Tag Archives: arduino

Tsunami: the easiest way to get started with analog signals

via Arduino Blog

tsunami-angle_jpg_project-body

We are happy to announce Tsunami by Arachnid Labs has joined the Arduino At Heart Program.

Tsunami is a new powerful and flexible signal generator built on the Arduino platform and the best way to get started experimenting with analog signals.

Nick Johnson, its creator, took the versatile processor behind the Arduino Leonardo, and combined it with a Direct Digital Synthesis chip, which makes generating analog signals incredibly straightforward. He also added flexible input and output circuitry, an easy to use software library, to make working with analog signals as easy as blinking an LED.

Tsunami lowers the barriers to making music, sending and receiving data, experimenting amateur radio, and creating educational applications. It was launched successfully on KickStarter last April and you are in time to pre-order it on Crowd Supply!

Here’s a list of projects you could do:

  •  Use it as a building block for a synthesizer
  • Measure unknown signals
  • Measure the response curve of your audio amplifier
  • Implement an APRS modem
  • Generate precise clocks for other devices
  • Make a digital theremin
  • Read and write data tapes from classic computers (Commodore, Atari, etc)
  • Test filters and reactive components (capacitors, inductors, and so forth)
  • Encode and decode your own data for audio transmission
  • Teach yourself about Direct Digital Synthesis
  • Teach yourself about AC and complex impedance
  • Make your own low frequency radio transmitter

Want to know more? Meet Nick and Tsunami in this video:

 

tsunami-features_png_project-body

DJ sets get more interactive with Cubled and Arduino

via Arduino Blog

cubled01

Cubled is an interactive installation made of 27 luminous spheres arranged in space to create a cube 5 mt (16.4ft) per side floating on a stage.

The project created by Giuseppe Acito of Opificio Sonico  has a structure made of steel wires, RGB LED Strips and Ikea paper lanterns.

cublet03

The system is MIDI-controlled, the notes generated by a sequencer are converted to electric signals using an Arduino UNO and a Mosfet:

No DMX device was used for this system which is 12V DC powered, with slim electric wires in order to give the lightness needed to this installation. In this clip, the performance is splitted in 2 parts: in the first a kit of electronic percussion is “played” live by a step sequencer named Sonic Fraction Beatdown (a MaxMSP device for Ableton Live), the combinations of 12 MIDI notes generated are linked to the spheres. In the second part the combinations of sounds and lights are pre-programmed patterns clip and performed live by a Tenori-on Yamaha and Ableton Live. The installation was mounted inside the Link Club (Bologna – Italy) in December 2013, which hosted some world-famous DJ set, during a month of permanence.

cubled02

 

The Arduino Experience at Computer History Museum

via Arduino Blog

First useable prototype. Still called "Wiring Lite", used as a low cost module for wiring users. David Cuartielles joined at this point (the flying resistor is his first contribution to the design) from this point on the project becomes Arduino

Thursday May 28th at noon The Computer History Museum is hosting an open lecture by Massimo Banzi, co-founder of the Arduino project. He will cover the historical origins of Arduino, including discussion of the process of designing tools which make digital technology accessible to people who are not experts, and the essential role of the larger Arduino ecosystem that supports this remarkable computer platform.

The Computer History Museum, located in Mountain View (California), is a nonprofit organization  exploring the history of computing and its ongoing impact on society in the last 40 years. The Museum is dedicated to the preservation and celebration of computer history, it hosts the largest international collection of computing artifacts in the world and many virtual exhibition you can explore directly online.

If you like vintage images and history of computing, check the “visible storage” collection below.

visibleStorage

 

 

The main image of this post is a picture by Massimo Banzi showing the first useable Arduino prototype. Still called “Wiring Lite”, used as a low cost module for wiring users. David Cuartielles joined at this point (the flying resistor is his first contribution to the design) from this point on the project becomes Arduino. 

 

Keep your candies safe with Candy Locker and Intel Edison

via Arduino Blog

CandyLocker
Candy Locker is a mouth-watering tutorial based on  Intel® Edison and image recognition of objects.
You can keep your candies safe from greedy hands with this color recognition lock and a dispenser using a set of 5 distinct color images and setting up a pattern that will activate and dispense candies.

