Tag Archives: arduino

Want to help Arduino.CC? Take a pic of your Arduino packages!

via Arduino Blog

ArduinoManufactured

We are posting below an interesting blogpost published on the Adafruit’s website on Sunday April 19th, and then mentioned by Hackaday.

Give it a read and use the #TeamArduinoCC tag when posting a pic of your packaging: that’s how you can show your support to Arduino.cc!

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Please post old Arduino packaging that says “Manufactured under license from Arduino” #TeamArduinoCC
Hey folks, as a lot of you know there’s a huge Arduino vs Arduino dispute (Hackaday / MAKE coverage / Arduino.cc). We’re currently making an official Arduino with Arduino.cc so we’re not commenting at this time for all sorts of good reasons, however, we, as in the Arduino.cc community, could use your help. If you could dig up any old Arduino packaging that has “Manufactured under license from Arduino by SMART PROJECTS” and post the photos – that could be pretty helpful for “team Arduino.cc”.

PLEASE INDICATE what country where you purchased the products in and what year!

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Pictured above, an Arduino UNO from September 2014 from Becky Stern’s desk. She had it unopened and we were able to see an important detail “Manufactured under license from Arduino by SMART PROJECTS S.r.l. Via Romano, 12 10010 Scarmagno Italy.

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Please post any old packaging you have from older Arduino products that also have this on Flickr, G+, Instagram, Twitter, wherever you can, you can use the tag #TeamArduinoCC to help. You can also email it to teamarduinocc@adafruit.com


 

Here’s a video showing where’s the sentence mentioned by Adafruit and below the #TeamArduinoCC  hashtag timeline:

 

Let’s make robots exploring lake depths

via Arduino Blog

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Sea Renderings is a water robot made by Geir Andersen in 2010 with the aim of measuring water depths in lakes and running on Arduino Duemilanove:

The purpose of this robot is to have it log water depths along a predefined set of waypoints. It stores its data on memory sticks or on SD cards. The estimated runtime is about 24 hours and with a top speed of 3km/h it will travel roughly 72km. With a log entry for every 10m this would give us over 700 depth measurements with full GPS reference.

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Geir’s project page is hosted at Let’s Make Robots,  a free and volunteer based initiative produced and maintained by members of the robot building  community. You can have a look at the documentation and some of the illustrations showing the output of the measurements done at Lake Riskedalsvatnet in Norway.

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Casa Jasmina with Opendesk @ Milan Design Week

via Arduino Blog

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Casa Jasmina and Arduino are proud to announce a collaboration with Opendesk at Atelier Clerici during Fuorisalone 2015.

Atelier Clerici will host an independent project curated by Space Caviar and Z33, with a daily program of exhibitions and activities aimed at questioning the future of design in relation to architecture, technology and global context of living.

Opendesk, the online platform for open and smart design, will join Atelier Clerici with ‘Open Making Platform’ a series of events exploring issues related to open source design as a global and, at the same time, local practice. The program of  ‘Open Making Platform’ will include an exhibition of smart open designs made by local Italian makers and two workshops: ‘Design for Open Making’ (Wed April 15th, 11.30 am – 1.30 pm)and ‘Smart Furniture’ (Fri April 17th, 2 – 5.30 PM), in collaboration with Arduino.

Arduino and Casa Jasmina invite you to take part to the meetup and informal workshop focusing on the integration of open source connected technologies into everyday objects. Friday’s event will include a presentation by Bruce Sterling about the Casa Jasmina project.

Register for the event here.

Install Intel Galileo & Edison with the IDE Boards Manager

via Arduino Blog

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We are very pleased to announce the availability of Intel® Galileo and Edison boards support with the Arduino IDE Boards Manager.

If you’ve already installed the Arduino IDE 1.6.3 (or newer), you are already set!

Just click on menu Tools > Board > Boards Manager to find both Galileo and Edison listed and available for download. Click on one of the list, then click Install. Wait a couple of minutes for the IDE to download and unpack all the needed tools and voilà: Board menu will list the Intel board of your choice.

