Tag Archives: XBee

Control a robot through hand gestures with Arduino Uno and Xbee

via Arduino Blog

handgesture-robot.jpg

Robin Andersson shared with us the link to his Instructable to create a robot controlled by (gloved) hand gestures and running on a couple of Arduino Unos and Xbee.

You can make it yourself following the 8 steps of the tutorial and then customize the gestures as you like.

Enjoy the video below:

Using Ultrasonic Sensors to Measure and Log Oil Tank Levels

via Hack a Day» hardware

[Mike] lives in a temperate rainforest in Alaska (we figured from his website’s name) and uses a 570 gallon oil tank to supply his furnace. Until now, he had no way of knowing how much oil was left in the tank and what his daily usage was. As he didn’t find any commercial product that could do what he wanted, he designed his own solution. In his write-up, [Mike] started by listing all the different sensors he had considered to measure the oil level and finally opted for an ultrasonic sensor. In his opinion, this kind of sensor is the best compromise between cost, ease of use, range and precision for his application. The precise chosen model was the ping))) bought from our favorite auction website for around $2.5.

[Mike] built the custom enclosure that you can see in the picture above using PVC parts. Enclosed are the ultrasonic sensor, a temperature sensor and an LED indicating the power status. On the other side of the CAT5 cable can be found an Arduino compatible board with an XBee shield and a 9V battery. Using another XBee shield and its USB adapter board, [Mike] can now wirelessly access the tank oil level log from his computer.


Filed under: hardware, home hacks

A Low-Cost Modular High Altitude Balloon Tracker with Mesh Networked Sensors

via Hack a Day» hardware

[Ethan] just tipped us about a project he and a few colleagues worked on last year for their senior design project. It’s a low-cost open hardware/software high altitude balloon tracker with sensors that form a mesh network with a master node. The latter (shown above) includes an ATmega644, an onboard GPS module (NEO-6M), a micro SD card slot, a 300mW APRS (144.39MHz) transmitter and finally headers to plug an XBee radio. This platform is therefore in charge of getting wireless data from the slave platforms, storing it in the uSD card while transmitting the balloon position via APRS along with other data. It’s interesting to note that to keep the design low-cost, they chose a relatively cheap analog radio module ($~40) and hacked together AFSK modulation of their output signal with hardware PWM outputs and a sine-wave lookup table.

The slave nodes are composed of ‘slave motherboards’ on which can be plugged several daughter-boards: geiger counters, atmospheric sensors, camera control/accelerometer boards. If you want to build your own system, be sure to check out this page which includes all the necessary instructions and resources.


Filed under: gps hacks, hardware, wireless hacks

A DIY magnetic levitation vehicle to inspire future engineers

via Arduino Blog

DIY maglev

Next to our Arduino booth at Makerfaire Bay Area we had a cool project created by Antipodes, a girls robotics team headquartered in Pacifica, California, USA. It’s a Do It Yourself (DIY) remote controlled (RC) model maglev with electromagnetic propulsion, or shortly called maglev.

A maglev is just like a conventional train but instead of wheels it has magnets and it levitates!

The team did a great job not only for the results achieved but especially in sharing the project’s documentation, detailed with all the steps for the construction through videos and pictures so that others can more easily follow in their footsteps.

DIY maglev

 

The maglev, which won the Maker Faire Editor’s Choice blue ribbon,  contains Arduino UNO, Arduino  Wireless Protoshield, plus many other components you can explore in their videos below and in the project page.

 

Chat with Xbee for Arduino

via Arduino Blog

 

Thank you [priyansmurarka] to send us this project involving Xbee. This module is fully compatible with Arduino Boards and you can connect it with a proper shield, the [WirelessShield] . With that you can make comunicate Arduinos wireless, including sending messages about status or whatever you want. The submission of today is about building up a simple chat system.

It is a simple peer to peer chat system made using XBee radios which are compatible with Arduino .

On the [blog] of [priyansmurarka] you can find all the step to configure two modules and make them “talk”

Wireless Sensor Network for Temperature Sensing

via Arduino Blog


This is an interesting implementation of Arduino and Wireless comunication. The user [priyansmurarka] posted:

Ok, so here is the basic problem statement. I need to develop a temperature sensing system such that the temperature from the sensor node is relayed to a co-ordinator sensor and then the co-ordinator node shows the user in a simple graphical form.

