Tag Archives: wireless

Soldering iron + Nodemcu = IoT device

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Vegard Paulsen blogged about his soldering-iron #IoT project:

My trusty old soldering-iron recently got an upgrade!
With the help of a NodeMCU. a RGB-LED it now reports the set temperature to the #IoT Thingspeak.com server through WIFI.
It also sends me Prowl messages on my Iphone when I forget to turn it off.
It all started when I needed to fix the display on the Soldering-iron itself after some guys at the soldering-iron factory forgot to mount the segment display properly.
The road to IoT is anything but streamlined yet. The NodeMCU & Arduino IDE integration is in it early stages and the tutorials out there are few and full of frustation.

How to control your ESP8266 from anywhere in the world

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Rui Santos shared a tutorial on how to control your ESP8266 from anywhere in the world:

The most common questions I get about the ESP8266 WiFi Modules are: “Is it possible to control my ESP8266 from anywhere in the world?” and “How can I control my ESP8266 from anywhere?”.
I’m happy to announce today that I have a solution for that problem.
With the new version of Home Automation Server you can add an ESP8266 to your dashboard and control your ESP8266 GPIOs from anywhere in less than 5 minutes!

More details at Rui’s Random Nerd tutorials site.

Check out the video after the break.

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MQTT/JQUERY/WebSockets controller

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Peter Scargill writes:

I wrote a while ago about using web sockets as against something like NETIO for controlling the home – most folk liked the article but I think part of it was a little complicated – and at the time I’d not really thought it out to make it as simple as possible.
So, this morning I started again and now I have a decent and easy way to make control interfaces from the mobile phone – to ESP boards. I won’t go into MQTT in detail here – I’ll assume you have an MQTT interface of some description on your WIFI boards – if you need more info on that, look elsewhere on the blog.

ESP8266 Arduino NetIO Server demo

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Peter Scargill writes:

This week as regular readers know I was far away from our little home in Spain – in fact I was at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)  in Boston, helping promote ESP8266 technology (why? because I could).
Along the way I met up with Ivan Grokhotkov who as some of you know has done a lot of work to bring the Arduino environment to the ESP8266 community.  As part of what we were doing at MIT, Ivan and I decided to put together a simple demonstration – this would use NETIO (my favourite IOS/Android visual interface) and ESP8266-Arduino to help an ESP board drive a servo via wireless control.

Details at Peter’s blog.

WiFi smoke detector

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An instructables on how to make a WiFi smoke detector by Proto G:

This is a simple WiFI Smoke Detector that texts me when it senses smoke. I made this for my battery storage area in case of a lithium polymer fire. I still have all of my regular smoke detectors installed and I don’t suggest relying only on this, but rather as an extra layer of protection. If I had a house I would install a proper fire alarm system that calls the fire department, but I live in a small apartment so I can’t. I can set this one to email and call the local fire department as well(local laws apply). In my county it is allowed as long as you register it with the fire department. Either way, I would rather call the fire department myself when I receive multiple texts.

Check out the video after the break.

ESP8266 MQTT battery monitor project

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Steve’s latest DirtyPCBs project, a wireless MQTT battery monitor:

This board uses an ESP8266 (ESP12), a Texas Instruments INA226 I2C voltage and current monitor, and a Texas Instruments LMR12010X buck converter. This board is designed to wirelessly monitor 12 volt batteries and power supplies using an external current shunt resistor. The voltage across the shunt resistor is measured differentially. The shunt resistor value and current rating is programmable in the firmware.

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