 

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Thanks for Celebrating Arduino Day around the world!

via Arduino Blog

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At the end of March Arduino Day was celebrated around the world in more than 260 official and community events. In the video below Massimo Banzi, David Cuartielles, Tom Igoe and David Mellis sent a message to the whole community from the celebration taking place at MIT in Boston:

Take a look at some pictures from official Arduino Day which happened in Boston, Torino, Malmo, Budapest and Bangalore and some birthday cakes popping up on Twitter:

We also wanted to share  links some  organizers sent us to explore pictures/videos of local communities’ gatherings:

Do you have pictures and videos to share of your Arduino Day? Post the link in the comments!

Creative Technologies in the Classroom goes to Ecuador

via Arduino Blog

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We are happy to announce that Creative Technologies in the Classroom has been successfully implemented in Ecuador since the fall of 2014 in 40 different places along the country, to more than 600 participants and thanks to the Telefonica Foundation Ecuador.

Creative Technologies in the Classroom (CTC) is a collection of experiments aimed at transforming the way technology is taught in schools around the world for participants going from 10 to 18 years old. These experiments introduce basic concepts in programming, electronics, and mechanics and consists of four phases:

  • Teacher Training (1 week)
  • Themed Modules (4 modules)
  • Student Projects (9 weeks)
  • Technology Fair

CTC Ecuador has also been implemented within the Pro Niño Project that helps employed children to attend to educational activities and learn about technology. This aims to open an opportunity for them to study at the technical universities in the area (many of them also support the project). The teachers for CTC/Pro Niño are social workers instead of regular school teachers. Here are some pictures of the program in El Oro and the South of Quito.

Some CTC Ecuador projects were also presented at an exhibition in Cuenca about society, art and technology hosted by Telefonica Movistar Ecuador.

(The news was originally posted on Arduino Verkstad blog)

Making Space Accessible to Students with U of M Satellite

via Arduino Blog

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The U of M Satellite project started in 2010 as a student group at the University of Manitoba with the goal of building a nano satellite (10 x 10 x 34 cm) and make space accessible to the public. We got in touch with Ahmed Byagowi, co-founder of the project, who teaches robotics in the same university. Ahmed told us that U of M Satellite became soon very popular, in fact  more than 300 students joined the group. In the first iteration the satellite’s goal was studying a micro animal (about 1 mm) called tardigrades and see its behaviour in space. The second iteration started in 2012, the same year of the launch of the Arduino Due and that’s why they designed everything based on it.

We had a nice talk with Ahmed and asked a bit more about the project.

Why is space so important for research, and why it would be cool if more people could have access to it?

Space research is important because it challenges us to solve problems and find solutions which can translate to everyday life here on Earth. The products of space research and space technology are all around us today. From the ballpoint pen, all the way to GPS, special composite materials, special surgical equipment and satellite communication.

For a while, only government and military had access to space. However, over the past decade there has been a rapid increase in commercial and public access to space. Private companies can take risks that the government and military can not, which leads to even bolder and newer technologies being developed.

For the general public, there are many creative and dynamic thinkers in the world who may not be able to share their ideas through a government agency or company. Public access to space allows more people to innovate on their own terms, and with 7 billion people on this planet, surely there are a great deal of innovation to be found.

With more people involved in researching space technologies, even more ideas can reach fruition, which can hopefully lead to technologies that will benefit life here on Earth even more.

There are other open source projects going to space (i.e. Ardusat), how’s U of M Student Satellite different or similar to others?

Ardusat is using Arduino as its payload (in fact, 16 of them) to run certain experiments in space and its main controller system is based on other processors and software. On the other hand, UMSATS’ satellite is going to be based on the Arduino Due architecture (the main controller) aided by the Arduino Zero and Arduino Uno’s design for payload and other controllers such as attitude determination and control system (ADCS) and power management as well as onboard image processing.

In which way open source is making exploration of space possible?

Open source makes things more accessible and helps a community work together to solve problems. If more open source platforms become available that can aid in space exploration, people can focus their efforts more on the next big problem using tools already developed, instead of resolving the same problems over and over again (reinventing the wheel). Plus, learning from watching other people’s work is a great way to learn things and apparently for some people like me or Massimo, this is best way to learn programming (based on Massimo’s TED talk).

Could you give us a bit more details on how you are using Arduino DUE ?

