Tag Archives: arduino

Rudimentary ultrasound machine made with Arduino Due

via Arduino Blog

Ultrasound images are an important tool for medical diagnosis, and while units used by doctors can be very expensive, getting a basic image doesn’t have to be. Inspired by this attempt at a $500 ultrasound machine seen here, maker “stoppi71” decided to create his own using a 5 MHz ultrasound transducer via a paint-thickness gauge.

An Arduino Due provides computing power to turn sound pulses into images, while a 3.5-inch TFT display shows what it’s examining. Short pulses in the 100-200 nanosecond range are generated with the help of a monoflop and MOSFET, returning an echo corresponding to what it’s “looking” at. 

Although the results are not nearly what you’d expect at the doctor’s office, rudimentary readings of skin and bone are definitely visible. 

I’ve examined different objects from aluminum-cylinders over water-filled balloons to my body. To see body-echos the amplification of the signals must be very high. For the aluminum-cylinders a lower amplification is needed. When you look at the pictures you can clearly see the echoes from the skin and my bone.

So what can I say about the success or failure of this project. It is possible to look inside the body with such simple methods and using parts, which aren’t commonly intended for that purpose. But these factors are limiting the results too. You don’t get such clear and well structured pictures compared with commercial solutions.

This drink machine pours, slices, and dispenses mint!

via Arduino Blog

Automated cocktail machines can be fun projects, but this device by CamdenS5 takes things to a whole new level. Not only can it pour liquids from multiple bottles, but it chops limes, dispenses sugar and mint, and even features a refrigerated compartment to keep ingredients at the appropriate temperature.

An Arduino Mega along with an Uno are employed for control, while user interface is provided by an Android tablet affixed to the front of the assembly. 

There’s a lot going on mechanically inside, including a linear actuator for chopping, and augers that dole out mint/sugar as needed. 

Details on the build are available here, with code/files ready for download, and an interactive Fusion 360 model that you can manipulate in your browser.

Arduino Day Community Challenge: Andruino and Home Automation

via Arduino Blog

Back on Arduino Day, we announced the winners of the Arduino Day Community Challenge, awarding the best community projects and their impact on the local and global community.

The contest collected more than 120 projects from all over the world, broken down into seven different categories: home automation, social innovation, kids and education, environment and space, robotics, audio and visual arts, small scale manufacturing, and startups.

With this blog post, we want to inaugurate a series where we learn more about each of the winning entries. The first project highlighted is Andruino, the best submission from the ‘home automation’ category. Prototyped in Palermo (Italy) by Andrea Scavuzzo, Andruino is an Arduino-based smart home system that enables users to control the devices around their house in real-time via an accompanying app, the AndruinoApp.

What’s the project about?

‘The Andruino ecosystem is based on the AndruinoApp and a number of Arduino-compatible nodes (e.g. Arduino Mega, NodeMCU, ESP8266 or STM32 Nucleo boards). Once the hardware is configured with the AndruinoApp, users will be able to communicate with their nodes (over a proprietary IoT infrastructure), checking their status, and controlling the devices in real-time. For instance, with Andruino you can control the room temperature, the humidity, and check if your door is locked all in an instant via your phone. Moreover, you can also record the data and create graphs to analyse consumption around your home to make it more efficient.’

What inspired you to develop this project?

With my phone in my hands, I thought that my mobile device was the best interface for my Arduino.

What is the impact of Andruino on the local/global community?

I have created an easy to use, open-source and inexpensive remote control system for the home… almost everyone can benefit from it.  

What are the next developments for your project?

I want to prototype ‘Garagino,’ a remote control system for my garage.

How can we learn more about Andruino?

You can visit my website, or check out my write-up on the Arduino Project Hub.

Watch the video below as Andrea Scavuzzo presents Andruino to the Arduino community.

Arduino-powered ornithopter takes to the skies!

via Arduino Blog

While much less common than quadcopters or airplanes, if you want a device that truly soars like a bird, you need an ornithopter. To help others make their own flying contraption, YouTuber Amperka Cyber Couch is outlining the build process in a video series starting with the one seen below.

Construction is also very well documented in his project write-up, and a clip of it in-flight can be found here. The bionic ‘bird’ uses a BLDC/ESC combination to turn a gearbox that flaps its wings, and an onboard Arduino Nano for control. 

Communication is via an MBee 868 wireless module, which links up to an Arduino Uno base station that provides its user interface.

The Blade is a dual Game Boy chiptune keytar

via Arduino Blog

Keytars may have had their moment of popularity in the 1980s, but instruments of the day can’t hold a candle to “The Blade” by makers Sam Wray, Siddharth Vadgama, and Greig Stewart. 

The musical device feeds signals from a pair of Guitar Hero necks, along with a stripped down keytar from Rock Band, into an Arduino Mega. This data is then sent to a Raspberry Pi running PD Extended, and is used to control a pair of Game Boys to produce distinct 8-bit sounds. Audio output can be further modified with a Leap Motion sensor embedded in one of the two necks. 

What makes up The Blade?

– 3D-printed housing

We custom modeled and printed a housing for the instrument to ensure it would be ergonomic to wield, hold together with all the components, and also look badass.

– Two Guitar Hero necks

The necks, hacked off a couple of old Guitar Hero controllers, were totally rewired to output the button presses to jumper cables.

– Arduino Mega

All the wiring from the Guitar Hero necks fed into the Mega, which then registered the button presses and output appropriate MIDI signals over USB serial into the Raspberry Pi.

– Rock Band keytar

We stripped this down to the bare keyboard and had the MIDI also going into the Pi.

Raspberry Pi

Taking in all the MIDI, and running PD Extended we got this to manage and re-map all the button presses we needed. This then output to a MIDI thru box.

– Arduino Boy

This fed the MIDI signals from the thru box into the Game Boy.

Game Boy

These were heart. With MIDI fed in from a multitude of sources, the Game Boy, running mGB, was the synthesizing the signals into sound, output via a standard 3.5mm jack. 

Leap Motion
The Leap Motion was used for further sound modulation.

One machine that does it all!

via Arduino Blog

While having a huge workshop with every tool imaginable is ideal, if you have limited funds and/or space, then Mark Miller’s gantry-style machine could be just the thing you need. 

In this setup, the workpiece moves via a stepper motor and a rod system on the bottom, while top support rods accommodate interchangeable tooling.

Tools compatible with the machine (so far) include a 10 watt laser, marker, knife for stencil carving, and a motor/router bit combo for light milling operations. An Arduino is employed for control, while user interface is provided by a series of buttons and a joystick. 

Miller even wrote custom software to transform CAD files into sketches that can be directly loaded onto the machine.

The project is still a work in progress, so be sure to follow along in its Hackaday write-up here.