Tag Archives: Your Projects

Global sunrise/sunset Raspberry Pi art installation

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24h Sunrise/Sunset is a digital art installation that displays a live sunset and sunrise happening somewhere in the world with the use of CCTV.

Image by fotoswiss.com

Artist Dries Depoorter wanted to prove that “CCTV cameras can show something beautiful”, and turned to Raspberry Pi to power this global project.

Image by fotoswiss.com

Harnessing CCTV

The arresting visuals are beamed to viewers using two Raspberry Pi 3B+ computers and an Arduino Nano Every that stream internet protocol (IP) cameras with the use of command line media player OMXPlayer.

Dual Raspberry Pi power

The two Raspberry Pis communicate with each other using the MQTT protocol — a standard messaging protocol for the Internet of Things (IoT) that’s ideal for connecting remote devices with a small code footprint and minimal network bandwidth.

One of the Raspberry Pis checks at which location in the world a sunrise or sunset is happening and streams the closest CCTV camera.

The insides of the sleek display screen…

Beam me out, Scotty

The big screens are connected with the I2C protocol to the Arduino, and the Arduino is connected serial with the second Raspberry Pi. Dries also made a custom printed circuit board (PCB) so the build looks cleaner.

All that hardware is powered by an industrial power supply, just because Dries liked the style of it.

Software

Everything is written in Python 3, and Dries harnessed the Python 3 libraries BeautifulSoup, Sun, Geopy, and Pytz to calculate sunrise and sunset times at specific locations. Google Firebase databases in the cloud help with admin by way of saving timestamps and the IP addresses of the cameras.

Hardware

The artist stood infront of the two large display screens
Image of the artist with his work by fotoswiss.com

And, lastly, Dries requested a shoutout for his favourite local Raspberry Pi shop Gotron in Ghent.

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It’s a brand-new NODE Mini Server!

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NODE has long been working to create open-source resources to help more people harness the decentralised internet, and their easily 3D-printed designs are perfect to optimise your Raspberry Pi.

NODE wanted to take advantage of the faster processor and up to 8GB RAM on Raspberry Pi 4 when it came out last year. Now that our tiny computer is more than capable of being used as as a general Linux desktop system, the NODE Mini Server version 3 has been born.

As for previous versions of NODE’s Mini Server, one of their main goals for this new iteration was to package Raspberry Pi in a way which makes it a little easier to use as a regular mini server or computer. In other words, it’s put inside a neat little box with all the ports accessible on one side.

Black is incredibly slimming

Slimmer and simpler

The latest design is simplified compared to previous versions. Everything lives in a 92mm × 92mm enclosure that isn’t much thicker than Raspberry Pi itself.

The slimmed-down new case comprises a single 3D-printed piece and a top cover made from a custom-designed printed circuit board (PCB) that has four brass-threaded inserts soldered into the corners, giving you a simple way to screw everything together.

The custom PCB cover

What are the new features?

Another goal for version 3 NODE’s Mini Server was to include as much modularity as possible. That’s why this new mini server requires no modifications to the Raspberry Pi itself, thanks to a range of custom-designed adapter boards. How to take advantage of all these new features is explained at this point in NODE’s YouTube video.

Ooh, shiny and new and new and shiny

Just like for previous versions, all the files and a list of the components you need to create your own Mini Server are available for free on the NODE website.

Leave comments on NODE’s YouTube video if you’d like to create and sell your own Mini Server kits or pre-made servers. NODE is totally open to showcasing any add-ons or extras you come up with yourself.

Looking ahead, making the Mini Server stackable and improving fan circulation is next on NODE’s agenda.

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Raspberry Pi Off-World Bartender

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Three things we like: Blade Runner, robots, and cocktails. That’s why we LOVE Donald Bell‘s Raspberry Pi–packed ‘VK-01 Off-World Bartender‘ cocktail making machine.

This machine was due to be Donald’s entry into the Cocktail Robotics Grand Challenge, an annual event in San Francisco. By the time the event was cancelled, he was too deep into his awesome build to give up, so he decided to share it with the Instructables community instead.