Follow the link and open the magic door of the video and picture recognition,  invent cool systems learning how to manage object recognition and OpenCv foundations.

Step2

 

The state of Arduino: a new sister brand announced

via Arduino Blog

massimoBayarea

The room was packed and carefully listening to Massimo’s keynote about latest development at Arduino during Maker Faire Bay Area 2015. Starting from core values of Arduino, its community and showing the work Arduino team is doing to bring benefits to it: it’s about creating open protocols, bridges and connections, to give more options to makers and allow them to port projects on what platform is more effective for the development of their ideas.

 

Arduino community is at the center of his message. It’s amazing how it has been growing a lot in the last 10 years and the impact of traffic and downloads of Arduino IDE gives us an idea of the importance of Arduino in the maker community.

ArduinoCommunity

In the last year more than 21.5 million visitors landed on Arduino.cc website and 65% were returning visitors with an average session of 6 minutes. An Arduino IDE is downloaded every 4.5 seconds and since March 10th we reached almost 1.4 million downloads.

That’s why Arduino is not only about boards. Arduino approach goes beyond hardware and commits to providing makers with a whole greater experience in creating projects and trying to improve the way people build with Arduino and other compatible boards.

arduinoExperience

This approach is represented in the improvement recently brought to the Arduino IDE but also developing web-based tools. That’s what goes especially into the new Arduino Create, now available in private beta. Massimo referred to it as the “Arduino Operating system”, because now makers can run Arduino on a bunch of different operating systems, frameworks, libraries, and translate a prototype into a finished product in a much easier way.

Going back to hardware, the moment arrived to give some news about where to buy Arduino.cc boards. After the announcement of the strategic manufacturing partnership with Adafruit for the US Market the audience burst into warm applause. Massimo then announced Arduino started a series of other partnerships to manufacture boards locally all over the world and make them available as soon as possible to makers and distributors.

YunShield

At the beginning of July Arduino will celebrate Independence day as a bunch of classic Arduino and new boards will be available from Arduino stores and some distributors with the classic Arduino.cc brand in the US market and going into details with dates:

Arduino WiFi Shield 101 from the 25th of June

–  Arduino Yún Shield available from the 25th of June – Adding Arduino Yún capabilities to any Arduino.

Arduino Zero available from the 9th of July

At the end of the keynote Massimo spent a few words regarding the European and rest of the world market, introducing to the audience a new sister brand. Now we all can say: welcome Genuino!

It is a play on the Italian word genuino that in english means genuine/authentic and will allow Arduino team to keep promoting a common approach within the open hardware and open source community providing genuine boards to all makers outside of the US.

 

genuinobrand

 

Students bring new ideas and innovation at CTC Castilla

via Arduino Blog

ctc2

Creative Technologies in the Classroom* gives us a lot of joy whenever we visit students’ fairs. Each iteration of CTC (Madrid, Castilla, Barcelona and so forth) has its own technology fair and it is meant to award and congregate students and their projects. Arduino Verkstad, teachers, school and government representatives join as well to celebrate and share what students have learned along the program.

This year is the third edition of CTC Castilla and the fair had 140 projects, 936 students and 70 teachers. We have noticed that:

  • Teachers learned along with the students since they are not reproducing the CTC projects as the final projects, they have innovating by bringing new ideas
  • We got told that teachers are forced by the students to open the labs late after school hours because they want to spend more time working on their projects
  • Students have become pretty good at pitching projects, not only their production is excellent, but also their presentation skills

Some of the most impressive projects are:

robotic hand controlled from a phone that even had an app with the sign language alphabet so that the hand would “talk” for you, and an R2D2 made of recycled materials. All the pictures and many videos of the projects can be seen here. Thanks to Centro Regional de Formación del Profesorado, Castilla La Mancha and congratulations to all CTC participants!

*Creative Technologies in the Classroom (CTC) is a collection of experiments aimed at transforming the way technology is taught in schools around the world. These experiments introduce basic concepts in programming, electronics, and mechanics.

(The news was originally posted on Arduino Verkstad blog by Laura Balboa)

Manipulate your voice with Mimic Monster and Intel Edison

via Arduino Blog

Monster_post2

It’s time to introduce you to another great tutorial made for  Intel Edison.  Mimic Monster is a project allowing you to record soundbites and playing them back manipulated.
In this step-by-step project, everyone who is interested in audio features and mods , can find useful information on how to manipulate audio files and create amazing effects from your voice.

