Tag Archives: arduino

Now you can battle real robots over the Internet

via Arduino Blog

Robot-sumo bouts can be a great way to pit your automation skills against others. Participating normally means a lot of hard work to get your bot functioning properly, and likely a fair amount of travel to meet your opponents. SurrogateTV, however, has a new alternative with their SumoBots Battle Royale game that allows you to fight actual robots over the Internet.

Their customized “pushers” from JSumo are made out of steel sheets, powered by an Arduino, a motor shield and a lithium-ion battery — all housed inside a 3D-printed enclosure — and tracked by a computer vision system. Four motors are used for movement and a servo on the top flips them right side up as needed.

The ring isn’t just a traditional circle either, but an area that is always dynamically changing. SurrogateTV decided on an interactive floor that drops as the game goes on, voted upon by the chat/viewers. A quick overview of the build process and how it works can be seen in the video below.

This Portal 2 fan created his own Space Core

via Arduino Blog

Portal 2 is one of RobotsWithRyan’s favorite games, so he — of course — decided to build his own personality core character from this title

His Space Core is 3D-printed from a model that he found online, scaled up by 300% to fit the electronics inside, including an Arduino Uno and eight servo actuators. As with many projects, there was barely enough room to fit the electrical components, but as seen in the video below, it looks delightfully glitchy.

The Arduino controls the servo-driven eye movement and is linked to a smartphone over Bluetooth for remote operation. A second phone is integrated into the moving eye section, which displays an image of the personality core’s iris, and plays game quotes through its music app.

An Arduino-powered fishing pole with automatic casting and reeling

via Arduino Blog

YouTuber MrTeslonian was asked if he could create an automatic fishing pole for someone with a serious disability. While this would seem like a daunting task, he was able to build one using a spring-loaded mechanism, a number of motors, and an Arduino board.

His portable device takes commands over WiFi, allowing control from a smartphone or computer. When it receives the signal, the pole is automatically pulled back and tension is added to a large spring via a winch. This tension is then released with a servo-actuated system, and a small gearmotor reels the bait back in… hopefully with a fish attached!

How to make analog sensor readings with digital I/O pins

via Dangerous Prototypes

Edward Mallon wrote an article describing a technique he used to make analog sensor readings with digital I/O pins:

Will this method replace our pin-toggled oversampling? Perhaps not for something as simple as a thermistor since that method has already proven itself in the real world, and I don’t really have anything better to do with A6 & A7. And oversampling still has the advantage of being simultaneously available on all the analog inputs, while the ICU is a limited resource. Given the high resolution that’s potentially available with the Timer1/ICU combination, I might save this method for sensors with less dynamic range. I already have some ideas there and, of course, lots more testing to do before I figure out if there are other problems related to this new method. I still haven’t determined what the long-term drift is with our Pro Mini clones, and the WDT experiment taught me to be cautious about counting those chickens.

See the full post at thecavepearlproject.org.

James Bruton’s 3D-printed, Arduino-powered Nerf blaster fires 10 darts at once

via Arduino Blog

Nerf guns can be a lot of fun, but what if you want your launcher to shoot 10 projectiles simultaneously? Is so, then look no further than James Bruton’s custom blaster.

His 3D-printed project employs two BLDC-powered rollers to accelerate cartridges of 10 darts each, and allows for quick reloading via a clever manual locking mechanism. The device holds five magazines, for total of 50 darts.

When loaded, an arcade-style button fires the darts, pushing them into the rollers at the same time using a couple of servo motors. Everything is powered by a six-cell 24V LiPo battery, while an Arduino Mega is used for control, and to track which cartridge is in place, enabling the operator to concentrate on getting shots downrange!

ClearCrawler Strandbeeest walks under Arduino control

via Arduino Blog

Maker Jeremy S. Cook has been building Theo Jansen-style walkers for literally years, and after several iterations has come up with what he calls the “ClearCrawler.” 

This little guy stands at just over 15 inches tall — including its comparatively large clear cylindrical head — and travels around via a pair of motors that move four legs on either side like tank treads.

For control, Cook is using an Arduino Nano onboard, along with a motor driver, plus an Uno and joystick shield as the remote unit. Communication between the two is accomplished by a pair of nRF24L01+ radio modules. 

Code for the project is available on GitHub, and the build is split up into an electronics and mechanical section in the videos below.