For the wireless communication, I used Xbee Series 2 modules with Arduino Board Shields.

Uses Melexis Temperature sensor and Arduino Board to monitor and plot ambient temperature.

The realization of this project is well documented on the [blog], with code, graphs and pictures.

XBee-controlled 4WD wireless robot

via Arduino Blog

In his blog, Michael describes a nice 4WD robot he realized by means of an arduino-compatible board, a motor shield and a couple of XBee radios, which have been used to implement a simple and effective remote control.

Actually, the remote is made up of a standard breadboard equipped with a joystick, a couple of buttons (that can turn the robot in a Kitt-like vehicle!) and the XBee radio. One interesting feature of this project is that the remote controller is fairly simple and has been designed to work with just the XBee radio board, instead of requiring an additional MCU.

More details can be found here.

[Via: Project Lab - Nootropic design]

Yellow Plane 2 with Inverted V Tail

via Arduino Blog

 

[nickatredbox] keeps up to date with the improvements of his project [yellow plane]. As you can find on this blog, the project is evolving week by week. Let’s see what’s today submission

1200 mm Wing space
280 mm cord
14% Clark Y
Target AUW 1300 Grams

Missing battery and camera box have a design which should weigh 140 grams empty.
The assembly shown below weighs 684 Grams no motor or electronics.
Electronics shown weigh 110 grams ESC Arduino board, Xbee, antenna and Gyro board
Motor & prop another 120 Gram

Here you have a [video]  and there you can follow the project on the [website]

Some Christmas lights projects

via Raspberry Pi

I haven’t even put my tree up yet, but lots of you have been very busy with the Christmas decorations and your Raspberry Pis. Here are some projects you’ve still got time to emulate before Santa comes.

ConsiderIT.co.uk take the whole Internet of Things idea seriously, and have wired up their office with a positive welter of fairy lights and a networked Raspberry Pi. They invite you to come and turn the lights on and off, watching the torment of their employees over a live feed. I took this screengrab from the feed from their office yesterday, and I don’t know whether to feel deep pride or terrible, terrible shame over the fact that these poor people are being subjected to this visual horror in their office courtesy of a Raspberry Pi. Nice job with the hats, guys.

A quiet moment. You should visit the site (click the image) – pretty much everything in that room has something you can make flash attached to it.

If you aren’t a sadist wanting to inflict misery and migraines on the working day of three people in a tiny room, but still want to turn some lights on and off, there’s a similar setup in a UK living room, where tree lights can be turned on and off, which was highlighted in this month’s MagPi. (The tree is turn-on-and-offable in the daytime too, but it’s much more fun at night.)

A screen grab from the live feed. This is a gentler, less guilt-inducing scene than making someone’s office flash: but you can still make these lights blink on and off like the dickens. Click the image to visit the site.

If you’re looking to do something a little less flashy, but still useful, here’s an easy one, which I found linked to from our forums. This timer turns your outdoor lights on and off according to the local sunset and sunrise times. Outside the holiday season, there are plenty of other applications you could use this setup for. You can find software and a shopping list for the hardware you’ll need, alongside helpful diagrams and photos to get you set up, at Savage Home Automation.

A very easy piece of GPIO wiring! Click the image to read more.

Finally, I found this lovely little decoration on Flickr. And assumed it was the sort of thing you buy for vast sums in expensive home interiors shops. But no! It’s a Raspberry Pi hack – just one with fewer protruding wires than we’re used to seeing. This gorgeous little object from Rumtopf  (who has some other amazing projects in his Flickr stream - the candy cane and cookie windmill that powers LEDs is my current favourite) incorporates Cheerlights, which are synchronised with other Cheerlights all over the world according to social networking trends. There’s an Arduino and an XBee radio in the box, talking wirelessly to a Raspberry Pi in another room.

Rumtopf: you should sell these. You’d make a mint. (And I want one!)

Rumtopf has made code for making your own available at Github. Let us know if you make something similar yourselves!

