debugging
  • 180-point breadboard for experimenting with test circuits
  • On-board 3.3V (800 mA) regulated power supply
  • Two tact switches for user inputs, and one output LED
  • Slide switch to enable/disable auto Wake Up feature during Sleep mode

Full details at Embedded Lab blog. It’s also up on Tindie.

DIY IKEA wireless Qi charging for the Hexiwear

via Dangerous Prototypes

wireless-qi-charging-the-hexiwear

Erich Styger built a DIY a wireless charging system for the Hexiwear:

The Achilles Heel of the Mikroelektronika Hexiwear is its charging: the charging and USB connector are only designed for a limited number of plug-unplug cycles, and it does not have a wireless charging capability like the Apple iWatch. Until now! I have built a DIY wireless charging system for the Hexiwear🙂

More details at MCU on Eclipse homepage.

Homebrew WiFi shield

via Dangerous Prototypes

pics-Banner-600

m0xpd has published a new build, the homebrew WiFi shield:

Having just finished development of the new m0xpd / Kanga ESP8266 – AD9834 board, I find myself with a few WiFi components knocking about on the bench – so I figured it would be fun to try to make a WiFi shield for an Arduino…
Using an ESP8266 (in a module, such as an ESP-12) as a WiFi shield for an Arduino is a little like using the proverbial ‘steam hammer to crack a nut’ – but these modules are frighteningly cheap and I do want a WiFi shield (which are surprisingly expensive).
I have a spare ESP-12 module on a nice breakout board with 0.1 inch pitch headers, just crying out to be used once again (it having done service in the early stages of the development of the connected beacon etc)

More info at m0xpd’s blog.

Homebrew WiFi shield

via Dangerous Prototypes

pics-Banner-600

m0xpd has published a new build, the homebrew WiFi shield:

Having just finished development of the new m0xpd / Kanga ESP8266 – AD9834 board, I find myself with a few WiFi components knocking about on the bench – so I figured it would be fun to try to make a WiFi shield for an Arduino…
Using an ESP8266 (in a module, such as an ESP-12) as a WiFi shield for an Arduino is a little like using the proverbial ‘steam hammer to crack a nut’ – but these modules are frighteningly cheap and I do want a WiFi shield (which are surprisingly expensive).
I have a spare ESP-12 module on a nice breakout board with 0.1 inch pitch headers, just crying out to be used once again (it having done service in the early stages of the development of the connected beacon etc)

More info at m0xpd’s blog.

[CNLohr] Reverses Vive, Valve Engineers Play Along

via hardware – Hackaday

[CNLohr] needs no introduction around these parts. He’s pulled off a few really epic hacks. Recently, he’s set his sights on writing a simple, easy to extend library to work with the HTC Vive VR controller equipment, and in particular the Watchman controller.

There’s been a lot of previous work on the device, so [Charles] wasn’t starting from scratch, and he live-streamed his work, allowing others to play along. In the end, [Alan Yates] and [Ben Jackson] stopped by and gave some oblique hints and “warmer-cooler” guidance. A much-condensed version is up on YouTube (and embedded below). In the links, you’ll find code and the live streams in their original glory, if you want to see what went down blow by blow. Code and more docs are in this Gist.

reverse-engineering-the-htc-vive-ohjkpnakswmmkv-shot0001In the end, it all ended up being a lot of hard work because the Watchman controller needs to send its orientation and accelerometer data wirelessly, and this means compressing a lot of data down into a tiny trickle. All possible tricks were used, including variable-length fields where one bit indicates whether the next byte still belongs to this sample or the next, and packing the data into a frame from both ends. We see why figuring out the protocol drove [Charles] nuts! His dissection begins ten minutes into the summary video.

Besides the hints, the community involvement, and sheer persistence, [Charles] was also helped by being able to generate his own data. Instead of relying on the placement of the device in space, an AVR blinked IR LEDs into the controller to generate known timing deltas. Remember this general technique if you’re reverse engineering anything.

We think the Vive is very cool, and we’ve covered hacks into it before. From [Trammell Hudson]’s early hacks to this recent jaw-dropping drone orientation demo, hackers have been figuring out how to use the Lighthouses on their own. Now [CNLohr] (and the community) have decoded one of the last remaining parts of the OEM hardware. Woot!


Filed under: hardware, Virtual Reality

HC-12 433MHz wireless serial communication module configuration

via Dangerous Prototypes

pic-HC-12-433MHz-wireless-module-600

Dziku  writes:

HC-12 are cheap 433MHz wireless serial port communication modules with a range up to 1800m in open space. Each costs about $5 when bought from China, and 2 of them can create wireless UART link that can be used, for example, to transfer telemetry data from UAV. Or drive IoT device. Or connect sensors. Or whatever else one can think of.
It is based on SI4463 RF chip, has build in microcontroller, can be configured using AT commands and allows to use external antenna. Working frequency is divided into 100 channels starting from 433,4MHz up to 473,0MHz with 400kHz channel separation. Maximum output power is 100mW (20dBm) and receiver sensitivity differs from -117dBm to -100dBm, depending on transmission speed. It accepts 3,2V-5,5V power supply and can be used with 3.3V and 5V UART voltage devices (3.3V safe).

More details at Quad Me Up site.