Tag Archives: arduino

Opensourcing imagination and sharing knowledge in Nepal

via Arduino Blog

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David Cuartielles held a worshop at Campus Party Berlin introducing  Arduino and the cool things you can do with it. Some months later, on of the students, Sanjeet Raj Pandey, wrote him to reveal that the event was a life changing moment.

After that Sajeet decided  to share his knowledge and experience organising workshops in a rural city called Janakpur in Nepal. In that occasion a 100 participants got introduced to Arduino. They learnt how to blink LEDs, work with a temperature sensor, light sensor, ultrasound sensor and also to make a DIY Arduino:

Most of it was financed by myself and a bit of donation from Telecommunication department -Technical University of Berlin and Berlin Promotion Agency.

I like to make things which are real and can be put to work for society . Making things, one just cannot see but also touch is awesome.

Hope you will share Janakpur (Nepal) as one more place with Arduino. I would be keeping up pace and will be doing more such projects, workshops, seminars, remote sessions, etc for students in Nepal.

These are some pictures from the workshops:

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Art Showcase: Escape III

via Raspberry Pi

Hey all! It’s Rachel again. I have another amazing Art Showcase for you. This time Neil Mendoza explains how he and Anthony Goh brought these animated bird sculptures to life with the help of a Raspberry Pi, some Arduinos and lots of old mobile phone parts.

I really love this one XD – read right to the bottom if you want to see the birds in action. Over to Neil…

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Mobile phones are ubiquitous in today’s society, but often their use has unintended consequences, intruding into and changing social situations, distancing people in in real life by dragging them into the digital world.  They are also a massive source of electronic waste.  A few years ago this inspired Anthony Goh and me (Neil Mendoza) to create an installation that takes cast-off devices and suggests an alternate reality in which these unwanted phones and noises become something beautiful, giving them a new life by creating an experience that people can share together in person.  The Barbican recently asked commissioned us to create a new flock of birds for their awesome Digital Revolution exhibition.  Here’s a little tech breakdown of how they work.

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In previous versions, the birds were independent, but this time we decided to have a Raspberry Pi at the heart of the installation controlling them all.  This gave us the most flexibility to animate them independently or choreographed them together.

The exhibition is travelling so we wanted the installation to be as easy to set up as possible to so we decided to make each bird talk to the Raspberry Pi over ethernet.  This means that communications are reliable over long distances and each bird is self-contained and only needs a power and data cable connected to it.

The next challenge to overcome was to figure out how to call a bird.  In previous incarnations, each bird included a functioning mobile phone that you could call.  However, as there is no reception in the gallery, we decided to include a different era of phone junk and make people call the birds with a rotary phone from the 1940s.  The system looks something like this…

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To make the phone feel phoney, the receiver is connected to a serial mp3 player, controlled by an Arduino that plays the appropriate audio depending on the state of the installation, e.g. dialling tone, bird song etc.  The Arduino also reads numbers that from the rotary dial and if one of the birds’ numbers is dialled it sends it over ethernet to the Raspberry Pi.

The iBirdBrain app running on the Raspberry Pi is written in openFrameworks.  When iBirdBrain receives a number from the phone, it wakes the appropriate bird up and tells it to move randomly.  It then picks an animation created using James George’s ofxTimeline and plays it with some added randomness.  The current state of each part of the bird is sent every frame over ethernet as a three byte message:

Byte 1: Type, e.g. ‘s’ for servo

Byte 2: Data 1, e.g. servo index

Byte 3: Data 2, e.g. servo angle

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So the status of the app could be seen quickly without needing to SSH into the Pi we decided to use a PiTFT screen.  To begin with we rendered the OpenGL output of the app to the PiTFT screen, however as the screen runs at 20 FPS this created an unnecessary bottleneck.  In the end, we decided to set the screen up so that it would render the console output from the openFrameworks app.  After that, the app ran at a solid 60 FPS.  Outputting a '\r' character to the console goes back to the beginning of the line, so I used this to create a constantly updating console output that didn’t scroll, e.g.:

cout << ‘\r’ << statusMessage;

The birds themselves each contain an Arduino.  They speak ethernet using an ENC28J60 ethernet module and this library.  To start with I used TCP but running a TCP stack along with all the other stuff we were asking the bird to do, proved a little too much for its little brain so we moved to using UDP as it requires less memory and processor cycles.  An ID for each bird was programmed into the EEPROM of the Arduino.  That way, there only needed to be one firmware for all the birds, the birds themselves would then set all of their data, IP address, peripherals etc based on their ID.