Grawr! It’s a mimic monster! What did you say? Grawr! It’s the mimic monster!

Having landed on Earth, this little alien needs you to teach it how to speak. Speak into its audio antenna and it will repeat your words back. Press a button and change its pitch. In this tutorial, you will learn in more detail, how to work with a USB sound card, a microphone, and a speaker.


Before you begin, make sure you’ve followed through Intel® Edison Getting Started guide, and our previous tutorial, the Intel® Edison mini-breakout Getting Started Guide.

Monster_post1

 Check the other tutorials of the series.

Arduino Announces Manufacturing Partnership with Adafruit

via Arduino Blog

ArduinoAdafruit
Today, May 16th, 2015 Massimo Banzi, CEO and co-founder of Arduino, announced at Maker Faire during the “State of Arduino” keynote that Adafruit is manufacturing Arduino’s for Arduino.cc in New York, New York, USA! 

Limor “Ladyada” Fried said:

“Adafruit and Arduino.cc have been working together on open-source software and hardware for almost 10 years in a variety of ways, this is expanded partnership and manufacturing is part of our collective goal to make the world a better place through the sharing of ideas, code and hardware with our communities –

We’re currently manufacturing the Arduino  Gemma with Arduino.cc right here in New York City at the Adafruit factory, it instantly became a top seller and we’re looking forward to bringing our manufacturing expertise and processes to start shipping Arduinos right here from the USA as soon as possible!”

Take a look at this video interview of Massimo by Make directly from Maker Faire Bay Area and containing other important announcements:

Ultrasonic 3D Radar.

via coolarduino

This page is next level of Virtual Touch Screen project. 

Technically, there are two hardware parts were added, to fully demonstrate extra ordinary sensitivity of the VTS project. First one is the BlueTooth module. And second is a tablet, running android. Device that I have, doesn’t support USB host mode (OTG), otherwise I may be fine w/o BT, just transfer a data over USB cable, as it was done in two previous demo video clips.  Have to say, it was not easy to represent 3D perspective on a flat screen, and picture below shows what I designed to complete a task:

android

Don’t think it requires a comments, the tricky part was to create an elliptical grid to show a distance. The number of circles is not limited to 2, I’d think about how to film next demo video, that ‘d show a “volume”.

Enjoy the movie:

 

 


Teaching (Teaching with LilyPad, Raspberry Pi in education, MzTEK)

via OSHUG

The thirty-fourth OSHUG meeting will feature three talks that each explore approaches to teaching electronics and programming.

Teaching with the LilyPad Arduino

In this talk we will hear about experiences of teaching basic electronics and coding principles via wearable technology and e-textiles, using the LilyPad Arduino — a sewable microcontroller — in workshops with people of all ages at universities, schools at hackspaces.

Rain Ashford designs and constructs wearable technology, e-textiles and interactive artworks. A PhD candidate at Goldsmiths, where she is investigating the possibility that wearable technology can be used to augment new forms of non-verbal communication, particularly in the areas of body language and emotion, by the amplifying and visualising of physiological data. She has studied Fine Art, Multimedia, and Electronics Engineering, which has led to her work developing as a convergence of art, programming and electronics.

Raspberry Pi in education

Challenges, benefits and experiences with the Raspberry Pi as an educational tool.

Matt Venn has run hundreds of creative science workshops for thousands of children and adults around the world. For the last year, he has been working with teachers in preparation for the computer science curriculum changes; creating and leading courses, workshops and projects.

When he's not inventing new ways of getting people excited about science, Matthew plays music, invents puzzle boxes, practices martial arts and maintains bikes.

MzTEK: festivals, workshops and take away technologies

MzTEK is a non-profit organisation that aims to redress the imbalance of women artists working in the fields of new media, computer arts, electronics and technology. Based in London and supported by Hackney arts institution [ space ], and Centre for Creative Collaboration in Kings Cross, and hosting a range of workshops, talks and self-initiated tinker sessions.

In collaboration with partner organisations, MzTEK develop interesting, accessible and curiosity igniting workshops that can be delivered in short time frames and engage a wide audience with varying skills. Working with open source technologies and tools to help ensure that participants continue making and tinkering with the technologies they encounter long after workshops. Furthermore, doing this at festivals and events where the hope is to encounter a broad range of participants and unpredictable work environments! This talk will discuss some previous projects such as the Hacked Human Orchestra, a wearable electronics project devised in collaboration with Guerrilla Science, and suggest ways that thematic focus, together with a well balanced combination of skill acquisition, creativity and fun can enhance workshop delivery.

Shauna Concannon is an interdisciplinary researcher interested in communication spaces and constructive disagreement. She has been working with MzTEK for the past few years, developing and facilitating workshops in Processing, Arduino and wearable electronics. She is currently undertaking a PhD in Media and Arts Technology at Queen Mary University of London.

Note: Please aim to by 18:15 as the first talk will start at 18:30 prompt.

Sponsored by:

Products (Nanode, An Industry Perspective, Licensing Update)

via OSHUG

Coming up for a year ago, at OSHUG #16, we heard three first-hand experiences of developing open source hardware designs into finished products. At the twenty-third meeting we'll further explore this topic through reflections on the Nanode project as it approaches its second anniversary, and an industry perspective on developing open source hardware. There will also be an update on developments in open source hardware licensing, a subject that was explored at the second OSHUG meeting back in May 2010.

As Nanode Approaches Two

With the second anniversary of the Nanode project approaching and in excess of 2,500 sold worldwide, this talk looks at the initial aims, commercialisation and spin-offs as a typical open source hardware design. Exploring the concept, start-up phase and challenge of maintaining momentum in a constantly evolving open source marketplace.

Ken Boak has worked in electronics hardware design for 25 years. Initially with BBC Research Department where Ken worked on early HDTV digital picture processing systems. In 1998 Ken embarked on ten years in telecommunications and volume product production in the Far East. Recently Ken has worked on scientific and educational instruments, and open source systems both in the UK and USA.

Open Source Hardware Licensing Update

It's been a busy time in open source hardware licensing - CERN's Open Hardware Licence has been undergoing a lot of work behind the scenes, and a new version is about to be released. There are rumours of a new version of the TAPR Open Hardware licence, and the debate between copyleft and academic licences rages on. Andrew Katz has been involved of all of these activities and will provide an update on the current state of licensing, and some pointers on the best licence to adopt.

Andrew Katz is a partner at boutique law firm Moorcrofts LLP in the Thames Valley. He specialises in IT/IP work, and in particular advises clients on licensing and liability issues around open source software.He was involved in drafting both GPL3 and the England and Wales version of the Creative Commons licence as well as all major open hardware licences. Many years ago, he designed and built a Z80 SS50 bus-based computer system, created a lightweight version of the Citroen Dyane, mainly by ripping it body off, and hacked together an air compressor from bits and pieces found in a scrapyard. He is currently part-time interim COO of the Maria DB foundation.

Developing Open Source Hardware: an Industry Perspective

RS Components have developed a new platform for which the hardware design will be published under an open source licence. This talk will provide an overview of this exciting new development and provide an insight into the motivations for making the design freely available to all. The product development and manufacturing process will also be covered in brief along with some of the challenges experienced, and the broader project goals and ongoing commitment to the open source community.

Mike Brojak is responsible at RS Components for the development of free resources for electronics engineers, and believes in helping engineers to be more productive in order to achieve their highest potential. His technical background is in hardware and software for embedded systems, primarily for mobile automation control. He has an Electronics Systems Design degree from Oxford Brookes University.

Note: Please aim to arrive for 18:00 - 18:20 as the event will start at 18:30 prompt.

Sponsored by:

Extended list of 8-bit AVR Micro-Controllers, easily programmable with the Arduino IDE

via Wolf Paulus » Embedded

A couple days back, I wrote about ‘The $3 Arduino‘, how to leave the Arduino board behind and program an ATmega168 Micro-Controller directly, still using the Arduino IDE but with the AVRMSPII programmer. Of course, the ATmega168 isn’t the only MC available for something like that. In fact, I have quite a few 8-bit AVR Micro-Controllers in a small box right here, next to my desk.
Let’s minimize the ‘Minimal Arduino’ even more, for instance by using the tiny ATtiny85 Microcontroller. Just like we did with the ‘BareBones’ definition, we add board definitions for the Mircocontrollers that the Arduino IDE doesn’t support out-of-the-box. Board definition for the missing MCs can be found here and after moving the attiny folder into the ~/Document/Arduino/hardware folder and restartig the Arduino IDE, the IDE should now know about the new MCs. More details about this can be read here.

