Tag Archives: arduino

Play your emotional state with Social Vibes and twitter

via Arduino Blog

mabos2-2

Social Vibes’ is a Masters Degree (MSc.) project, in Interactive Media by Cian McLysaght, at the University of Limerick, Ireland. They shared with us their project, running on Arduino Uno, composed by a physical artifact designed and created specifically for an installation adopting the fundamental sound mechanisms used in a vibraphone, know also as a ‘Vibe’:

The instrument consists of twelve musical tones of different pitches. The music created on the instrument is derived from a continuous stream of input via multiple users on Twitter and the explicit interaction from Twitter users, tweeting the instrument directly to the project’s, “@vibe_experiment” Twitter account. Data associated with the emotional status of Twitter users, is mined from the Twitter network via Twitter’s open source, application programming interface (API).

For example if a user tweets “The sun is out, I’m happy”, the code I’ve written will strip out key words and strings associated with the user’s emotional state, within the tweets, ie “I’m happy”, and translate this to a musical notation. Mining Twitter’s API, allows a continuous stream of data. These emotional states are then mapped to specific notes on the physical musical instrument, located in a public space. The tempo of the musical expression will be entirely based upon the speed and volume of the incoming tweets on the Twitter API.

Twitter users who are both followers and non followers of the musical instrument’s Twitter account (@vibe_experiment) can tweet directly to the instrument and this direct interaction will be given precedence, allowing user’s who tweet directly to have their emotional state ‘played’. This allows users to hijack or take over the instrument and experiment with it in a playful manner, but also allows those with musical knowledge the potential to compose simple musical arrangements. When users are not tweeting the instrument directly, then the instrument will revert to mining the Twitter API.

To entice users to interact and observe the action of the instrument there is a live streaming broadcast of the instrument via Twitcam on the Vibe’s Twitter account. This is a live streaming broadcast of the instrument via Twitcam on the @vibe_experiment account. Twitcam, is Twitter’s built in live-streaming platform. This simply requires a webcam and a valid Twitter account.

The instrument constantly tweets back updates to it’s own Twitter account to not only inform people of the general status but also to engage users to interact directly with the ‘Vibe’.

Open Source 3D Printed Rocket Engine controlled by Arduino

via Arduino Blog

Openrocket_Small

Fubar Hackerspace (New Jersey) member Graham has been working on an open source liquid fuel rocket engine with regenerative cooling and precise flow control build on Arduino Uno.  In order to test it he’s also built a cool rig for testing propellant flow control:

My project is building Open Source 3D Printed Rocket Engines with Arduino microcontrollers. As an individual interested in building liquid fueled rocket engines as a hobby I quickly realized there were almost no resources online or forums to share or learn from others. I decided to combine my interests in Software, hardware and open source projects to develop and build a functioning liquid fueled rocket engine. However, unlike most other projects it had to be open source and easily re-produced.

In order to ensure it was as open source as possible I used the Arduino Uno board and IDE to develop software to safely control the engine. To meet the easily reproducible requirement I decided that 3D printing was the right approach rather than labor/time intensive traditional machining.

The end result is an engine that can easily be reproduced or modified. This gives others interested in this hobby a starting point for best practices, safety, etc… so that future projects aren’t starting out from scratch.

All of my design files and software are on GitHub  and a detailed description of the write-up is on the FUBAR labs makerspace wiki 

Here’s the video of the testing of the 3D Printed GOX/Ethanol Injector:

Connecting a telegraph with 21st century networks

via Arduino Blog

twittter-telegraph

Twitter telegraph is a project by Devon Elliot making telegraph sounder tap out Twitter messages using Arduino Uno. It’s an interesting attempt to connect technology rooted in the 19th- and early 20th-centuries with 21st-century networks:

A local architectural heritage project spawned a wider interest in railways and roundhouses. One of the related technologies of railways in the 19th century was the telegraph. Having acquired an old telegraph sounder, we wondered if it could tap out Twitter messages.

An Arduino UNO was used to test and control the telegraph sounder. The coils on the telegraph were tested with power drawn from the Arduino’s 3.3V and 5.0V pins. Momentarily powering the telegraph from the Arduino confirmed that the coils still worked, and the device made satisfying clicks in response from the electromagnetic action of the coils.

With it confirmed that the telegraph is still operable, the Arduino UNO was then used to control the sounder. Mark Fickett’s Arduinomorse library was a quick route to controlling the telegraph in Morse code timing. Using that library, string characters are converted into Morse code, and a digital pin on the Arduino goes high and low, as if to turn an LED on and off. That pin became the control pin for the telegraph, and simple circuit was built using a transistor, resistor and diode to control the telegraph without damaging the Arduino’s digital pins. This circuit is common for connecting relays to Arduinos.