Our main Command and Data Handling (CDH) controller is based on the SAM3X8E and we are using Arduino Due’s bootloader and IDE for the software development. We added some more software layers as well as a scheduler and we aim to open source the entire software and hardware as soon as possible. In the picture of our motherboard below, you can clearly see the SAM3X8E and on the top right, there is a SMD version of the ATMEGA328P running and Arduino Uno core and acts as the beacon transmitter. This board encompasses the CDH, ADCS, Power and Communication of 2 meter and 70 cm bands (144.390MHz and 435MHz ham radio bands).

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A famous quote of Massimo’s Banzi says: “You don’t need anyone’s permission to make something great” and in your TED talk you start saying “You can make big things using small tools”, what’s the relations between the two?

There is no formula for greatness. We live in a time where anything is truly possible, and the way to achieve your goals is numerous. Nobody said we couldn’t do something big with our small satellite, and we didn’t ask if we could either. Instead, we try to do big things with small tools that are accessible to us.

Arduino IDE 1.6.3 released and available for download

via Arduino Blog

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A new version of the Arduino IDE (1.6.3) is available at the download page!
The Arduino IDE 1.6.3 is a bug fix release: after having released 1.6.2 with new libraries and cores managers, we received lots of useful feedback and fixed a handful of bugs.

In particular:

  • Fixed some impolite crashes on some Linux distributions
  • Bundled AVR core files are back into hardware folder
  • Fixed “https” links not working on Windows and Mac
  • Added new Arduino Language color highlight
  • Introduced a way to help old cores to work with newer IDEs without having to upgrade their code
  • Advise of duplicate libraries after compiling. Thanks @PaulStoffregen

As usual, the complete list of fixes and credits is available here.

Don’t forget to check out the Library Manager: at the time of writing, 144 libraries are listed, thanks to the contributions of Paul Stoffregen and Adafruit.

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Just a quick note on the Arduino Language color coding, we assigned different colors to the three Language categories listed in the Arduino Reference. Structure keywords are green, variables are teal, while functions stays orange. We did a lot of user testing on these new color highlights, and it is helpful for beginners to have a bit more of a visual cue when starting to write code.

Don’t forget to report any issue you find, either on Github or on the Arduino forum: your help is very much appreciated. It doesn’t matter if you are not a tech specialist: every feedback adds value.

Happy hacking!

Using Arduino Esplora with graphical programming languages

via Arduino Blog

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Alan Yorinks shared on Arduino Community on Gplus a physical computing environment he created to make it easier for 10 and 11 year old’s to start playing. He picked up an Arduino Esplora, and wrote some software so that it could be controlled from the Scratch and Snap! graphical programming languages. According to Alan, the Arduino Esplora has on-board integrated sensors, actuators and make it a perfect match for the graphical programming languages that the kids love to use.

By combining an Arduino Esplora microcontroller with the esp4s library and either the Scratch or Snap! programming languages, that first line of code can be written in minutes!

Take a look at his documentation on Github.

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Arduino IDE 1.6.2 released and available for download

via Arduino Blog

Arduino IDE 1.6.2

A new version of the Arduino IDE (1.6.2) is available at the download page!

The Arduino IDE 1.6.2 features new one click install of boards and libraries.

With 1.6.2, two new menu items are available: “Sketch > Include Library > Manage Libraries…” and “Tools > Board > Boards Manager…”

We have written two guides that explain how to use them. Discover how to use the Library Manager and how to install support for additional boards.

If you don’t find your preferred library in the list, let us know: open an issue on github and request us to add the library you love!

Having such tools allow us to better and easier deliver updates for both cores and libraries: just open Library Manager or Boards Manager to find an Update button on the updatable items.

IDE 1.6.2 also includes a handful of bug fixes and improvements, also thanks to our fantastic community of hackers and makers:

  • Ever suffered of a super slow Tools menu? Solved! Ports list gets refreshed in background, so you won’t need to wait any more.
  • We have dropped support for Mac OS X 10.6 or older: previous versions of the IDE will remain available for download at the previous releases page.
  • A new EEPROM library, thanks to @Chris–A
  • Pre and post build hooks, thanks to @Wackerbarth
  • Various bug fixes, thanks to @Timmmm, @vicatcu, @arve0 and @Xuth

As usual, the complete list of fixes and credits is available here.

Don’t forget to report any issue you find, either on Github or on the Arduino forum: your help is very much appreciated. It doesn’t matter if you are not a tech specialist: every feedback adds value.

