Tag Archives: arduino

Olympus RS-24 foot pedal mod

via Dangerous Prototypes

P1050272

Rupert Hirst writes:

For a while now, I have been toying with the idea of modifying a transcriber foot pedal into a programmable HID device. This could be useful for those complicated keyboard macros , Push to Talk  or even for a more natural feel in racing type games, although not with proportional control.
Your feet are generally wasted whilst sat at the computer, other than tapping to a beat. With a whole industry and trend built from standing desks and the health issues in the media regarding sitting for hours at a time, maybe it’s time to get a free leg exercise.
Meet the Olympus RS-24 foot pedal… sporting three proprietary software driven functions, rewind, fast forward and listen, all your secretary could ever dream of.

Project info at Rupert’s RunawayBrainz blog.

Specan, a reboot of the W7ZOI/K7TAU spectrum analyzer

via Dangerous Prototypes

specan

Ashhar Farhan blogged about his spectrum analyzer build:

The Specan is actually a very simple but robustly built receiver. it is, in essence, a double conversion superhet receiver with 112 Mhz and 12 Mhz Intermediate frequencies. The first mixer uses an Si570 as the local oscillator. The second oscillator is a crystal controlled at 100 MHz; built with a common microprocessor crystal of 20 MHz. Unlike most radio receivers, the second IF has two filters : a narrow band crystal filter with 1 Khz bandwidth and a wide band LC filter with 300 Khz bandwidth. The detector converts the tuned signals into a log scale. The detector output is a decibel measure of the incoming signal.
The Specan is controlled with an Arduino board. The Arduino controls the Si570, handles the front panel, talks to the computer over the USB port, reads the detector and switches the filters.
In a very simple usage, the Specan can be tuned around like a regular radio. Instead of listening to the signals, you read their strength on the LCD display.

Check out the video after the break.

Project info at Farhan’s VU2ESE’s radio experiments blog.

Via SolderSmoke blog.

Play like a spy with L.E.A.P. Engine

via Arduino Blog

lasereap

 

Toronto-based collaborative duo Hopkins Duffield created a gaming environment running on Arduino Mega in which the player battles a laser wielding A.I. security system gone awry. It’s like being in an action movie, walking in a pitch black room filled with the hollow sound of a machine breathing and a series of red laser fences slicing through the fog-filled air!

Laser Equipped Annihilation Protocol (The L.E.A.P. Engine) is a an installation that :

explores the personality of a snarky and mysterious game sentience who has infected a room with technological systems that challenge players and collect data. With a limited amount of time, the player must pass through a complicated series of changing and alternating laser patterns without tripping any of the lasers in order to deactivate the system and win the game. If the player trips a laser or if the timer runs out, it’s game over.

The gaming installation uses Max 6, Max For Live, an Arduino Mega 2560 R3 and custom electronic circuits. They also used a special modification of Lasse Vestergaard’s and Rasmus Lunding’s ArduinoInOutForDummies designed to allow communication between Arduino 2560 and Max 7. In Max, laser patterns are written using MIDI.

Take a look at the video to discover how they made it:

Simple scalar network analyzer

via Dangerous Prototypes

ddstop

rheslip blogged about his simple scalar network analyzer project:

The principle is to stimulate an electrical network with a sinewave and measure the magnitude of the response. If we sweep over a range of frequencies and measure the power transmitted through the network we can determine its frequency response.  Transfer from the input port (1) to the output port (2) is called the network’s S12 S-parameter response. By using a return loss bridge or coupler we can measure the reflected power – the S11 response. A Vector Network Analyzer is a much more complex piece of gear that measures the phase response of the network as well.
In practical terms, a Scalar Network Analyzer allows you to test and characterize crystal filters, attenuators, highpass/lowpass/bandpass filters, cable losses, and antennas among other things. Its also useful as a signal generator and the power detector can be used on its own for power measurements.

Source code is on github.  Project info at rheslip’s blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Exploring tangible user interfaces and soundscapes

via Arduino Blog

balam-rain

Originally from Guatemala, Balam Soto is an artist and maker of software and hardware creating interactive art installations and public artworks that fuse low tech with high tech. He recently shared with us a project called Exp.Inst.Rain and running on Arduino Uno:

” Exp.Inst.Rain” is an interactive installation and experimental instrument that incorporates projection and sound generated by a wireless box made of wood, plexiglas, Arduino, electronic components and custom touch sensors. By touching the box at various points, participants create different sounds; these sounds then generate changes in the projection.

It is an analysis of the social and cultural adoption of tangible user interface. Globally, touch devices are increasingly common; people understand how to use them. “Exp.Inst.Rain” analyses this new technology and makes use of this new common understanding to fuse sound and visuals into realtime interactivity.

This artworks it’s power by Arduino and wireless vibes , using Capacitive Touch Sensor and home made aluminum electrode to pick up touch. Custom software acts as a Bridge between the Exp.inst.X and Midi software.

 

A tribute to 5-bit Baudot code

via Arduino Blog

05emile

Julian Hespenheide is an interaction designer based in Germany who submitted to Arduino blogpost a writing machine called émile. It’s an interactive installation created in collaboration with Irena Kukric, David Beermann, Jasna Dimitrovskais and using Baudot code - a binary 5-bit code, predecessor of ASCII and EBCDID – intended for telecommunication and electronic devices, representing the entire alphabet.

06emile 08emile 09emile 04emile

It runs on Arduino Uno and  translates the bauds (/?b??d/, unit symbol Bd) into moving objects that are being sent over physical tracks in order to illustrate  a simple computational process of 5-bit binary information transmission:

The machine was built in six days with four people. In our group we came to the conclusion, that not every process in a computer is really transparent and it already starts when you type a simple letter on a keyboard. To unwrap this “black box” of data transmission, we set our goal to build a small writing machine where you can literally see bits rolling around. After some research we got back to the beginnings of Telefax machines and data transmission using Baudot-code. We then quickly designed punchcards and mapped them to a slightly altered baudot code table and cut them with a laser cutter from 5mm plywood.
Whenever a marble hits a switch, a short timer goes off and waits for input on the other switches. If no other marbles are hitting those switches, we finally translate the switches that have been hit into the corresponding letter.

Take a look at the machine in action: