Tag Archives: wireless

Bridge monitoring system using wireless sensor network

via Dangerous Prototypes

pics-LabVIEW

Zx Lee and his friends built the bridge monitoring system using wireless sensor network, that is available at github:

Recently, I completed a mini project together with two of my friends. So I am going to take this opportunity to share the project that we have made, we named it the Bridge Monitoring System (BMS) using Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). We are required to design an embedded system that is related with disaster management, either mitigation, preparedness, response or rehabilitation. To give you a high level overview of this project, basically we created three sensor nodes that acquire sensor measurement and transmit to central hub through wireless network. The sensor network works in a many-to-one fashion and data processing is done on the central hub. All the sensor measurement from each node is also displayed on the Host PC for user interface. Therefore, in this article, I am going to walk through some details of the project and how it works.

Project info at Zx Lee’s blog.

Magic Mote MSP430G2553 wireless sensor node with NRF24L01+ module

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Tom from Magic Smoke writes:

This is my first time designing a PCB for MSP430. I really like the NRF24L01+ booster pack but I would like something smaller to use for remote temperature sensors. With that in mind I’ve designed a 24.5 x 50 mm PCB (2 on a 5×5 cm prototype) featuring MSP430G2553 and an adapter for a 8-pin NRF24L01+ module using essentially the same pinout, with the intention of using the Spirilis library. There’s a jack socket to connect a 1-wire sensor (e.g. DS18B20), a 4-pin header to connect a temperature/humidity sensor (SHT22 or similar), a programming header that gives serial access, and 3 other general purpose I/O pins.

More details at Magic Smoke blog.

A Solar-Powered Headset From Recycled Parts

via hardware – Hackaday

Solar power has surged ahead in recent years, and access for the individual has grown accordingly. Not waiting around for a commercial alternative, Instructables user [taifur] has gone ahead and built himself a solar-powered Bluetooth headset.

Made almost completely of recycled components — reducing e-waste helps us all — only the 1 W flexible solar panel, voltage regulator, and the RN-52 Bluetooth module were purchased for this project. The base of the headset has been converted from [taifur]’s old wired one, meanwhile a salvaged boost converter, and charge controller — for a lithium-ion battery — form the power circuit. An Apple button makes an appearance alongside a control panel for a portable DVD player (of all things), and an MP4 player’s battery. Some careful recovery and reconfiguration work done, reassembly with a little assistance from the handyman’s secret weapon — duct tape — and gobs of hot glue bore a wireless fruit ready to receive the sun’s bounty.

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Taking the initiative to go green using solar power– taken literally — could also result in getting into hydroponic gardening.


Filed under: hardware, how-to, portable audio hacks, solar hacks

EasyESP-1: a rapid prototyping and development board for ESP8266

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Raj over at Embedded Lab has designed a development board for ESP8266:

EasyESP-1 is a rapid prototyping board for the low-cost, WiFi-enabled ESP8266 microcontroller. With an onboard USB-to-Serial converter pre-installed, EasyESP-1 does not require any additional hardware to download your application firmware to the ESP8266 chip. The ESP module used in this development board is ESP-12E. All the I/O pins are broken out to 0.1” female headers for easy access, as well as to standard Grove connectors for connecting Grove sensors and other compatible modules. The 180-point breadboard further facilitates experimenting and testing of external circuits.

List of features

  • Easy access to all GPIO pin through female headers and Grove connectors
  • On-board USB-UART chip for easy programming and debugging
  • 180-point breadboard for experimenting with test circuits
  • On-board 3.3V (800 mA) regulated power supply
  • Two tact switches for user inputs, and one output LED
  • Slide switch to enable/disable auto Wake Up feature during Sleep mode

Full details at Embedded Lab blog. It’s also up on Tindie.