Tag Archives: arduino

Single tube Lethal Nixie clock

via Dangerous Prototypes

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Andrew Moser made a lethal nixie tube clock:

Clock 1: Single tube Lethal Nixie clock — you know having all the high voltage lines exposed and un-insulated. Inspiration for this design was from this clock. Unfortunately I built mine right after having surgery. I think the painkillers had something to do with the aesthetics… Anyhow I wasn’t electrocuted while building it under the meds…That’s always a plus!
ATMEGA 328 arduino with a DS1307 RTC for timekeeping. Basically the arduino pulls time from the RTC then updates IO. During this it’s got a time based ISR that: interrupts the code, measures the high voltage, then makes necessary tweaks to the boost converter duty cycle via a proportional controller.

Project info at ReiBot.org.

Check out the video after the break.

 

Dot² isn’t your typical coffee table

via Arduino Blog

Coffee tables are useful for putting coffee, food, or perhaps way too much junk on, but it’s 2017—we can do better than that! Akshay Baweja certainly has at least with Dot², an interactive piece of furniture that can run animations, display lighting effects, and play old-school games.

The Arduino Mega-based table features a matrix of 296 LEDs that shine up through sections of diffused acrylic, and uses a grid of foam board strips to keep each light in a square. Dot² can be controlled either by a PC running GLEDIATOR software, or via a smartphone using a Bluetooth connection and its own custom app.

The outside doesn’t look too shabby either. With an interesting wood pattern on the side, even when off it seems like there could be something more lurking just below the table’s glass!

Want to build one of your own? Head over to this incredible project’s Instructables page to get started. And, if you’d like to know more about how it’s controlled, check out Baweja’s app here or GLEDIATOR’s site for the computer software he used.

A 3D-printed e-drum pad

via Arduino Blog

After making his first drum with a laser cutter, Ryo Kosaka redesigned it as a 3D-printed structure so more people could build it.

If you’d like to practice playing the drums, but would rather not disturb your family, roommate, neighbors, dog, etc., then an electronic version is probably a good idea. Since you’re reading our blog, making one would be even better!

Although details on how it was interfaced software-wise with the Arduino Uno aren’t included in his log, the drum itself looks quite good. It’s 3D-printed out of several individual pieces, which are glued together using thick paper to help hold everything intact. The sectioned design means that you only need a 120mm x 120mm print area to produce this 8-inch drum pad.

Kosaka also goes into how to set up the piezo sensor for drum use in his write-up, which should be quite useful for this design, or even something derived from it. You can check out the project page for more details as well as Thingiverse for the print files. Additionally, Kosaka recommends this Rockband controller to MIDI Instructable or this one featuring a homemade electronic drum kit.

Interactive geodesic LED dome = Extreme geometric fun!

via Arduino Blog

We’ve all seen geodesic domes in one form or another, whether as a modern experiment, as housing from a bygone era, or perhaps as a gigantic structure in Orlando (technically a geodesic sphere). Jon Bumstead apparently wasn’t satisfied with current dome options, and instead created his own, integrating elements from programmable LED tables to make it interactive.

The resulting build is quite spectacular. Each triangular section able to be lit up with an RGB LED, and further information is output to five MIDI signals in order to produce sound. This means that up to five people can play the dome as an instrument simultaneously. If that wasn’t enough, the Arduino Uno-based dome is programmed to play a version of Simon or Pong, and can be set up to display a light show!

I constructed a geodesic dome consisting of 120 triangles with an LED and sensor at each triangle. Each LED can be addressed individually and each sensor is tuned specifically for a single triangle. The dome is programmed with an Arduino to light up and produce a MIDI signal depending on which triangle you place your hand.

Pretty cool, right? Head over to the project’s Instructables page to see more, or if you’d like information on constructing the dome itself, check out Domerama.

Emulate a Commodore 64 keyboard with a modern PC and an Arduino

via Arduino Blog

Using an Arduino, Adam Podstawczynski is able to translate keystrokes on his notebook to character inputs on a C64.

If you enjoy using a Commodore 64, but either don’t like (or perhaps don’t have) its keyboard, Podstawczynski’s project could be a great solution. His build runs a Python script on a PC, Mac, or Linux computer, which maps Commodore keys to a series of binary digits. It then sends this data over USB to an Arduino Mega, which in turn uses an MT8088 crosspoint switch to interface with the mainboard of a C64, allowing for hardware keyboard emulation.

This setup can act as a simple keyboard interface from the computer, or could be employed as a macro generator for demonstration purposes. It could even enable you to input an entire BASIC program on your PC, then send it to the C64 as desired!

Check out Podstawczynski’s page for more info on this work in progress.

Control a tracked robot with your mind (or joystick)

via Arduino Blog

Whether you choose to control this vehicle with your mind or a joystick, the camera mounted on it will give you a new view of the world.

Maker “Imetomi” was inspired to create a tracked robot after he was able to salvage a camera off of a cheap drone. This became the basis of his FPV setup, which he fitted onto a little tracked vehicle. Although this would have been enough for most people, in addition to building a joystick-based controller, he also made it work with a brainwave headset.

Imetomi now has something that he can drive around virtually, spying on passersby, as long as it stays within the VR transmitter’s 50-meter range. Be sure to check out the video below, where the small bot shows of its impressive all-terrain capabilities, and read his Instructables write-up here.