Minimizing the Minimal Arduino

Now that the Arduino IDE knows about the really tiny ATtiny85, we can set it’s internal clock to 8Mhz and flash a small program.


To flash the chip, we use the SPI (MOSI/MISO/SCK) Pins like shown here:

  1. RSET -> ATtiny85-Pin 1
  2. GND -> ATtiny85-Pin 4
  3. MOSI -> ATtiny85-Pin 5
  4. MISO -> ATtiny85-Pin 6
  5. SCK -> ATtiny85-Pin 7
  6. +5V -> ATtiny85-Pin 8

Switching the Internal Clock to 8MHz

Using the Fuse Calculator we can find the proper ATtiny85 fuse settings, to use the internal RC Oscillator and setting it to 8Mhz.
The avrdude arguments look something like this: -U lfuse:w:0xe2:m -U hfuse:w:0xdf:m -U efuse:w:0xff:m
Avrdude is one of the tools that the Arduino IDE deploys on your computer. You can either execute Avrdude with those arguments directly, like so:

avrdude -p t85 -b 115200 -P usb -c avrispmkII -V -e -U lfuse:w:0xe2:m -U hfuse:w:0xdf:m -U efuse:w:0xff:m

or just execute the ‘Burn Bootloader’ command in the Arduino IDE’s Tools menu.
While this will NOT burn a bootloader on the ATtiny85 chip, it will set the fuses appropriately. Either way, this step needs to be performed only once.

With the microcontroller still connected to the AT-AVR-ISP2 programmer, a simple program can be quickly uploaded:

int p = 3;                // LED connected to digital pin 13
void setup() {
  pinMode(p, OUTPUT);      // sets the digital pin as output
}

void loop() {
  digitalWrite(p, HIGH);   // sets the LED on
  delay(100);              // .. for 10th of a sec
  digitalWrite(p, LOW);    // sets the LED off again
  delay(1000);             //  waits for a second
  digitalWrite(p, HIGH);   // sets the LED on
  delay(500);              // .. for 1/2 a sec
  digitalWrite(p, LOW);    // sets the LED off again
  delay(500);              // .. for 1/2 a second
}

ATtiny2313 ($2.00)

The high-performance, low-power Atmel 8-bit AVR RISC-based microcontroller combines 2KB ISP flash memory, 128B ISP EEPROM, 128B internal SRAM, universal serial interface (USI), full duplex UART, and debugWIRE for on-chip debugging. The device supports a throughput of 20 MIPS at 20 MHz and operates between 2.7-5.5 volts.
By executing powerful instructions in a single clock cycle, the device achieves throughputs approaching 1 MIPS per MHz, balancing power consumption and processing speed.

ATtiny84 ($3.00)

The high-performance, low-power Atmel 8-bit AVR RISC-based microcontroller combines 8KB ISP flash memory, 512B EEPROM, 512-Byte SRAM, 12 general purpose I/O lines, 32 general purpose working registers, an 2 timers/counters (8-bit/16-bit) with two PWM channels each, internal and external interrupts, 8-channel 10-bit A/D converter, programmable gain stage (1x, 20x) for 12 differential ADC channel pairs, programmable watchdog timer with internal oscillator, internal calibrated oscillator, and four software selectable power saving modes.

ATtiny85 ($1.00)

The high-performance, low-power Atmel 8-bit AVR RISC-based microcontroller combines 8KB ISP flash memory, 512B EEPROM, 512-Byte SRAM, 6 general purpose I/O lines, 32 general purpose working registers, one 8-bit timer/counter with compare modes, one 8-bit high speed timer/counter, USI, internal and external Interrupts, 4-channel 10-bit A/D converter, programmable watchdog timer with internal oscillator, three software selectable power saving modes, and debugWIRE for on-chip debugging. The device achieves a throughput of 20 MIPS at 20 MHz and operates between 2.7-5.5 volts.