Donald wanted users to get as much interaction and feedback as possible, rather than simply pressing a button and receiving a random drink. So with this machine, the interaction comes in four ways: instructions provided on the screen, using a key card to bypass security, placing and removing a cup on the tray, and entering an order number on the keypad.

In addition to that, feedback is provided by way of lighting changes, music, video dialogue, pump motors whirring, and even the clicks of relays at each stage of the cocktail making process.

Ordering on the keypad

close up of the black keypad

The keypad allows people to punch in a number to trigger their order, like on a vending machine. The drink order is sent to the Hello Drinkbot software running on the Raspberry Pi 3B that controls the pumps.

Getting your cup filled

Inside the cup dispenser sensor showing the switch and LEDs
The switch under the lid and ring of LEDs on the base

In order for the machine to be able to tell when a vessel is placed under the dispenser spout, and when it’s removed, Donald built in a switch under a 3D-printed tray. Provided the vessel has at least one ice cube in it, even the lightest plastic up is heavy enough to trigger the switch.

The RFID card reader

Cocktail machine customers are asked to scan a special ID card to start. To make this work, Donald adapted a sample script that blinks the card reader’s internal LED when any RFID card is detected.

Interactive video screen

close up of the interactive screen on the machine showing Japanese style script

This bit is made possible by MP4Museum, a “bare-bones” kiosk video player software that the second Raspberry Pi inside the machine runs on boot. By connecting a switch to the Raspberry Pi’s GPIO, Donald enabled customers to advance through the videos one by one. And yes, that’s an official Raspberry Pi Touch Display.

Behind the scenes of the interactive screen with the Raspberry Pi wired up
Behind the scenes of the screen with the Raspberry Pi A+ running the show

The Hello Drinkbot ‘bartender’

screen grab of the hello drinkbot web interface

Donald used the Python-based Hello Drinkbot software as the brains of the machine. With it, you can configure which liquors or juices are connected to which pumps, and send instructions on exactly how much to pour of each ingredient. Everything is configured via a web interface.

Via a bank of relays, microcontrollers connect all the signals from the Touch Display, keypad, RFID card reader, and switch under the spout.

Here’s the Fritzing diagram for this beast

Supplies

Donald shared an exhaustive kit list on his original post, but basically, what you’re looking at is…

Pencil sketches of the machine from different angles
Donald’s friend Jim Burke‘s beautiful concept sketches

And finally, check out the Raspberry Pi–based Hello Drinkbot project by Rich Gibson, which inspired Donald’s build.

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Steampunk ‘Help is coming’ Raspberry Pi alert system

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Tom Lee decided to combine his household with his sister-in-law during lockdown so that she could help him make childcare more manageable. The problem was, Tom’s household was a smidge frantic in the mornings, as the family struggled to be up and ready in time for his sister-in-law’s arrival.

Enter this Raspberry Pi–powered tracking device, which tells Tom when the family car is on its way with childcare support. The DIY appliance helps his household manage childcare routines like clockwork.

The magic is in the wooden box, but the light cage and electrical meter are all part of the show

When the family car is moving, a light turns on, and an antique electrical meter points to 30…20…10 to show the estimated minutes until the driver arrives. The movements of the car come in from a cellular Sinotrack OBD2 dongle pointed at a traccar server running on Raspberry Pi 3.

We see you in there, Raspberry Pi…

Tom explains: “I have not found traccar to be the greatest to work with, but you can make it forward everything it decodes to your own script pretty easily.”

Materials:

  • Arduino microcontrollers (ATMega328P & ESP8266 based)
  • Raspberry Pi (Model 1 and 3)
  • Dongle device in car (with SIM card and cellular service)
  • Light device with bulb and solid state relay
  • Antique electrical meter (for the steampunks among you – any similar device will do the job!) 
The light safety cage was rescued from an old workshop

The case (below) is a lasercut design Tom had made by online laser cutting business Ponoko.