The final step was adding an Adafruit FONA to the Arduino. The FONA connects to cellular phone networks, and the Arduino UNO can interact with it by sending and receiving actions to and from the FONA. In this case, the FONA connects to the cellular network and the Arduino checks the FONA periodically to see if there are any SMS messages available. If there are, the Arduino starts to read through them, convert them to Morse code, and tap them out on the telegraph.

The completed device can be operated from batteries if necessary, providing operation anywhere a cellular signal can reach. The cellular connection provides wireless connectivity with the FONA handling the connection, rather than the Arduino.

To package it up, the Arduino UNO and FONA were attached to a piece of acrylic. That board was then mounted under the telegraph sounder’s resonator. Four holes were pre-existing in the resonator’s base and used for mounting, so no permanent alterations were made to the historic components.

See it in action:

OK Google, Open Sesame

via Hackaday » hardware

There are a myriad of modern ways to lock and unlock doors. Keypads, Fingerprint scanners, smart card readers, to name just a few. Quite often, adding any of these methods to an old door may require replacing the existing locking mechanism. Donning his Bollé sunglasses allowed [Dheera] to come up with a slightly novel idea to unlock doors without having to change his door latch. Using simple, off the shelf hardware, a Smartwatch, some code crunching and a Google Now app, he was able to yell “OK Google, Open Sesame” at his Android Wear smartwatch to get his apartment  door to open up.

The hardware, in his own words, is trivial. An Arduino, an HC-05 bluetooth module and a servo. The servo is attached to his door latch using simple hardware that looks sourced from the closest hardware store. The code is split in to two parts. The HC-05 listens for a trigger signal, and informs the Arduino over serial. The Arduino in turn activates the servo to open the door. The other part is the Google Now app. Do note that the code, as he clearly points out, is “barebones”. If you really want to implement this technique, it would be wise to add in authentication to prevent all and sundry from opening up your apartment door and stealing your precious funky Sunglasses. Watch a video of how he put it all together after the break. And if you’re interested, here are a few other door lock hacks we’ve featured in the past.


Filed under: Android Hacks, hardware

A collective instrument capturing breathe with paper windmills

via Arduino Blog

cataSopros

Cata Sopros is interactive sound installation running on Arduino Uno and created by Elas Duas, a multidisciplinary studio based in the city of Guimarães (Portugal). If you translate the title from portuguese it means: Breathe Catchers. In fact the project is a collective musical instrument made with paper windmills transforming the users’ breathe into sounds:

The windmills have inbuilt electret microphones that were connected to an Arduino Uno. The sensor data was then sent to MaxMSP and the sounds were played with Ableton Live. The video was shot at the cloister of the beautiful Alberto Sampaio museum in Guimarães, Portugal.

Enjoy the video:

A tutorial about avoiding warping with Arduino Materia 101

via Arduino Blog

materia101tutorial9

Some of you may have experienced that when you start to print a cube or box-shaped objects they can easily warp on the corners. The reason for this is the change of volume that plastic goes through when cooling down: it shrinks when becoming cooler. Even if PLA, the corn-based plastic we use on the Arduino Materia 101, shrinks much less than ABS, it can become a problem when printing things that require a high level of precision.

That’s why Kristoffer prepared a tutorial to solve the problem and shares some 3dprinting tricks with all of you. Follow the 5 steps of the tutorial and learn how to print without warping.

materia1o1-tut9

Check the previous tutorials on 3d printing with Material 101

Interested in getting in touch and showing your experiments? Join Kristoffer on the Arduino forum dedicated to Materia 101 and give us your feedback.

Immersive performances with 3D mapping and Arduino

via Arduino Blog

angle02

ANGLE project is a Florence-based duo and also the name of the amazing audiovisual performance that applies videomapping techniques to live sets. The duo produces and composes all the songs with synchronised video images using 3D mapping on a self-supporting, isostatic, modular structure that is made up of triangles with junctions at their vertices.

TETRA 02 is the title of ANGLE’s new live set composed of a structure equipped with LED lights, animated live using Arduino Uno & Mad Light.

angle-arduino

Arduino IDE 1.6 is released! Download it now

via Arduino Blog

Icon_download-02-05

 

After almost two years “in the making” we’re thrilled to announce the availability of the Arduino IDE 1.6.0. The latest version of the development environment used by millions of people across the globe brings about a lot of improvements.