 

Yellow Jet

via Arduino Blog

[nickatredbox] has a passion in building planes. Here the details of another work:

Yellow Jet 758 Grams with remaining Coroplast 2 X 7.4 V 1300 mAh batteries Arduino Nano RX Xbee with antenna, servos and misc hardware. Chamfered the top on the leading edges. All control surfaces cut and hinged. ESC mounted

Elevator mechanism for EDF jet carbon rod and ballpoint pen ink reservoir seems quite stiff with low backlash

See the video here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Z9wEU6c1F0&hd=1

This plane flew pretty poorly unfortunately, but the controller worked well the EDF lacked thrust

You can find more on the [website]

Arduino Controlled Yellow Plane

via Arduino Blog

Another interesting project by [nickatredbox], you can find this and all others on the [website].

This project is a plane with the Arduino Xbee remote control working on its maiden flight. It worked well no technical issues, very happy with the results :)

Building the controller was a very interesting curve, learned a lot of practical usage solutions to problems and ended up with a simple piece of code which is always good in my experience, keep it simple but not to simple.

 

Arduino & Xbee Remote Control

via Arduino Blog

[nickatredbox] has sent this interesting project with Arduino involving wireless comunication. The fun comes when you have to decide to buy something already done or DIY.

I wanted a remote control system of my own design for may various RC model projects planes and boats. I set about researching the options and and Xbee with / Arduino solution poped out as a viable option, having failed performance testing using both WiFi and TinyCLR. The other feature I get as the Xbee is a transceiver is real-time telemetery. I’m sure I could buy this functionality from HobbyKing but where is the fun in that.

More project on the [website]

Wireless (Hacking Commodity Wireless, Practical Wireless, Contiki OS, CWIG)

via OSHUG

At the fifteenth OSHUG meeting we'll be taking a look at wireless technologies. We will hear how you can repurpose low cost commodity equipment, we will be given an introduction to RF basics, we will learn about the Contiki operating system, and we will be introduced to Ciseco's new Wireless Internet Gateway.

Hacking Commodity Wireless

Many people build their hacks from the ground up, but those short of time sometimes prefer to repurpose cheap off-the-shelf components that can be made to fit the bill. A good example being a wireless thermometer for external use, where an off-the-shelf device provides an inexpensive option complete with the requisite weatherproof packaging. However, such devices typically use proprietary protocols and good documentation is rarely available. This talk will look at how to interface such devices where a degree of reverse-engineering is frequently required.

Paul Tanner is a consultant, developer and maker in wood, metal, plastic, electronics and software. His day job is IT-based business improvement for SMEs. By night he turns energy nut, creating tools to optimise energy use. Paul graduated in electronics and was responsible for hardware and software product development and customer services in several product and service start-ups, switching to consulting in 2000.

Practical Wireless

Adding wireless connectivity to your latest open hardware project is not difficult, provided that you take the time to understand some of the principles of RF communication. In this talk we will learn about the basics of wireless propagation, and take a look at some of the low cost modules which now make adding wireless even easier.

Ken Boak joined BBC Research Department after graduating and worked on digital picture processing of HDTV images, and coding algorithms for video distribution around studios. Since then, Ken has worked in laboratory instrumentation, telecommunications, low power wireless and consumer electronics produced in the Far East. With an interest in renewables, Ken now develops laboratory instruments to teach undergraduates the principles of photovoltaic and wind power. Outside of work, Ken is interested in smart wireless sensors, open source hardware and low cost solutions for the Internet of Things.

An Introduction to the Contiki O/S

This talk is aimed to introduce the Contiki OS and some of the development hardware. We will learn about the process of bootstrapping the development environment and there will be a hands-on tutorial.

Ilya Dmitrichenko was born in Soviet Latvia in 1985, grew up and attended a secondary school there, and moved to UK as soon as Latvia joined the EU. He attended the biggest university in London and was rather disappointed with the education, but nevertheless carried on and had fun working on a final year engineering project which served as an introduction to the topic of this talk. Ilya is interested in various aspects of hardware and software, spanning from WSN to DSP and several other random fields.

CWIG — The Ciseco Wireless Internet Gateway

The CWIG is a new open hardware device that is designed to be the "one and only" platform you'd need for a wireless gateway. It employs the same ATmega328 microcontroller that is familiar to Arduino users and supports Ciseco's TI CC1110-based XRF module, XBee, Bluetooth, RFM12B, X10/HomeEasy, FRAM, SD, Ethernet and over-the-air programming with AVRDude. It's sized to be housed in a low cost, compact enclosure and to be cheap to build using through-hole components. In this talk we will be given an introduction to the CWIG and also to the XRF wireless UART and programmable RF module.