Each bird has multiple parts that are controlled by the Arduino, servos for the wings and heads, piezo sounders, Neopixels and a screen for the face.

Escape III is on display at Digital Revolution until 14th September at the Barbican in London – I’m so excited, I’m going next week!

If you can’t make it, you can see the birds here:

Two steampunk espresso machines running on Arduino Mega

via Arduino Blog

vidastech on taste.kr

There’s a team of designers based in Korea who are passionate about coffee machines. Their name is Vidastech and recently shared with us two new hand-assembled machines prototyped  with Arduino Mega called Hexagon and Revolucion.

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Take a look at the gallery for more pictures:

 

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A new way of learning and transmitting knowledge with Arduino

via Arduino Blog

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The training program Creative Technologies in the Classroom (CTC) is a 3-month  educative program designed by David Cuartielles and Arduino Verkstad in collaboration with Fundación Telefónica, Fundación la Caixa and Ultra-lab.

It’s a toolbox comprised of more than 20 hands-on, easily assembled electronic experiments; an online source for course materials and documentation tools; and a collaborative space where teachers can meet with a moderator to share their findings and ask technical questions.

It aims to train teachers of Technology and students to creative technologies, which means technologies empowering young students to make devices, machines, art-works, experiments etc., enable them to learn doing things and to express themselves as creators.

Teachers are trained in programming with Processing and prototyping with Arduino, in order to become a mentor and help all along the program the students, following the different step-by-step experiments of the program.

The beneficial aspect of this program is not only about acquiring new skills and technical knowledge but mainly on experimenting a different methodology of learning and transmitting knowledge, based on sharing information,  questions,  doubts, and resolving them together by experimenting.

This project has been successfully implemented in the Region of Castilla La Mancha and Madrid involving 50 enthusiastic teachers,  around 1200 youngsters who were able to invent, create and exhibit their project made with Arduino.

See the video below for details (in spanish):

Thanks to the support of Fundación La Caixa, the same program will be held in 50 colleges of Barcelona and a new edition, with the renewed support of Fundación Telefónica, will begin again in Madrid in 2015.

A low-cost robotic hand (tutorial) mirroring your own fingers

via Arduino Blog

roboticHand

Marco Pucci shared on our Facebook Page a link to the tutorial he made for a low-cost Robotic Hand able to mirror the movement of our own hand. He created it  in the laboratory of new technology of Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera (“Academy of fine arts of Brera”), a state-run public academy in Milan, Italy.

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The hand works with flex sensors attached to the glove’s fingers, they are analysed by an Arduino which then moves servo motors connected to threads attached to the robotic hand.

You can follow the tutorial (in italian, but you can use google translate) on this page www.marcopucci.it/arduino/ , download a zip with all the sketches, and watch a demo video below:

 

Share hyperlocal air pollution data with Sensing Umbrella

via Arduino Blog

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The Sensing Umbrella is the second project I’m featuring on this blog (see the first), coming out of the class at  the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design called Connected Objects, with Massimo Banzi and Giorgio Olivero. 

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The project created by a team of students Akarsh Sanghi, Saurabh Datta and Simon Herzog is a platform to gather, display, and share hyperlocal air pollution data:

Each umbrella serves as a node for measuring CO and NO2 pollution levels and can provide exceptionally granular data to pollution databases and for scientific analysis. Simultaneously, the light visualisations inside the umbrella respond to pollution levels in real time and spread awareness of air quality in the city for its inhabitants. The umbrella uses open hardware and software to gather and interpret data through a built-in sensor array, displays CO and NO2 pollution locally in two modes, and logs the timestamped and geolocated data to the cloud for analysis.

Check the video to watch the team introducing the project:

DIY Pulsoximeter developed with two Arduino

via Arduino Blog

pulseoximeter

Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive method for monitoring if a patient’s oxygenation is unstable and Arduino user die_Diode sent us his version of a DIY Pulsoximter developed with two Arduino:

Arduino Mega for the oximetry electronics and Arduino Uno for the graph.
The electronics includes LED Driver, Photo current transformation, patient-dependent calibration LED, Active filters, Nellcor SpO2 sensor. Adafruit OLED displays Vitalparamter. Noritake VFD display GUU-100 shows the PPG. The boards are connected to the electronics with a Protoshield.