Since the day we started developing the first 1.5 version we have received a lot of feedback, suggestions and contributions from our vibrant community and we would like to thank you all for your passion and good will: thank you everyone, you rock! :-)

We are glad to say that 1.6.0 includes a lot of new features. Here is a not so brief list of them:

  • Support for multiple platforms
  • Boards are detected and listed on “ports list” menu together with the serial port
  • Drivers and IDE are now signed for Windows and MacOSX
  • Improved speed of build process
  • Autosave when compiling/uploading sketch
  • A lot of improvements of the serial monitor (faster, backed by modern JSSC serial library instead of old RXTX)
  • Find/replace over multiple tabs
  • Improved lots of Arduino API libraries (String, Serial, Print, etc.)
  • Tools & toolchains upgrades (avr-gcc, arm-gcc, avrdude, bossac)
  • Command line interface
  • IDE reports both sketch size and static RAM usage
  • Editor shows line numbers
  • Scrollable menus when many entries are listed
  • Upload via network (Yún)
  • HardwareSerial has been improved
  • USB has got some stability and performance improvements
  • SPI library now supports “transactions” for better interoperability when using multiple SPI devices at the same time
  • Better support to 3rd party hardware vendors with configuration files (platform.txt and boards.txt)
  • Submenus with board configuration can now be defined
  • Fix for upload problems on Leonardo, Micro and Yún.
  • Libraries bundled with Arduino have been improved and bugfixed, in particular: Bridge, TFT, Ethernet, Robot_Control, SoftwareSerial, GSM
  • A lot of minor bugs of the user interface have been fixed

There is still lots of room for improvement, of course. Don’t forget to report any issue you find, either on Github or on the Arduino forum: your help is very much appreciated. It doesn’t matter if you are not a tech specialist: every feedback adds value.

We are already working on release 1.6.1, with some very cool features we will announce in the coming weeks.

The IDE is available from the newly redesigned Download page.

 

Arduino IDE 1.6 is released! Download it now

via Arduino Blog

Icon_download-02-05

 

After almost two years “in the making” we’re thrilled to announce the availability of the Arduino IDE 1.6.0. The latest version of the development environment used by millions of people across the globe brings about a lot of improvements.

Since the day we started developing the first 1.5 version we have received a lot of feedback, suggestions and contributions from our vibrant community and we would like to thank you all for your passion and good will: thank you everyone, you rock! :-)

We are glad to say that 1.6.0 includes a lot of new features. Here is a not so brief list of them:

  • Support for multiple platforms
  • Boards are detected and listed on “ports list” menu together with the serial port
  • Drivers and IDE are now signed for Windows and MacOSX
  • Improved speed of build process
  • Autosave when compiling/uploading sketch
  • A lot of improvements of the serial monitor (faster, backed by modern JSSC serial library instead of old RXTX)
  • Find/replace over multiple tabs
  • Improved lots of Arduino API libraries (String, Serial, Print, etc.)
  • Tools & toolchains upgrades (avr-gcc, arm-gcc, avrdude, bossac)
  • Command line interface
  • IDE reports both sketch size and static RAM usage
  • Editor shows line numbers
  • Scrollable menus when many entries are listed
  • Upload via network (Yún)
  • HardwareSerial has been improved
  • USB has got some stability and performance improvements
  • SPI library now supports “transactions” for better interoperability when using multiple SPI devices at the same time
  • Better support to 3rd party hardware vendors with configuration files (platform.txt and boards.txt)
  • Submenus with board configuration can now be defined
  • Fix for upload problems on Leonardo, Micro and Yún.
  • Libraries bundled with Arduino have been improved and bugfixed, in particular: Bridge, TFT, Ethernet, Robot_Control, SoftwareSerial, GSM
  • A lot of minor bugs of the user interface have been fixed

There is still lots of room for improvement, of course. Don’t forget to report any issue you find, either on Github or on the Arduino forum: your help is very much appreciated. It doesn’t matter if you are not a tech specialist: every feedback adds value.

We are already working on release 1.6.1, with some very cool features we will announce in the coming weeks.

The IDE is available from the newly redesigned Download page.

 

Casa Jasmina Project is about to roll, with style

via Arduino Blog

oscola

The location of the Casa Jasmina apartment will officially be inaugurated here in Torino (Italy) on the 20th of February, together with the celebration of  the 3rd birthday of local Officine Arduino and Fablab Torino.

The two following days (21-22 of February) we’re going to start producing the first connected things for the apartment in a workshop with the support of Jesse Howard, a designer focusing on new systems of making.

He’ll fly in from Amsterdam and run a 2-day session together with Lorenzo Romagnoli (Casa Jasmina Project Manager) and Stefano Paradiso (Fablab Torino Coordinator) with the goal of designing and manufacturing an Open Source Connected Lamp (OSCOLA).