ATmega8 ($2.00)

The low-power Atmel 8-bit AVR RISC-based microcontroller combines 8KB of programmable flash memory, 1KB of SRAM, 512K EEPROM, and a 6 or 8 channel 10-bit A/D converter. The device supports throughput of 16 MIPS at 16 MHz and operates between 2.7-5.5 volts.

ATmega168 ($4.00)

The high-performance, low-power Atmel 8-bit AVR RISC-based microcontroller combines 16KB ISP flash memory, 1KB SRAM, 512B EEPROM, an 8-channel/10-bit A/D converter (TQFP and QFN/MLF), and debugWIRE for on-chip debugging. The device supports a throughput of 20 MIPS at 20 MHz and operates between 2.7-5.5 volts.

ATmeaga328 ($5.00)

The high-performance Atmel 8-bit AVR RISC-based microcontroller combines 32KB ISP flash memory with read-while-write capabilities, 1KB EEPROM, 2KB SRAM, 23 general purpose I/O lines, 32 general purpose working registers, three flexible timer/counters with compare modes, internal and external interrupts,serial programmable USART, a byte-oriented 2-wire serial interface, SPI serial port, 6-channel 10-bit A/D converter (8-channels in TQFP and QFN/MLF packages), programmable watchdog timer with internal oscillator, and five software selectable power saving modes. The device operates between 1.8-5.5 volts.

MC Flash (KB) SRAM (Bytes) EEPROM (Byte) SPI I2C UART ADC Chnnl (10bit) PWM Chnnl Timer RTC
ATtiny2312 2 128 128 2 1 1 4 2 No
ATtiny84 8 512 512 1 1 0 8 4 2 No
ATtiny85 8 512 512 1 1 0 4 6 2 No
ATmega8 8 1024 512 1 1 1 8 3 3 Yes
ATmega168 16 1024 512 2 1 1 8 6 3 Yes
ATmega328 32 2048 1024 2 1 1 8 6 3 Yes

The $3 Arduino

via Wolf Paulus » Embedded

Buying and using an official Arduino Board like the standard Arduino Uno is the perfect way to get started with the Arduino language, common electronic components, or your own embedded prototyping project. However, once you have mastered the initial challenges and have built some projects, the Arduino Board can get in the way.

For instance, many enthusiasts, who started out with hacking and extending the Arduino hardware and software, have now moved on to the Raspberry Pi, which is equally or even less expensive, but more powerful and complete. The Raspberry Pi comes with Ethernet, USB, HDMI, Analog-Audio-Out, a lot of memory, and much more; adding all these capabilities to the Arduino with Arduino-Shields, would probably cost several hundred Dollars. However, the Raspberry lacks some of Arduino’s I/O capabilities like Analog-Inputs.
Combining an Arduino with a Raspberry Pi, may make sense for a lot of project; but we don’t need or want to integrate an Arduino Board – the Arduino’s core, the ATMEGA Microcontroller, is all what’s needed.

We still want to program the Arduino with the familiar Arduino IDE, but the boot-loader doesn’t really help, once the ATMEGA Micro is programmed and is ready to communicate with the Raspi or any other platform.

This is probably the most minimal ATmega168-20PU based Arduino you can come up with. The ATmega168 (available of about $3) was the default Arduino chip for quite some time, before being replaced by the ATmega328, doubling the available memory. The chip is powered with +5V on Pin-7 and grounded via Pin-8; the LED is between Pins 19 and 22.

Here you see it processing this rather simple blinky program:

int p = 13;                // LED connected to digital pin 13
void setup() {
  pinMode(p, OUTPUT);      // sets the digital pin as output
}
  
void loop() {
  digitalWrite(p, HIGH);   // sets the LED on
  delay(100);              // .. for 10th of a sec 
  digitalWrite(p, LOW);    // sets the LED off again
  delay(1000);             //  waits for a second
  digitalWrite(p, HIGH);   // sets the LED on
  delay(500);              // .. for 1/2 a sec 
  digitalWrite(p, LOW);    // sets the LED off again
  delay(500);              // .. for 1/2 a second
}

Since we don’t want any bootloader (waiting for a serial upload of new software) on this chip but rather have it immediately start executing the program, we need to tell the Arduino IDE about our bare-bones board and the fact that it doesn’t have a boot loader.

