Tag Archives: arduino

Pick colors from real things with this portable tool

via Arduino Blog

If you want a red piece of paper, or a blue pen, what does that really mean? If you’d like to get more specific, Michael Klements’ Arduino-based scanner lets you quantify colors in numerical RGB values via a TCS34725 sensor.

User interface for the handheld device is extremely simple, with a single button to trigger the sensor and measure colors, along with a 16×2 panel. An optional RGB LED attempts to copy the shade of whatever object you’re aiming at, providing a handy reference to verify it’s working correctly. 

You can see the build process in the video below, first constructed on a breadboard and then placed in a more permanent soldered configuration with a 3D-printed case.

Aarnio adds force feedback and sensing to chairs

via Arduino Blog

Desk chairs are essential tools for the office environment, so why not turn them into a computer input and feedback device? Aarnio, by researchers from several universities, adds this functionality via an Arduino board. It’s able to detect rotation and tilt via an MPU-6050 IMU, and how far it travels along the floor with an optical sensor from a computer mouse.

User feedback is provided by servo motors that can lock individual casters down. A brake setup is also implemented to inhibit rotation of the central axis and a spring is tightened as needed to modify tilt force. 

Testing showed about a 90% feedback recognition in users, and applications could include use as a gaming controller or as an assistive device for those with limited mobility of their hands.

You can read more about Aarnio in its research paper here.

Upgrading a ride-on car to a joystick-controlled assistive device

via Arduino Blog

Child-sized wheelchairs can be difficult to come by, and unfortunately aren’t as much fun as something like a ride-on car. The South Eugene Robotics Team, or FRC2521, decided to address both challenges by building a mini Jeep augmented for kids with limited mobility.

Instructions found here detail how to modify the battery-powered toy, including what can be recycled and what extra parts will need to be purchased. In the new configuration, the Jeep’s two rear motors are configured for differential control, with the input regulated by an Arduino Nano and a pair of electronic speed controllers (ESCs). 

In this project, a joystick replaces the original pedal and steering wheel, and it looks like a lot of fun when implemented in the similarly-outfitted firetruck below.

Scale model Oldsmobile Dynamic 88 wagon handles like the real thing

via Arduino Blog

Model cars can be fun to use and look at, but when driving one it’s difficult to get the same sort of movement in the suspension as a full-sized vehicle. To enhance his 65cm long 8.5:1 Oldsmobile Dynamic 88, creator Dimitar Tilev turned to an active suspension system controlled by four micro servo motors.

When maneuvering the little beast, an Arduino board along with an MPU-6050 IMU allow it to raise and lower each wheel individually based on the forces it experiences, giving an amazing approximation of an actual car’s behavior. 

The build also features a sound effects system to simulate engine noises and exhaust pops, and an attention to detail in the styling that sets it apart as something really special. 

More info on the project can be found in Tilev’s blog post or see it in action in the videos below! 

Arduino goes PRO at CES 2020

via Arduino Blog

We’re kicking off this year’s CES with some big news.

Millions of users and thousands of companies across the world already use Arduino as an innovation platform, which is why we have drawn on this experience to enable enterprises to quickly and securely connect remote sensors to business logic within one simple IoT application development platform: a new solution for professionals in traditional sectors aspiring for digital transformation through IoT. 

Combining a low-code application development platform with modular hardware makes tangible results possible in just one day. This means companies can build, measure, and iterate without expensive consultants or lengthy integration projects.

Built on Arm Pelion technology, the latest generation of Arduino solutions brings users simplicity of integration and a scalable, secure, professionally supported service. 

By combining the power and flexibility of our production ready IoT hardware with our secure, scalable and easy to integrate cloud services we are putting in the hands of our customers something really disruptive,” commented Arduino CEO Fabio Violante. “Among the millions of Arduino customers, we’ve even seen numerous businesses transform from traditional ‘one off’ selling to subscription-based service models, creating new IoT-based revenue streams with Arduino as the enabler. The availability of a huge community of developers with Arduino skills is also an important plus and gives them the confidence to invest in our technology”.  

But that’s not all. At CES 2020, we are also excited to announce the powerful new Arduino Portenta family. Designed for demanding industrial applications, AI edge processing and robotics, it features a new standard for open high-density interconnect to support advanced peripherals. The first member of the family is the Arduino Portenta H7 module – a dual-core Arm Cortex-M7 and Cortex-M4 operating at 480MHz and 240MHz, respectively, with industrial temperature-range (-40 to 85°C) components. The Portenta H7 is capable of running Arduino code, Python and JavaScript, making it accessible to an even broader audience of developers.

The new Arduino Portenta H7 is now available for pre-order on the Arduino online store, with an estimated delivery date of late February 2020.

Adaptive Field Robot changes wheel shape to overcome various terrain

via Arduino Blog

If your robotic vehicle will only work on smooth surfaces, the choice of a wheel is obvious. For more rugged bots, the same applies with knobby wheels. For those that need to operate in both environments, however, the Adaptive Field Robot presents a new solution in the form of wheels that actually change dynamically depending on the terrain.

This Arduino-powered robot is able to transform its two driving wheels from a nearly circular shape into a claw-like arrangement using secondary motors that rotate along with the wheel assembly.

When the bot detects an obstacle in its path via an ultrasonic sensor, the motors springs into action, activating a rack-and-pinion system that expands the two halves of the wheel into “claw mode.” 

Be sure to check out this innovative robot in the video below, including some trial-and-error during the development process.