Spraying natural fibers to build cotton-candy surfaces

via Arduino Blog

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During Fab10- Fab Festival in Barcelona I met Jin Shihui who introduced me to CandyProject, a research project exploring the process of spraying natural fiber to create a non-woven textile that can be used to produce anything from building components to ornamental artifacts.

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By means of air pressure we separate the fibers from a roving allowing them to self-organize and reassemble due to the surface tension caused by a fine mist of adhesive. This creates a controlled fibrous aggregation producing an emergent morphospace encompassing the initial substructure.

The robot Jin is holding in her hands in the picture above uses air pressure to separate fibers into individual strands. While the fibers are still separated they are embedded with an adhesive spray and all parameters are controlled within the robot  with an Arduino Uno:

Designing an end effector for the robot to precisely spray the fibers allowed us to predefine the spraying protocol of any object, while also modifying the material properties at each of its parts. Varying degrees of material density, thickness, and rigidity could be achieved by simply adjusting certain parameters in the spraying process while always insuring repeatability and precision. Controlling these properties, coupled with the environmental and thermal nature of the fibers used, opens up a wide range of possible applications ranging from optimized building envelopes to furniture and custom made fashion. We want to share details of our project  so everyone can  build your own spraying tool and develop your usage with this technic.

Take a look at the video below showing the whole amazing process from growing to spraying the fibers:

Some other pictures of the project developed by a team composed by Jin Shihui, Ali Yerdel, Jean Akanish, and Alexander Dolan, during the Master in Advanced Architecture in 2012-13 at IAAC, Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia:

Kuka at work Kuka at work Demo area at Fab 10 Candy Tool with Arduino 1 -

 

A breathing plant installation creating unusual sensations

via Arduino Blog

uncanny - breathing plant

Arduino community on Gplus is pretty active and many people share their experiments, projects and prototypes to receive comments and tips. Yongho Jeong from Seul (South Korea) published a video called Uncanny, a breathing plant installation creating unusual sensations and made with Arduino Uno + air pump:

The uncanny (German: Das Unheimliche, “the opposite of what is familiar”) is a Freudian concept of an instance where something can be both familiar yet alien at the same time, resulting in a feeling of it being uncomfortably strange.  //
The subject of this project is interaction between human and plant. My First thought is that Do plants breathe like we human do? I was amazed after learning that plants breathe and that their breathing is very similar to ours. So I want to show that plants breaths llike human do and reacting to touch of human.

Watch the plant in action below and explore Jeong blog  for the other technical details.

 

A DIY water-saving device for your house or makerspace

via Arduino Blog

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Last June Thomas Amberg participated to Water Hackathon – Open Source Technologies for Rivers, Oceans and Lakes taking place in Lausanne. He came up with a DIY solution made with Arduino Uno and a flow sensor to help monitor how much water a tub consumes.

The Augmented Water device helps you save water by turning red after one Liter and helping you not to waste it unnecessarily.
The ingredients you need to reach the results are the following: an Arduino Uno, Adafruit Neopixels, Flow sensor, LiPo battery, LiPo charger, jumper wires, tube fitting the sensor, plastic test tube and some zip ties. You can easily make one in 6 steps with his tutorial on Instructables.
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The world knows what you did last summer

via Arduino Blog

i know what you did last summer
Jaap de Maat shared with us his final year project called I know what you did last summer, the finale to a two-year-long MA in Information Experience Design of the Royal College of Art. The ingredients are  simple (an old electric wheel chair, an Arduino Mega, 12v motor board, Bluetooth slave, wires, blood sweat and tears) and the concept is very actual:

It is physically impossible for the human brain to remember every event from our past in full detail. The default setting is to forget and our memories are constructed based on our current values. In the digital age it has become easier to look back with great accuracy. But this development contains hidden dangers, as those stored recollections can easily be misinterpreted and manipulated. That sobering thought should rule our online behaviour, because the traces we leave behind now will follow us around for ever.

inside of the installation

The video of the installation shows how the physical presence of an archive drawer  stalking has a real impact on visitors:

Here’s the making of the prototype:

Node.js on the Arduino Yún via the Bridge library

via Arduino Blog

ArduinoYun

Tom Igoe some days ago wrote an interesting post about Arduino Yún on his blog.  We post it here as it could be useful to the Arduino Community.

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Recently, Federico Fissore added node.js to the package repository for the Arduino Yún. Here’s how you get node to communicate with the Arduino processor on the Yún via the Bridge library.

