Tag Archives: wireless

ESP8266 MQTT client on RTOS

via Dangerous Prototypes


Baoshi wrote a MQTT client for Espressif’s RTOS SDK:

If you search MQTT and ESP8266 on the intraweb, most likely all hits can be traced back to the great work done by TuanPM. However Tuan’s code is based on Espressif’s NON-OS SDK. There has been some great debates about embedded programming with-or-without an OS. To me programming with OS vs NON-OS is like programming with C vs Assembly. I like programming in C, so I wrote a new MQTT client for Espressif’s RTOS SDK.

The source code is available at Github.

Spectrum analysis with RFM12B

via Dangerous Prototypes


Martin Harizanov writes, “The comments to my last blog post got me thinking if I had chosen the right RFM channel at home, obviously if the channel is noisy that directly affects reception and increases the error rates. I use the default 868Mhz setting for the RFM12B/RFM69s at home and decided to check if the channel is clear from other transmissions. I remembered seeing a RFM12B spectrum analyzer project over at Jeelab some years ago, and 5 minutes later was running the spectrum analyzer using one of my Funky v3s equipped with a 868Mhz RFM12B.”

More details at Martin’s blog.

DIY WiFi gas detector with text alerts

via Dangerous Prototypes


Stefan over at Hackster.io has written an article detailing his DIY Wi-Fi gas detector that sends SMS alerts:

Hey guys, back with another little project that I’ve been fiddling with for the past week. With kids around, every parent is thinking how to make their home safer for the little ones and for everybody in general. One of the most dangerous thing in the house can be the stove and since we have a gas-powered one, I always wondered why there are no simple gas detectors that can be used around the stove, just to alert instantly that gas may be leaking.
Well, that was the moment when I decided to build one of my own. Having a Particle (Spark) Photon lying around, I decided to use that as a foundation for the project. I like the fact that they are very small and cheap, and also can be flashed over the Wi-Fi. Having that settled, I needed the gas sensor and some kind of alerting system.

Project details at Hackster.io.

Arduino WiFi Shield 101 is now available in the US store!

via Arduino Blog


We are excited to announce Arduino Wifi Shield 101 developed with Atmel is now available for purchase on the Arduino Store US (49.90$).

Arduino WiFi Shield 101 is a powerful IoT shield with crypto-authentication that connects your Arduino or Genuino board to the internet wirelessly. Connecting it to a WiFi network is simple, no further configuration in addition to the SSID and the password are required. The WiFI library allows you to write sketches which connect to the internet using the shield.

The shield is based on the Atmel SmartConnect-WINC1500 module, compliant with the IEEE 802.11 b/g/n standard. The WINC1500 module provided is a network controller capable of both TCP and UDP protocols.  The main feature is an hardware encryption/decryption security protocol provided by the ATECC508A CryptoAuthentication chip that is an ultra secure method to provide key agreement for encryption/decryption, specifically designed for the IoT market.

Last year, Massimo Banzi introduced the shield:

“In this increasingly connected world, the Arduino Wi-Fi Shield 101 will help drive more inventions in the IoT market. Expanding our portfolio of Arduino extensions, this new shield can flawlessly connect to any modern Arduino board giving our community more options for connectivity, along with added security elements to their creative projects.”

The WiFi Shield 101 is the first Arduino product fully supporting SSL and all the communication between your board and our secured server. With the power of the Arduino Zero and the WiFi Shield 101 it is possible to make secure IoT applications simply and just using the Arduino Language.

A working example and instructions on how to get started are available on Arduino Cloud, a work-in-progress project that gives you access to a pre-configured MQTT server for your IoT sketches using only your Arduino account. More examples and features will be available in the next months.

Feel like knowing more about the shield? Explore the  Getting Started guide.

nodeLHC – ESP8266 development board

via Dangerous Prototypes


Pedro Minatel shared us his ESP8266 development board project – nodeLHC:

This board was developed at the Campinas Hacker Lab in Brazil during our weekly IoT meetings. This layout and schematic was developed by Leandro Pereira.
The idea was to develop a easy to use board and to learn how to use this magnificent WiFi module.
We are not selling it but you can build your own board if you want!!!
This board is full compatible with nodeMCU, Arduino IDE, native development and any other firmware avaliable.

Project details at Pedro’s Sistemas Embarcados site and Hackaday.io

Via the contact form.

ESP8266 LED display

via Dangerous Prototypes


Evan writes:

This is my proof-of-concept for using mqtt with the esp8266.  I saw this LED display sitting around and I couldn’t imagine why no one was using it, the answer was no one knew how to talk to it.  Easy, I think.  Looking at the board it’s just an 8031, a serial level shifter, and a bunch of display-centric parts.  The pile of capacitors around the max232 equivalent was the give-away.  capacitors external to the chip are needed in the voltage boosting/negative voltage generation circuits for rs232 levels (until recently, I hear someone put them on-die).  Tracing those signals is easy and I found they went to UART pins on the 8031.

Details at Evan’s Techie-blog.