The workshop is suitable for designers, artists, hackers, and everyone interested in Arduino and open source design and in order to stress the idea of open design, participants will be asked to reinterpret, modify and redesign an open source lamp proposed by Jesse Howard.
A minimum familiarity with of CAD drawings, digital fabrication techniques and Arduino are recommended but not strictly necessary.

colorized-ordered+color

By changing materials, shape, use cases, mechanics, and interaction, we are going to create a family of open source lamps.
Arduino Yún will be used to make the lamp interactive, enabling the user to turn it on or off remotely; change the light color; use the light to visualize data etc, or connect one lamp to an other.

The OSCOLA workshop (book your participation!)  consists of 16 hours of class taking place at Fablab Torino and a ticket is valid for two people.  At the end of the workshop, each couple of participants will bring home their IoT open-source lamp and a copy will be reproduced to stay at Casa Jasmina!

Circular Knitic and the power of doers in open source

via Arduino Blog

circularknitic

Circular Knitic is an open hardware project created for DOERS, an exhibition curated by Arduino co-founder David Cuartielles, which takes place at Etopia Center for Art & Technology in Zaragoza, Spain.

It consists of an exhibition and a series of presentations, workshops and seminars focusing on the world of open creation, invention and personal fabrication. It aims to unveil a variety of extraordinary creations, ideas that are transforming the world, but mostly show visitors a group of people: “the DOERS, constantly looking for new projects that surprise us”.

During a period of eight months, 5 knitting machines will be knitting slowly and produce enough tubulars so that the ceiling of the art centre will be covered with knitted scarves.

Using digital fabrication and maker tools like 3D printing, laser cutting, makerbeam, and Arduino Uno— Knitic duo designed a replicable circular knitting machine. It’s not the first time they experiment on knitting techniques. A couple of years ago I interviewed them on this blog for their previous project focused on giving a new brain to old knitting machines using Arduino Due.

circularknitic2

Various designers are experimenting with 3D printing in fashion but this doesn’t mean  to 3d print garments directly. Knitic approach shows how digital fabrication could have greater impact on the way clothes are prototyped and produced, especially on producing new concepts of machines:

In maker culture, production of textiles is often overlooked. Circular Knitic demonstrates that beautiful textiles can be produced with digital fabrication tools.

Most of Circular Knitic parts are made with  RepRap 3D printers, some others are made of plexiglass that can be easily lasercut in a fablab. Instructions and all the stl files for the components are available for download on the project’s GitHub page.

The videos below shows the building of the machines and when they are in action.

 

What have you built with Arduino? Interview 14&15 #MFRome14

via Arduino Blog

beeuno

Maker Faire Rome video interviews – “What have you built with Arduino?” – A couple of new protagonists for our short series:

  • Bee Uno – Arduino-controlled DJ midi controller, interview with the makers

 

  • ITIS-LS – F. Giordani students’ quad ambient controller

Explore playlist on Youtube >>

Design a LEGO-compatible servo holder and print it with Materia 101

via Arduino Blog

Materiatut7

This week we are presenting you a new tutorial on 3d printing of Lego-compatible pieces with Materia 101. Kristoffer designed a brick with the parametric 3d modeler FreeCAD that can hold a small servo. Following the 10-step instructions  you can easily add wheels to robots built in LEGO and  use specific servos with different sizes.


Check the previous tutorials on 3d printing with Material 101

Interested in getting in touch and showing your experiments? Join Kristoffer on the Arduino forum dedicated to Materia 101 and give us your feedback.

materiatut7-3

Fifty speakers for an interactive sound sculpture

via Arduino Blog

hive_2_cu

Hive (2.0) is the second iteration of an interactive sound sculpture consisting of fifty speakers and seven audio channels. The sensors detect the proximity of people and Arduino manipulates audio according to it.

hive_2_ls-e1418336047882

It was created by Hopkins Duffield, a Toronto-based collaborative duo exploring ways to combine both new and familiar mediums with artistically technological practices. In this work they used Arduino Uno together with Max 6 / Max For Live.
Check the video to listen to the sculpture:

An Arduino at Heart prototyping board you can DIY

via Arduino Blog

Newtc Prototyping board

Newtc is our latest partner joining the Arduino At Heart program with three new products of the same family.

The Prototyping Board by Newtc is an Arduino At Heart coming in a couple of versions: the DIY version you can assemble and solder yourself and the Assembled version ready to be used. The CPU of the boards ( ATMEGA328P-PU ) is already burned with Arduino Uno bootloader. In addition to the boards, Newtc provides also the Arduino At Heart USB to Serial uploader for Arduino compatible boards.

In the picture below you can see the components of the DIY Version and in the video you can follow the tutorial and learn how to assembled it!

newtcDIY2