Session of work on 1.6.3 will start on Monday: we are now enjoying  Arduino Day!

Play with the Basketball Robot running on Intel Edison

via Arduino Blog

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After you had an introduction to Intel Edison  following the Getting Started guide, and our previous tutorial, the Intel Edison mini-breakout Getting Started Guide, it’s now time to work on something a bit more complex. You’ll be also able to play a bit with Node.js,  a programming platform that runs on javascript and a good choice for building a web-based application. It is supported by the Intel® Edison standard system image so you can run node.js scripts directly on it.

He shoots! He scores! The crowd goes wild! Let’s build a robot that plays basketball with you. This tutorial is a step-by-step guide for a simple and small differential-drive robot that uses the Intel Edison. You’ll get to know a few more tricks on how to use Mini Breakout Kit and set up a node.js server for the communication.

Go and follow the steps to build it

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Having fun with music in a science class

via Arduino Blog

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A science teacher at Bundang management high school 20 kilometers southeast of downtown Seoul, South Korea, involved his students in an Arduino Music project running Arduino Uno, Sparkfun Music Instrument Shield and Makey Makey.

Students started studying the principles of sensors and then built their own music instruments using recycled materials. Finally they played them as you can see from the video he shared with us:

See more pictures and videos at this link.

An open hardware quartz crystal microbalance for ultra high mass sensitivity

via Arduino Blog

openQCM

Marco Mauro is a physicist currently employed as Scientific Coordinator at Novaetech, the first Spin-off Company of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) in Italy. He shared with us all the info about a project he’s been working on  and based on Arduino Micro.

OpenQCM is a fully open source scientific microbalance capable of weighing mass deposition down to 1 billionth of gram:

The sensing core of the microbalance is a piezoelectric quartz crystal oscillator. The deposition of a very tiny mass on the surface causes the variation in the quartz frequency. openQCM belongs to a new generation of innovative smart sensor which boast high resolution and ultra high mass sensitivity. The open source strategy made the creation of openQCM available at low cost which represents a bit fraction of the cost of similar scientific products.

openQCM was built keeping in mind the emergent principles of the open source hardware movement. The open source hardware gives people the freedom to control their technology through the open exchange of all the project features, 3D design, electronics and software. The open hardware potentiality is even greater when it comes to hardware for scientific applications.

openQCM is exactly something like that, the first open hardware quartz crystal microbalance with applications in a wide range of scientific fields, such as chemical and biological sensing, material science.

openQCM has an Arduino Micro board inside at heart. By hacking the timer counter of the AtMega32U4 Arduino microcontroller, it is possible to measure the quartz crystal frequency variations using the 16 Mhz microprocessor clock. openQCM team has designed an Arduino Micro shield with an embedded quartz crystal oscillator driver circuit and a temperature sensor. The output of the quartz crystal oscillator driver is fed to the Arduino Micro timer counter and the analog value of the temperature sensor is fed to the analog pin of the board. This configuration allow you measure the quartz crystal frequency with a resolution of 1 Hz, which roughly corresponds to a mass resolution of 700 pg over the entire quartz surface in air.

One of the major challenge of an open hardware project is that such devices require funding to prototype and manufacture. That’s why the openQCM team have selected the 3d printing technology to keep high quality and low cost. Using 3d printing to print out the prototypes via the SLS process from OS Formiga P100, P110, P395, and P730, the openQCM team created the device’s parts, which required a precision down to 60 µm.

The open source concept made openQCM publicly available so that anyone (scientists, technology enthusiast, makers, hobbyist …) can study, modify, and develop the hardware based on the original design. openQCM is now working and ready to win the heart of the scientific community and more.

Go and make one yourself!

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It’s about us: meet the people working at Arduino

via Arduino Blog

AboutUs

Today we are adding to Arduino website a new important page. It’s called About Us and presents all the people working at Arduino, side by side with the Arduino founders, from different locations around the world.

Our big team, with its multifaceted skillset, takes care of the complexity of an open-source hardware project like Arduino, made by the Hardware, the Software, the Design of all the artifacts and the user experience, the coordination of these activities by the Management, and of course the work with its Community of volunteers and enthusiasts.

This almost invisible works helps Arduino thrive and hopefully makes it easier for you to learn electronics and have fun!

Come meet us on March 28th in all the official locations of Arduino Day!