Bare-Bones ATmega168 Board Definition

To add a new hardware definition to the Arduino IDE, create a hardware/BareBones folder inside your Arduino folder (the place where all your sketches are stored). Create a boards.txt file with the following content.
On the Mac for instance, I ended up with this:
/Users/wolf/Documents/Arduino/hardware/BareBones/boards.txt

minimal168.name=ATmega168 bare bone (internal 8 MHz clock)
minimal168.upload.speed=115200
minimal168.bootloader.low_fuses=0xE2
minimal168.bootloader.high_fuses=0xDD
minimal168.bootloader.extended_fuses=0×00
minimal168.upload.maximum_size=16384
minimal168.build.mcu=atmega168
minimal168.build.f_cpu=8000000L
minimal168.build.core=arduino:arduino
minimal168.build.variant=arduino:standard

Wiring up the ATmega-168

To flash the chip, we use the SPI (MOSI/MISO/SCK) Pins like shown here:

Connections from an AT-AVR-ISP2 to the ATmega-168 are as follows:

  1. GND -> ATmega168-Pin 8
  2. +5V -> ATmega168-Pin 7
  3. MISO -> ATmega168-Pin 18
  4. SCK -> ATmega168-Pin 19
  5. RSET -> ATmega168-Pin 1
  6. MOSI -> ATmega168-Pin 17

Burning without a Boot-Loader

Instead of an Arduino Board, I connected one of those shiny blue AT-AVR-ISP2 programmers from ATMEL (available for about $30) to the Mac. In the Arduino-IDE, in the Tools Menu, under Boards, I selected and ‘ATmega168 bare bone (internal 8 MHz clock)’ and under Programmers, ‘AVRISP mkII’.
Hitting ‘Upload’ will now use the AT-AVR-ISP2 to reset the chip, flash the program, and verify the new memory content. All in all, it takes about 75 seconds.
Once the chip is now powered, it will immediately start executing the program.

Switching the Internal Clock to 8MHz

Using the Fuse Calculator we can find the proper ATmega168 fuse settings, to use the internal RC Oscillator and setting it to 8Mhz.
The avrdude arguments look something like this: -U lfuse:w:0xe2:m -U hfuse:w:0xdf:m -U efuse:w:0x00:m.
Avrdude is one of the tools that the Arduino IDE deploys on your computer. You can either execute Avrdude with those arguments directly, like so:

avrdude -p m168 -b 115200 -P usb -c avrispmkII -V -e -U lfuse:w:0xe2:m -U hfuse:w:0xdf:m -U efuse:w:0x00:m

or just execute the ‘Burn Bootloader’ command in the Arduino IDE’s Tools menu.
While this will NOT burn a bootloader on the ATmege168 chip, it will set the fuses appropriately. Either way, this step needs to be performed only once.

ATtiny85

Let’s minimize the ‘Minimal Arduino’ even more, for instance by using the tiny ATtiny85 Microcontroller.
Read more: http://wolfpaulus.com/journal/embedded/avrmc

Kits (Homesense, Quick2Wire)

via OSHUG

For those that are new to hardware development it can prove a daunting prospect, and kits that address the needs of those with little or no experience in this area have a vital role to play. At the nineteenth OSHUG meeting we will be hearing about two such kits, one that was designed to support user-led smart home innovation and that was based around the Arduino platform, and an experimenters kit for the Raspberry Pi that is currently in development.

The Homesense Project

The Homesense project was a European user-led, smart-home development project employing open source hardware. The project was led by Tinker London and EDF and engaged households supported by local experts in the design and development of smart home concepts.

The project was developed as a reaction to top-down design approaches commonly observed in technological development and home building. Most early research viewed smart homes as a single complex system that is designed and constructed from the ground up, and assumes that most aspects (physical building, digital infrastructure, furniture, appliances) are under the control of a single smart-home developer. (Kortuem et al. 2010)

In the contrasting reality however of multi-vendor development and retrofitting this is rarely the case. Inspired also by an argument that smart homes are developed by experts in a top down approach subsequently living with a smart home is acknowledged to be problematic to non-experts who lack control over respective technologies.