Inside there’s a solid state relay and a first-generation Raspberry Pi (hidden under the black cable in the photo below). This Raspberry Pi model doesn’t have wireless connectivity, and Tom found that getting wireless working was a bit tricky for this project.

Tom produced a nice long webinar to show you exactly how this all works. So if you’d like to give this project a try, watch it for yourself.

You’ll learn how to…

Code resources

Oh, and he’s only gone and uploaded every single bit of code you’ll need on GitHub (what an angel):

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Mini Raspberry Pi Boston Dynamics–inspired robot

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This is a ‘Spot Micro’ walking quadruped robot running on Raspberry Pi 3B. By building this project, redditor /thetrueonion (aka Mike) wanted to teach themself robotic software development in C++ and Python, get the robot walking, and master velocity and directional control.

Mike was inspired by Spot, one of Boston Dynamics’ robots developed for industry to perform remote operation and autonomous sensing.

What’s it made of?

  • Raspberry Pi 3B
  • Servo control board: PCA9685, controlled via I2C
  • Servos: 12 × PDI-HV5523MG
  • LCD Panel: 16×2 I2C LCD panel
  • Battery: 2s 4000 mAh LiPo, direct connection to power servos
  • UBEC: HKU5 5V/5A ubec, used as 5V voltage regulator to power Raspberry Pi, LCD panel, PCA9685 control board
  • Thingiverse 3D-printed Spot Micro frame

How does it walk?

The mini ‘Spot Micro’ bot rocks a three-axis angle command/body pose control mode via keyboard and can achieve ‘trot gait’ or ‘walk gait’. The former is a four-phase gait with symmetric motion of two legs at a time (like a horse trotting). The latter is an eight-phase gait with one leg swinging at a time and a body shift in between for balance (like humans walking).

Mike breaks down how they got the robot walking, right down to the order the servos need to be connected to the PCA9685 control board, in this extensive walkthrough.

Here’s the code

And yes, this is one of those magical projects with all the code you need stored on GitHub. The software is implemented on a Raspberry Pi 3B running Ubuntu 16.04. It’s composed on C++ and Python nodes in a ROS framework.

What’s next?

Mike isn’t finished yet: they are looking to improve their yellow beast by incorporating a lidar to achieve simple 2D mapping of a room. Also on the list is developing an autonomous motion-planning module to guide the robot to execute a simple task around a sensed 2D environment. And finally, adding a camera or webcam to conduct basic image classification would finesse their creation.

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Track your punches with Raspberry Pi

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‘Track-o-punches’ tracks the number of punches thrown during workouts with Raspberry Pi and a Realsense camera, and it also displays your progress and sets challenges on a touchscreen.

In this video, Cisco shows you how to set up the Realsense camera and a Python virtual environment, and how to install dependencies and OpenCV for Python on your Raspberry Pi.

How it works

A Realsense robotic camera tracks the boxing glove as it enters and leaves the frame. Colour segmentation means the camera can more precisely pick up when Cisco’s white boxing glove is in frame. He walks you through how to threshold images for colour segmentation at this point in the video.

Testing the tracking

All this data is then crunched on Raspberry Pi. Cisco’s code counts the consecutive frames that the segmented object is present; if that number is greater than a threshold, the code sees this as a particular action.

Raspberry Pi 4 being mounted on the Raspberry Pi 7″ Touch Display

Cisco used this data to set punch goals for the user. The Raspberry Pi computer is connected to an official Raspberry Pi 7″ Touch Display in order to display “success” and “fail” messages as well as the countdown clock. Once a goal is reached, the touchscreen tells the boxer that they’ve successfully hit their target. Then the counter resets and a new goal is displayed. You can manipulate the code to set a time limit to reach a punch goal, but setting a countdown timer was the hardest bit to code for Cisco.

Kit list

Jeeeez, it’s hard to get a screen grab of Cisco’s fists of fury

A mobile power source makes it easier to set up a Raspberry Pi wherever you want to work out. Cisco 3D-printed a mount for the Realsense camera and secured it on the ceiling so it could look down on him while he punched.

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