Miles Hodkinson's twenty-odd year relationship with IT ended around six years ago when he decided that it was time to do something completely different. He had looked around without success for something to log and control his wind turbine, solar panels and Lister single cylinder engine, and found that nothing was flexible enough for the money he wanted to pay (tens of pounds per device), so he decided he would try and build it himself. After a number of years working on a human-focused method of networking originally built using XBee modules and now termed LLAP, his company developed the TI CC1110-based XRF module.

Note: Please aim to arrive for 18:00 - 18:20 as the talks will start at 18:30 prompt.

Wireless (Hacking Commodity Wireless, Practical Wireless, Contiki OS, CWIG)

via OSHUG

At the fifteenth OSHUG meeting we'll be taking a look at wireless technologies. We will hear how you can repurpose low cost commodity equipment, we will be given an introduction to RF basics, we will learn about the Contiki operating system, and we will be introduced to Ciseco's new Wireless Internet Gateway.

Hacking Commodity Wireless

Many people build their hacks from the ground up, but those short of time sometimes prefer to repurpose cheap off-the-shelf components that can be made to fit the bill. A good example being a wireless thermometer for external use, where an off-the-shelf device provides an inexpensive option complete with the requisite weatherproof packaging. However, such devices typically use proprietary protocols and good documentation is rarely available. This talk will look at how to interface such devices where a degree of reverse-engineering is frequently required.

Paul Tanner is a consultant, developer and maker in wood, metal, plastic, electronics and software. His day job is IT-based business improvement for SMEs. By night he turns energy nut, creating tools to optimise energy use. Paul graduated in electronics and was responsible for hardware and software product development and customer services in several product and service start-ups, switching to consulting in 2000.

Practical Wireless

Adding wireless connectivity to your latest open hardware project is not difficult, provided that you take the time to understand some of the principles of RF communication. In this talk we will learn about the basics of wireless propagation, and take a look at some of the low cost modules which now make adding wireless even easier.

Ken Boak joined BBC Research Department after graduating and worked on digital picture processing of HDTV images, and coding algorithms for video distribution around studios. Since then, Ken has worked in laboratory instrumentation, telecommunications, low power wireless and consumer electronics produced in the Far East. With an interest in renewables, Ken now develops laboratory instruments to teach undergraduates the principles of photovoltaic and wind power. Outside of work, Ken is interested in smart wireless sensors, open source hardware and low cost solutions for the Internet of Things.

An Introduction to the Contiki O/S

This talk is aimed to introduce the Contiki OS and some of the development hardware. We will learn about the process of bootstrapping the development environment and there will be a hands-on tutorial.

Ilya Dmitrichenko was born in Soviet Latvia in 1985, grew up and attended a secondary school there, and moved to UK as soon as Latvia joined the EU. He attended the biggest university in London and was rather disappointed with the education, but nevertheless carried on and had fun working on a final year engineering project which served as an introduction to the topic of this talk. Ilya is interested in various aspects of hardware and software, spanning from WSN to DSP and several other random fields.

CWIG — The Ciseco Wireless Internet Gateway

The CWIG is a new open hardware device that is designed to be the "one and only" platform you'd need for a wireless gateway. It employs the same ATmega328 microcontroller that is familiar to Arduino users and supports Ciseco's TI CC1110-based XRF module, XBee, Bluetooth, RFM12B, X10/HomeEasy, FRAM, SD, Ethernet and over-the-air programming with AVRDude. It's sized to be housed in a low cost, compact enclosure and to be cheap to build using through-hole components. In this talk we will be given an introduction to the CWIG and also to the XRF wireless UART and programmable RF module.

Miles Hodkinson's twenty-odd year relationship with IT ended around six years ago when he decided that it was time to do something completely different. He had looked around without success for something to log and control his wind turbine, solar panels and Lister single cylinder engine, and found that nothing was flexible enough for the money he wanted to pay (tens of pounds per device), so he decided he would try and build it himself. After a number of years working on a human-focused method of networking originally built using XBee modules and now termed LLAP, his company developed the TI CC1110-based XRF module.

Note: Please aim to arrive for 18:00 - 18:20 as the talks will start at 18:30 prompt.