To do this, you’ll need an Arduino Yún, a microSD card, a microUSB cable and a wifi connection. You should be familiar with the basics of the Arduino Yún and node.js in order to get the most out of this post.

All of the code for this post can be found on my GitHub repository.

First you’ll need to install node on the Yún. Make sure you’ve upgraded to the current Yún software image and have connected to the internet via wifi. Then ssh into your Yún, or connect to the command line interface using the the YunSerialTerminal sketch, and issue the following commands:


$ opkg update
$ opkg install node

That’s it. Now you have node.js onboard. You can check that it’s okay by checking the version:

$ node -v

You should get the version number in reply.

Once you’ve got that working, you’ll undoubtedly want to communicate with the Yún’s Arduino processor from node. You can do this using the Bridge library. On a microSD drive, make a directory for your node scripts. I called mine /arduino/node. Then insert it into your Yún. For reference, its path from the command line is /mnt/sda1/arduino/node.

Note: The Yún automatically treats the microSD card’s /arduino/www/ directory as a public web directory. Anything you put in there will be served out as static HTML. So you may not want to put your node scripts in this directory, so they’re not visible via the browser. That’s why I created a node directory at the same level as the www directory, but outside it.

Read the complete post at this link>>

The Funky Chicken

via Arduino Blog

Funky Chicken
The Funky Chicken was created during a series of workshops that were given as part of the larger project “Interactive Sensory Objects Designed for and by People with Learning Disabilities”:

It was designed by Rumena, a student from the Reading College LLD/D course (people with learning disabilities) who attended the workshops on a regular basis. She made the papier mache chicken, painted it and added the frills and ornaments, and wanted it to sit inside a basket but flap it’s wings and cluck. We helped her to complete this artwork by adding the necessary electronics including an Arduino Uno, Adafruit Waveshield, speaker and a servo to make the wings flap.

The whole flapping/clucking of the chicken is triggered using a sonar attached to Arduino Uno. Moving within 1m of the chicken will trigger it:

 In the image below the sonar is hooked up to the Arduino Uno, and the Arduino is connected to the servo controller (not shown). The sonar is a very inexpensive off-the-shelf HC-SR04, which has a range of about 3m.

Funky Chicken

Here’s the video with the chicken at work:

 

Freefall camera: an autonomous skydiving robot

via Arduino Blog

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A group of skydivers and engineers, combined their passions to create the world’s first autonomous skydiving robot, equipped by a camera and controlled by Arduino Mega.

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The Freefall Camera is a student project at the University of Nottingham, its team is composed by David Alatorre, Tom Dryden, Tom Shorten and Peter Storey who received the third prize at the Student Venture Challenge from the Haydn Green Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

Their robot freefall camera is already in testing phase and the team features in a number of videos created by the University’s Nottingham Science YouTube channel.

Take a look at the video below explaining how they used Arduino Mega and enjoy the whole playlist at this link.

Two new little tools for your tinkering time with Arduino

via Arduino Blog

Two new Arduino products are available starting today from the Arduino Store. Read below for details!

Arduino USB Host Shield

ArduinoHostShield

This shield allows you to connect devices to your Arduino using a USB port, for example game controllers, digital cameras, phones, keyboards, etc:

- it is based on the MAX3421E, which is a USB peripheral/host controller containing the digital logic and analog circuitry necessary to implement a full-speed USB peripheral or a full-/low-speed host compliant to USB specification rev 2.0.

- it can be used with the “USB Host Library for Arduino” hosted by Oleg Mazurov and Alexei Glushchenko from circuits@home, Kristian Lauszus and Andrew Kroll on GitHub (click to download zip).

If you want to see how to use it, take a look at this tutorial from Officine Arduino which used it to add wireless to an RC Car.

Buy USB Host Shield now

 

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ArduinoISP

ArduinoISP

It’s a tiny AVR-ISP (in-system programmer) based on David Mellis’ project FabISP and useful to anyone needing more space on the Arduino board. Uploading a sketch with an external programmer can be used for three main reasons:

- remove the bootloader and use the extra space for your sketch

- burn the bootloader on your Arduino, so you can recover it if you accidentally corrupt the bootloader.

- when you use a new ATmega microcontroller in your Arduino, and you need the bootloader in order to upload a sketch in the usual way.

For more details about using the Arduino ISP please visit the Getting Started page

Learn how to program an ATtiny and to read your Arduino built-in EEPROM using ArduinoISP in the tutorials on Scuola.

Buy Arduino ISP now