The Homesense project was therefore designed to enable user-led innovation within the home environment, building alongside existing environmental and social conditions allowing end-users to address their own concerns in their physical and ‘lived in’ space. Homesense sought to bring the open collaboration methods of online communities to physical infrastructures in the home. Designing a toolkit to support this approach is explored as a topic of this presentation.

Natasha Carolan is a PhD student at HighWire Doctoral Training Centre, Lancaster University where her research considers commodification of design and production processes in the digital economy. A product designer by background, her research explores open and user innovation, service design and value co-creation in areas of NPD and manufacturing. Natasha co-designed the Homesense toolkit by situating the toolkit as a cultural probe a strategy that Natasha believes is important in placing open source hardware in a democratic system as a tool for learning and empowerment.

Quick2Wire

Quick2Wire Limited is a start-up that is developing a range of OSH/OSS add-on products for the Raspberry Pi. The first product is an experimenter's kit, contaning an expansion board, a set of components with which to experiment, software to drive the Pi, and an instruction manual. This will be followed by a series of expansion kits, using I2C and SPI to add capabilities like ADC, DAC, PWM and stepper motor drivers.

All the hardware and software will be released under open source licences.

The presentation will conclude with a demonstration using hardware prototypes driven by a Raspberry Pi.

Romilly Cocking spent the ten years before his 'retirement' as an agile software developer, coach and trainer. He spent the first two years of retirement experimenting with robotics. Then Raspberry Pi came along, and now Romilly works full-time running Quick2Wire.

Note: Please aim to arrive for 18:00 - 18:20 as the event will start at 18:30 prompt.

Sponsored by:

Kits (Homesense, Quick2Wire)

via OSHUG

For those that are new to hardware development it can prove a daunting prospect, and kits that address the needs of those with little or no experience in this area have a vital role to play. At the nineteenth OSHUG meeting we will be hearing about two such kits, one that was designed to support user-led smart home innovation and that was based around the Arduino platform, and an experimenters kit for the Raspberry Pi that is currently in development.

The Homesense Project

The Homesense project was a European user-led, smart-home development project employing open source hardware. The project was led by Tinker London and EDF and engaged households supported by local experts in the design and development of smart home concepts.

The project was developed as a reaction to top-down design approaches commonly observed in technological development and home building. Most early research viewed smart homes as a single complex system that is designed and constructed from the ground up, and assumes that most aspects (physical building, digital infrastructure, furniture, appliances) are under the control of a single smart-home developer. (Kortuem et al. 2010)

In the contrasting reality however of multi-vendor development and retrofitting this is rarely the case. Inspired also by an argument that smart homes are developed by experts in a top down approach subsequently living with a smart home is acknowledged to be problematic to non-experts who lack control over respective technologies.

The Homesense project was therefore designed to enable user-led innovation within the home environment, building alongside existing environmental and social conditions allowing end-users to address their own concerns in their physical and ‘lived in’ space. Homesense sought to bring the open collaboration methods of online communities to physical infrastructures in the home. Designing a toolkit to support this approach is explored as a topic of this presentation.

Natasha Carolan is a PhD student at HighWire Doctoral Training Centre, Lancaster University where her research considers commodification of design and production processes in the digital economy. A product designer by background, her research explores open and user innovation, service design and value co-creation in areas of NPD and manufacturing. Natasha co-designed the Homesense toolkit by situating the toolkit as a cultural probe a strategy that Natasha believes is important in placing open source hardware in a democratic system as a tool for learning and empowerment.

Quick2Wire

Quick2Wire Limited is a start-up that is developing a range of OSH/OSS add-on products for the Raspberry Pi. The first product is an experimenter's kit, contaning an expansion board, a set of components with which to experiment, software to drive the Pi, and an instruction manual. This will be followed by a series of expansion kits, using I2C and SPI to add capabilities like ADC, DAC, PWM and stepper motor drivers.

All the hardware and software will be released under open source licences.

The presentation will conclude with a demonstration using hardware prototypes driven by a Raspberry Pi.

Romilly Cocking spent the ten years before his 'retirement' as an agile software developer, coach and trainer. He spent the first two years of retirement experimenting with robotics. Then Raspberry Pi came along, and now Romilly works full-time running Quick2Wire.

Note: Please aim to arrive for 18:00 - 18:20 as the event will start at 18:30 prompt.

Sponsored by: